(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Yoncopin"

Student 



L « knows what's happening 



Academics knows the answer 



organizations taowsjip^o^ontribute ^ 



People knows new memories 



Sports knows about teamwork 



, . . knows special bonds 



158-133 



jdVUtax knows kind support 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yoncopin752001edit 



where 




knows your 





name 




photo courtesy of: Public Relations 
GETTING TO KNOW YOU. Junior Pepper 
Kauffman, Freshman Zak Moore, and Sophomore 
Uz Daughenbaugh play with umbrellas being given 
away by the local newspaper during Orientation 
week. "Orientation was a lot of fun because it helped 
me get to better know the people that I will spend the 
next four years of my life with," says Moore. 



Yoncopin 2001. Volume 25. 

Centenary College of Louisiana. 

2911 Centenary Boulevard. Streveport LA 71104. 

(318) 869-5001. Mtp://ww.centenaryedir. 

Total Student Enrollment: 1035. 




photo courtesy of: Public Relations 

A ONE-ON-ONE EXPERIENCE. Students receive 
up-close and personal instruction from Dr. Beth 
Leuck as she points out information on a computer 
screen during a biology lab. Junior Jean Ancelet 
says, "Teachers work hard at putting things into 
context and with working one-on-one with students 
rather than being figure-heads." 




photo courtesy of: Public Relations 
WRAPPING IT UP. Senior soccer players gather 
together for a moment of fun and pride after winning 
the last game of the season against Georgia A&M, 
rounding out a successful season. Senior Shannon 
Richardson says, "The friendships we created play- 
ing soccer changed the game from being fun to 
being unforgettable." 



SWINGIN' 
AWAY. Stu- 
dents run all over 
campus hitting 
tennis balls with 
golf clubs. It's a 
game called Tolf, 
and students be- 
came very famil- 
iar with the name 
of the game as 
they got sucked in 
by the Tolfing 
craze. Partici- 
pants in the new 
game even gath- 
ered together to 
begin forming 
Centenary's first 
ever Tolf Club. 



WEARING THEIR NAME WITH PRIDE. Members of ZetaTau Alpha wearthe shirts they 
made especially for the Homecoming tailgate party. The girls proudly wave and cheer as they ride 
the float through the streets and show the community that they are proud to wear the name "Gents." 




ENT. Senior Ashley Knecht and Junior Laura Lindsay get a little friendly with the Gent at the Sneak 
Peek of the new Fitness Center. Everyone on campus knows and loves the friendly Gent! 



ADDING HONOR TO THE NAME. French professor Dana 
Kress was selected for the I'Ordre des Palmes Academiques. A 
knighthood established by Napoleon, the honor is the highest 
academic distinction offered by the French government. "It is a 
privilege to teach French in Louisiana, the one francophone state in 
the union. I owe a tremendous debt to all those students who work 
so hard on so many projects and to the administration of the College 
for the strong support they have always shown," says Dr. Kress. 



2 |Tjieme 



opening 



creating a bond... 



The more things change, 
the more they stay the same. 
Although Centenary College has not always made 
it's home in Louisiana, many people through the 
years have made their home at Centenary Col- 
lege. The uniqe atmosphere and strong tradition 
bring enchantment to the hearts of many while 
leaving memories of love and loyalty that last a 
lifetime. An intimacy flows throughout the campus 
that unites the students and staff into family. As 
students go through the journey of growth and 
discovery in their college years, they may encoun- 
ter changes in their lives. While some things may 
change in their time at Centenary one thing will 
always stay the same: they will always have a 
family here and a home where everybody knows 

their name. 



by: Nikki Doughty 




T3 
3- 
O 



O 

tl 

C 



33 

CD 

5 

CO 



MAKING FRIENDS. 



Sophomore Liz 



Daughenbaugh gets to 



know one of the neighbor- 



hood children who came 



out to campus for the easier 



egg hunt that was orga- 



nized and promoted entirely 



by students. 



Opening 1 3 



MAKING NEW 
Students 
get to know their neigh- 
bors during the Trick 
or Terror event held 
on campus. The event 
offered area kids a 
place to have a safe 
Halloween. Freshman 
Amy Sullivan paints 
the face of a child at- 
tending the event. 
"Helping the kids to 
have a safe Hallow- 
een was really fun. I'm 
glad I had an opportu- 
nity to participate," 
says Sullivan. 






^r 









I 




^tNH^H 






4 [student Life 








knows what's ^ happening 

By: Nikki Doughty 
Forming long-lasting friendships and close-knit bonds 
proved to be a fun and exciting task for students this 
year as there were a variety of activities and events for 
everyone to enjoy. Freshmen wasted no time getting to 
know their new family in a fun-filled Orientation week. 
Working out with buddies in the new fitness center 
became a popular activity for those who wanted to get 
in shape, and playing intramural sports on the Jones- 
Rice field gave students the chance to show off their 
athletic skills. Members of the campus community also 
got to know not only each other's artistic sides through 
the coffeehouses, but their dark sides as well through 
scary Freak Week events. The Centenary family came 
together as faculty and students opened their arms to 
neighborhood kids during Halloween, and they worked 
hard to show prospective students why they should 
choose Centenary to be their home, too. No matter 
what, when, or where the event, students always knew 
what was happening and came together to make it a fun 
time and a great memory to hold onto forever. 




Divider 1 5 




PUCKERED OUT. Sophomore 
Jonathan Hammett shows how much fun 
he experienced during training! Being a 
leader required a lot of long, hard hours, 
and some people would do anything for a 
few extra minutes of sleep. 




BUTTHEAD. Freshman Valerie 
McDonald and others try to focus on 
whether they are a butt or a head. The 
rules of this game were simple, yet mul- 
tiples of new students struggled to play. 



GET CON- 
NECTED! Cen- 
tenary Connec- 
tions offered new 
students a chance 
to bond in a unique 
way. These stu- 
dents triumphed 
in figuring out the 
quickest way to 
say everyone's 
name while giving 
everyone theirtum 
to touch the ball! 



T 


BaBIIHiBlJiBM 


OF ORIENTATION 


10. Centenary Connections. 


9. 


New Faces. 


8. 


New Places. 


7. 


The 20-foot inflatable slide. 


6. 


The Papa John's pizza guy. 


5. 


The goth chick in Tough Talk. 


4. 


Honor Code - Is this serious? 


3. 


Interactive Matrix. 


2. 


The last day of Parents' Orientation. 


1. 


RIDE, RIDE, RIDE that pony! 





BEND THE SPOON. Orientation Leaders Rolin Moe, 
a senior, and Lisa Game, a sophomore, found ways to 
amuse themselves during The Matrix . Being unsuccessful 
at bending the spoon, Lisa decided to perform other tricks. 



photo by: Student Life 

REMEMBER ME? 

Freshman Parrin Patterson strikes his pose on the Jones- 
Rice field during the first of many group icebreakers. 
Icebreaker games are a fun and creative way for students to 
get to know each other while they answer questions about 
themselves and work together as a team to win races and 

solve fun puzzles. 




What did you enjoy most about being 
an Orientation Leader? 

"Going through Orientation Training brought 
me awareness to all that Centenary has to 
offer. When I went through Orientation I did 
not take full advantage of the program, and 
I missed out on a lot of neat opportunities 
during my first year here." 
-Sophomore Jonathan Hammett 



G lSMent Life 



What Did You 

Like Most About 

Orientation? 




photo by: Nikki Doughty 




photo by: Laura Harper 




photo by: Laura Harper 



"Our first group 
meeting witn the 
new students where 
we force them to 
bond through some 
crazy messy 

Olympic" 
icebreakers. ..The 
exercises get stu- 
dents talking and 

laughing in no time!" 
-Elizabeth Quillin, 
Junior 



"Orientation is a way 
to meet the incom- 
ing freshmen and 
make them feel wel- 
come in a home 
away from home." 
-Ceci Salinas, 
Junior 

"I loved the dance!! 
It was great music, 
and everyone was 
dancing and hav- 
ing fun!" 

-Jennifer Hamblin, 
Freshman 



"I think the motiva- 
tional speaker and 
the Tough Talk skit 
helped me the 
most. I needed the 
motivation, and 
Tough Talk ad- 
dressed important 
issues I had not 
thought about." 
-Sarah Earhart, 
Freshman 




starting a new year 



RiENTATiON 



By: Yvonne Juneau 




THE BEST REASON TO HAVE BEEN AT 
TOUGH TALK: 

"To learn what could happen to you if you aren't 
careful and how you could handle any situation 

better." 
-Sophomore Ayman Najjar 

"You could have seen sweet and innocent Montie 

[Thomas] as not so sweet and innocent." 

-Senior Katie Coffman 



FINDING COMMON GROUND. 

Freshman Brandee Dykes finds common 
ground with others at the commuter social. 
Commuters share a common bond since 
they live off campus , and Orientation tries 
to bring the group together. 

RIDING THE PONY! New students 
were taught the fine art of riding the pony, 
a game involving dancing and cheering. 
During this game the orientation groups 
that meet in Smith came together to play, 
giving them a chance to bond while hav- 
ing fun at the same time. 




STAND RIGHT 
UP. The grand 
finale for Centenary 
Connections in- 
volved every new 
student connecting 
as one. This game 
has become a tradi- 
tion for new student 
orientation, and 
while this year's 
class put up a good 
fight, they did not 
perform theirtask as 
well as the class of 
'02. 

RIDE THAT 
LEADER! Orien- 
tation Leaders' fa- 
vorite game to play 
was RIDE THAT 
PONY. Every free 
second to be found, 
although not many, 
revolved around 
butt-bumping and 
finding out who 
could be the best 
pony! 

'*7 



Orientation u 





everybody loves them 
r r r/^ r > rf^ 

ciijiI I Do 



: Aimee Miceli 

SUNSHINE DAY. Juniors DelanieHebert and Ceci Salinas 
catch some rays at the lake with Freshman Vanessa Curtis. 
Hebert says, "One of my favorite weekends was when we went 
to Arkansas for Bid Day. It was so fun having everyone 
together, especially when we rode the carousel; OH MY GAWD!" 



ROCKING THE WEEKEND 
AWAY. Many people can't resist chi 
ing in the rocking chairs outside. Junior 
Trey Wellborn and Freshman Ashly Neal 
rock their weekends away on the front 
porch of James. 

FLYING HIGH. Sophomore Cristal 
Willcox and Junior Emily Phifer take a 
moment out to relax on the swing out- 
side the cafe. 



M M I plan on getting all of my work 
V^lfc done on Saturday, but that never 
happens. Saturday is spent sitting on my rear 
end staring at the wall and watching Veggie 
Tale tapes. Sure, I don't have a life, but I like 
it that way. 

-Ashlie Daigle, Freshman 



SLEEPING THE WEEKEND AWAY. Like many 
sleep-deprived college students, Junior Jean Ancelet catches 
up on his sleep on the weekends. "I take naps wherever and 
whenever possible," says Ancelet. 

8 1 Student Life 




O' CHRISTMAS TREE. Junior 
Jennifer West gets in the Christmas 
spirit by using some spare weekend 
time to clown around Wal-Mart 
Supercenter and check out the large 
supply of Christmas trees. 



■ BASKETS OF FUN. Junior Marie Biamonte likes to use herweekends tostock 
S- up on the necessities of college life. "I like to buy in bulk," states Biamonte. 



3- 




A 




What Do You Like To Do On Weekends? 











V v** 5 *^- 


**■ M 


4 


I ^ 


■<?» M j 




wk 


1 .... 


4 




W 




photo by: Ashley Knecht 

"I like to do as many mind- 
less activities as possible, 
like watching movies." 
-Mindy Montgomery, 
Junior 




photo by: Ashley Knecht 

"I row for the Centenary 

Crew Team." 

-Dayna Edwards, Junior 



MOVING TO 
THE MUSIC. 

Juniors Meagan 
Gillett, Melissa 
Duplantis, and 
Crystal Carter take 
a break from the 
band at The Nobel 
Savage to smile for 
the camera. "We 
love going to the 
Nobel Savage on 
the weekends," 
says Carter, "espe- 
cially when the 
band is good." 





photo courtesy of: Sarah Lagerson 
PULL UP SOME GRASS AND SMILE. Senior Sarah 
Lagerson, Sophomores Rebekah Lagerson, Abby McMurry, 
Lauren Stallings and Junior Amanda Mustin pick a spot to chill 
while on a weekend Choir tour. Mustin says, "Choir people have 
tours on a lot of weekends, which is really good because your 
choir friends are some of your best friends, but it can get really 
aggravating being around each other all the time." 

EATING IS EVERYTHING. Junior Jennifer West, Fresh- 
men Gentry Haughton, Laura Harper, Seniors Amanda Lee 
Rankin, and Lisa Polake enjoy dinner at one of their favorite 
restaurants, Chili's. "I love spending the weekends with my 
[sorority] sisters," says Harper. "We always have a great time." 



Weekends 9 



"1 — ^ 



frisbee club flies high 




By: Nikki Doughty 



GET DOWN AND DIRTY! Junior 
Travis Leger takes a deep dive into the 
mud as he tries to catch the disk. Often the 
Jones-Rice field was muddy, and frisbee 
players had to risk getting a little dirty in 
order to win. 

SHAKE IT OUT. Junior Travis Leger 
and his opponent shake hands after an 
exhausting round at frisbee. 











# 


mm 

■ ■ ■' :i. :- ' ■ . :■ ' . 














: : * 




















photo courtesy of: Frisbee team 



FLYING SAU- 
CERS! Team- 
mates keep their 
eye on the disk as it 
flies down from the 
sky into the hands 
of the players. Play- 
ers have to be sure 
they stay full of en- 
ergy during the 
game so they can 
race down the field 
and dive for the 
disks. 



GETTING 
READY. 
Frisbee 
players get 
into their 
places on 
the Jones- 
Rice field 
before a new 
game be- 




gins. 




n> and Rice hug and 
goof around as § 
they celebrate 
their victory on the 
field. 



photo courtesy of: Frisbee team 
Junior Matthew Philbrook crouches to 
the ground as the disk flies right past him. It looks easy 
to throw and catch the disks, but appearances can be 
deceiving! 



i&K 













photo courtesy of: Frisbee team 
A frisbee teammate flies high off 
the ground to save the disk for his team. The players' 
aggressiveness on the field helped make the frisbee 
matches popular and exciting for students to watch. 




10 1 Student Life 



Team members stand to- 
gether with the disk that brought them victory after a tough 
match on the Jones-Rice field. 




Nothing is getting past this f risbee team member! She makes 



a solid catch that was passed to her from her teammate 



Junior Travis Leger catches air on the 
Jones-Rice field as he struggles to get his hands on the 



during an aggressive match. As shown by the mud on her flying disk. Acrobatic skills tend to come in handy during the 



frisbee matches. 



shirt, she is not afraid to do whatever it takes to put her team 



ahead of the game. 




GOT IT! Senior Colin Delaney makes 
a two-handed catch as he practices with 
other frisbee teammates during an after- 
noon between classes. 





1 TAKING 
| ADSVE. A 

o 

I frisbee 

•^ player takes 
o 

a hard dive 



the 



& to 

£■ ground in 

Q 

3 order to 
catch the 
disk for her 
team. 




PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRAC- 
TICE. Senior Dave McCormick hangs 
out in front of James Dorm as he practices 
his frisbee techniques for the next game. 

'"§■ JUST OUT OF 

o 
o 

S REACH. The 

?? 

o disk flies just out of 

-n 

S- the reach of a team 



§ member's hands 



during one of the 



games. 

Frisbee Gut) 111 



GUIDING LIGHT. JuniorJean Ancelet leads a group through the library while 
explaining how its computers work. "They're like stray dogs looking for a way 
around campus as well as their way in life," he says of our prospective students. 
"Hopefully, they will leave here thinking of Centenary as a way into their future." 



o 



What Do You Think About Prospective Weekend? 





photo by: Patty Stewart 

"It was great to see friends 
from high school who also 
look at Centenary as a 
great college." 
-Sophomore Randi Smith 



photo by: Michelle Magee 

"There wil be fewer park- 
ing spaces next year; ex- 
pect it." 
-Sophomore Marc Guin 



THE WEL- 
COMING 
COMMITTEE. 

"Welcome to the 
Centenary Family!" 
Senior Rob Rubel 
exclaims as he 
greets prospective 
students in the li- 
brary. He enjoys 
being one of the 
first people to meet 
our honored 

guests. 







«## 




o 



photo by: Sean Gilder 
HOME SWEET HOME. Students hang around after the 
college forum to discuss any added concerns or questions with 
their guests. "The people on the panel do a really good job of 
portraying what it feels like to be at Centenary," Senior Nola 
Sieber explains. "For me, Centenary is a place I feel is home. I 
just want other people to share that same feeling." 

SECOND TIME AROUND. Junior Chip LeDuff, an 
employee of the fitness center, explains its new features. 
"This Open House was a lot better than the previous one. The 
staff and older students were more involved and seemed to 
enjoy it more, which makes the students feel more comfort- 
able viewing our school as their new home," says LeDuff. 




12 I Student Life 





putting it into prospective 

nmF 



V 



PJihK 



By: Michelle Magee 



MAKING IT A SUCCESS. Junior Nancy Brammer 
shows off pictures while explaining the Service Learning 
requirement to prospective students. Tim Crowley, the ad- 
ministrator in charge of Open House, comments, "This type of 
program could never exceed without the students' participa- 
tion. It is because of them that this day is so successful." 





BRANCHING OUT. Junior Ashley 
Palmer and Freshman Melissa Tharp show 
their tour group the downstairs area of the 
library. Tharp, who stays busy with soccer, 
says, "It's nice to get away for a while and 
meet new people who have different talents." 

CRYSTAL CLEAR. Senior Dave 
McCormick shows off the rooms and bath- 
rooms of Cline. "Open House is a great 
opportunity in which all prospectives 
should participate," he states. "They al- 
ways show up with endless questions 
and concerns, but they leave with a better 
understanding of how life at Centenary is 
different from that of other colleges." 






Centenary is our home, and Open 



House is our chance to welcome 



others into that home. I hope they enjoy their 



visit so much that they decide to stay. 

-Lisa Game, Sophomore 



» 



STORY TIME. Junior ambassa- 
dor Mandy Yearwood enjoys telling 
people about her fun experiences at 
college. "I was very happy to see the 
large number of prospective students 
at both open houses," she says. "They 
all seemed very interested in every- 
thing Centenary has to offer." 



THE SCENIC ROUTE. Students, prospectives, and their 
parents hurry out of the SUB on their walking tour of campus. 
"People really appreciate the quality of our school," Sophomore 
Amy Waguespack comments. "Throughout the tour people 
constantly remarked that the grounds of the campus were 
beautiful and that the squirrels were an entertaining sight." 



Open House 1 13 




Hypnotist C.J. 
Johnson keeps students mesmerized 
during his performance in the Hurley 
Auditorium. "C.J. gave us enough black- 
mail material for a lifetime," Junior Jus- 
tin Beckham says. 




Why 
are we writing on these balloons again? 
Sophomore Suzie Golas and Senior 
Katie Furr work hard to set up decorated 
balloons and posters in the SUB to ad- 
vertise all of the Freak Week events. 



Money-hungry Se- 
niors Carter Benton, 
Brent Sharp, and 
Sophomores Drew 
Sutton and Kyle 
Aaron anxiously 
crowd around Scott 
Greenwood, Dean of 
Student Life, at a 
blackjack table. "I'm 
a little concerned that 
some of our students 
are such experienced 
gamblers," com- 
ments Greenwood. 





photo by: Sean Gilder 



Superstition and gambling seem to go hand-in-hand for lots 

of people. Whether it's kissing the dice or blowing into their 

palms, many people have good luck superstitions they like to 

perform before they press their luck. Sophomore Victoria 
Junior Melissa Duplantis, CAB Vice-Presi- 
dent, works diligently to decorate a banner for a Freak Week Kintner chooses to say a little prayer for the lucky numbers 
advertisement. "The publicity marathon before Freak Week 
was a lot of work, but the spray paint fumes helped it 
become a bonding experience," comments Duplantis. during Casino Night in the SUB. 



as she shakes the dice in her hand at the popular craps table 




HlStiident Life 




photo by: Ashley Knecht 




photo by: Ashley Knecht 




"I liked the way that 
all the participants 
were such good 
sports throughout 
the week.." 



"I liked the number 
of events because 
it kept me inter- 
ested throughout 
the whole week." 



"The campus was 
alive for a week." 



"There were lots of 
different things to 
do, and you could 
bring all your 
friends. ..and get- 
ting T-shirts." 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 



J 



^ 



everybody wants to be a freak 



I 



IEAK 



WEE] 






By: Mindy Montgomery 



Always working to 
give away money to students, Financial 
Aid Director Mary Sue Rix shows Garrett 
Pickard, Carlos Isaacs, and Mike McGuire 
how the blackjack game is played. "The 
new way to dole out financial aid," Rix 
says of the Casino Night event. 

"So what 
are these random peole doing in the Hurley 
lobby?!" questions Sophomore Cristal 
Willcox to Junior Sandi Snipe before the 
hypnotist show as Junior Crystal Carter 
and Sophomore Mark Henry bravely pre- 
pare together to be hypnotized. 



IF I COULD CHANGE ONE THING 
ABOUT FREAK WEEK IT WOULD BE... 

"To make Trick or Terror' part of Freak Week because 

that really brought Centenary together as a whole, and 

the community and Centenary students together had a 

wonderful time." 



"To have more T-shirts at the events because not 
everyone who came got a T-shirt." 




Sharing 
scary stories is an 
event of sheer ter- 
ror and fun for Freak 
Week participants. 
Students crowd qui- 
etly together in the 
Shell as they pay 
close attention to 
the terrifying story 
being read to them 
during Tales of Ter- 
ror night. 

Junior Yvonne Ju- 
neau and Kelly Sto- 
ver get to the hyp- 
notizing event in the 
Hurley Auditorium 
in plenty of time to 
snag front row 
seats and clown 
around for a while 
before the show 
starts. Juneau re- 
marks, "Kelly's a 
goof ball." 



Freak Week 15 



lau 



mm 



by; Michelle Mageel 



BUNNY 
EARS. The 
neighborhood 
Easter egg hunt 
served the chil- 
dren and fami- 
lies who live near 
the school, It 
was organized, 
promoted, and 
run entirely by 
students. 





Ph, 



S5 *°*P t 



breaking 
ground; 

Out going and incoming SGA 
Presidents, Senior Dawson Taylor and Junior Mandy 
Yearwood, respectively, join the groundbreaking cer- 
emony in the spring for the new arts complex. 



photo courtesy of: Public Relations 





FLASH 



16 Current Events 



Dr. George Newtown 

was honored in the 

spring with the 

Outstanding Teacher 

Award in 2000. Dr. 

Barrie Richardson 

was jonored with the 

award in 2001. 

photo courtesy of: 

Public Relations 



TAKE A LOOK. 

Due to the rain 

pouring outside, 

the baseball team 

gathered indoors 

in the Carlile 

Auditorium on 

February 15 for a 

"virtual unveiling" 

in honor of the W. 

Peyton Shehee, Jr. 

Stadium. 



photo courtesy of: Public Relations 




>» 2000-2001 



NEWS I > > > 




2000-2001 




NEWS II »> 




D The Millennium Bridge, a 
footbridge across the River Thames 
connecting London's St. Paul 
Cathedral with the Tate Modern Art 
Gallery, opens in June. It is the first 
bridge to be built over the Thames 
in 100 years. 




D Gas prices soar across Europe. Heavy taxation policies in France and 
England cause massive protests and transportation blockades. Both 
governments eventually promise relief. 





H Former KGB agent Vladimir Putin 
is sworn into office as Russia's new 
president in May 2000, succeeding 
long-time leader Boris Yeltsin. 
Despite fears of an authoritarian 
style, Putin's public approval ratings 
remain high. 







A Floods in Southeast Asia are 
caused by days of pounding rain. 
Millions are forced to leave their 
homes and more than a thousand 
people die in the region's worst 
flooding in decades. 



A President Clinton travels to 
Southeast Asia in November to help 
mend relations between the United 
States and Vietnam. He is the first 
U.S. president to visit Vietnam since 
the end of the war in 1975. 



A A cable car carrying skiers 
and snowboarders in Austria 
catches fire inside a tunnel, 
killing more than 150 people 
on board. It is the worst Alpine 
disaster in the country's history. 



FLASH 



>>> 



H Australian 
street artists 
called "Strange 
Fruit" perform 
gravity-defying 
feats around 
the world. The 
performers float 
above the audience 
on 15-foot 
fiberglass poles. 



A Yugoslav President Slobodan 
Milosevic is ousted from office in 
October, ending 13 years of violent 
rule. Vojislav Kostunica becomes 
Yugoslavia's first democratically 
elected president. 



President Clinton makes a last- 
ditch effort to broker a Middle East 
peace deal before his term ends 
in January 2001 by drafting a plan for 
leaders of both Israel and Palestine 
to review. Israeli Prime Minister 
Ehud Barak and Palestinian Yasser 
Arafat agree to review Clinton's 
proposal, but no deal is signed 
before month's end. 

A Singapore Airlines jumbo jet 
crashes during takeoff in Taiwan, 
killing 81 of the 179 people on board. 
In a blinding rainstorm the pilot uses 
the wrong runway and collides with 
construction equipment. 




H Canada mourns the death of former 
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who 
served the country for nearly 16 years. 
Trudeau, who was 80, is remembered 
for his flamboyant style and his 
commitment to keeping Canada a 
single nation. 




>> 2000-2001 



GOVERNMENT LAW TRANSPORTATION 




Q In August, the Russian nuclear submarine 
Kursk sinks to the bottom of the Barents Sea 
after an unexplained explosion. All 118 crew 
members are killed. 



FLASH 



>>> 



D Two hundred North and South 
Koreans separated from family 
members since the 1950-1953 
Korean war reunite in August. The 
four-day visits are a goodwill gesture 
by both countries' leaders, who met 
for the first time in June. 




AIDS reaches epidemic proportions 
in southern Africa. Leaders and 
citizens throughout the world 
conduct a massive educational 
campaign on World AIDS Day 
December 1 to teach people about 
the disease that is killing 6,000 
sub-Saharan Africans each day. 

Uganda is struck by an occurrence 
of the deadly Ebola virus that is 
linked to more than 100 deaths. 
The outbreak is traced to a Gulu 
woman who died in September 
and whose body infected other 
people during the ritual cleansing 
of the dead. 













A In January 2001, a 7.9 magnitude 
earthquake devastates Gujarat in 
western India. The huge quake 
causes an estimated $5.5 billion 
in damages and kills more than 
20,000 people. 



A in August, Somalia elects its first 
president in nine years. President 
Abdiqasim Salad Hassan promises 
to bring peace and economic 
recovery to the African nation. 



A Former Coca-Cola executive 
Vicente Fox, of the National 
Action Party, is elected president 
of Mexico in July, ending the 
Institutional Revolutionary Party's 
71 -year reign. 



A More than 150 world leaders meet 
at the U.N. Millennium Summit in 
September to discuss war, poverty, 
disease and other global problems. 
The meeting is the largest gathering 
of world leaders in history. 




H The worst wave of Middle Eastern violence in years erupts between 
Israelis and Palestinians, leaving more than 350 dead. A visit by Israeli 
opposition leader Ariel Sharon to a Jerusalem holy site on September 28 
is claimed to have sparked the fighting. 



D In July, an Air France Concorde supersonic jet catches fire and crashes 
outside Paris, killing 113 people. The crash is blamed on metal debris which 
punctured the tires and damaged the fuel tanks. 



2000-2001 




NEWS >» 



Missoulian, Michael Gallacher/AP/Wide World Photos 



^ The U.S. Senate passes the 
Permanent Normal Trade Relations 
in September to open up trade 
between the United States and China. 
The bill is expected to increase U.S. 
exports by $13 billion annually. 




D In the worst forest fire season in 50 years, more than 20,000 firefighters 
j battle blazes in the western United States. More than 80 major wildfires 
: burn across 13 states, forcing hundreds of people to leave their homes. 




G5 Firestone initiates the largest tire 
recall in history after dozens of 
rollover accidents appear to be 
caused by faulty treads. At least 1 48 
deaths in the United States are linked 
to the defective tires, although other 
problems with sport utility vehicles 
also are under investigation. 






Atomic Weapons 
j and Special Nuclear 
■ Materials Rewards Act 







* ■ T -i 




A Summer air travelers wait out 
some of the worst flight delays on 
record. Bad weather and heavy air 
traffic cause delays that reach a 
peak in June, when only 66% of 
the flights arrive on time. 



A Illegal downloading and missing 
computer tapes threaten the security 
of the Los Alamos nuclear weapons 
lab in New Mexico. Several 
workers at the lab are penalized 
for mishandling nuclear secrets. 



A The Women's Museum: An 
Institute for the Future opens in 
September in Dallas. The museum 
profiles 3,000 remarkable 
American women and features 
more than 20 interactive exhibits. 



A Many brands of taco shells and 
corn chips are pulled from store 
shelves and restaurants after a 
consumer group detects traces 
of genetically modified corn not 
approved for human consumption. 




FIASH 



>>> 




H Convicted of 
monopoly practices 
in the software 
industry, Microsoft 
Corporation is 
ordered by a federal 
district judge in June 
to break into two 
separate companies. 
Company chairman 
Bill Gates files for 
an appeal. 






A wave of Internet startup 
companies, once the darlings 
of the online economy, file for 
bankruptcy after falling short 
of stockholders' earnings 
expectations. The NASDAQ stock 
exchange, where most dot-coms 
are traded, loses 39% of its value 
for the year. 

Millions of Califomians go for hours 
without power in January 2001 as 
utility companies cut off electrical 
supply due to low reserves. The 
crisis, blamed on aging generating 
plants, deregulation, soaring 
wholesale prices and debt-ridden 
utilities, spurs other states to 
begin devising prevention plans. 





D The Oklahoma City National 
Memorial is unveiled in April 2000. 
The memorial is built to honor the 168 
people who died in the 1995 bombing 
of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. 




» 2000-2001 No* 



GOVERNMENT POLITICS BUSINESS 



Amy Sancetta/AP/Wlde World Photos 




Q On December 4, 2000, the U.S. presidency remains in 
limbo as both Florida and New Mexico officials recount 
ballots to determine who will win their state's electoral 
votes. New Mexico goes to Gore. Ultimately, Bush wins 
Florida which gives him a narrow victory. 



FIASH 



>>> 



D In the closest presidential election 
in more than 100 years, Republican 
George W. Bush of Texas beats 
Democrat At Gore from Tennessee. 
The race isn't decided until 36 days 
after the popular election, when 
Florida's hotly contested $W$F 
25 electoral votes are awarded to Bush 




On election night, several TV 
networks prematurely declare Al Gore 
the winner in Florida, only later to 
reverse themselves, twice. The 
fiasco confirms many Americans' 
distrust of polling and early "calling" 
of elections. 

In one of his first duties as President- 
elect, George W. Bush nominates 
Colin Powell to be Secretary of State. 
The four-star Army General becomes 
the first African-American in history 
to serve in this role. 




[Jj = Recount 




D In October, the USS Cole is bombed while refueling in Yemen. A number of 
terrorist groups are suspected of the blast that kills 17 sailors and injures 39. 



2000-2001 



I 




>» 




1 Walkie-talkies make 
a comeback as an 
economical alternative 
to cell phones. The new 
generation talkies come 
in wild styles and have 
a range of two or 
more miles. 




D In August, a mile-wide patch of open water is spotted at the North Pole, 
dramatizing concerns about global warming. 



H New photos of fiery streams of gas 
that can reach 300,000 miles high may 
explain why the sun's atmosphere is 
hotter than its surface. 



A In July, Stephen King shakes up 
the publishing world by releasing 
one of the first online books, The 
Plant. More than 150,000 copies 
are downloaded the first week at 
$1 per chapter. 



A in a Guatemalan jungle, 
archeologists uncover remains of an 
ancient Mayan palace. Bigger than 
two football fields, the palace is one 
of the largest ever discovered. 



A Internet appliances that provide 
surfing and e-mailing capabilities 
make their way to homes and schools. 
The devices offer less expensive 
Internet access to consumers without 
home computers. 



A in 2000, more than 200 animal 
species join the Iberian Lynx on the 
World Conservation Union's List of 
Threatened Species. Their addition 
brings the world total to 11,046 plants 
and animals having threatened status. 




FLASH 



>>> 



H Personal Digital 
Assistants (PDAs) 
capable of calendar 
scheduling, note taking, 
e-mailing, phoning and 
Web browsing go 
mainstream in 2000. 
Competition among 
manufacturers heats 
up with Microsoft, 
piackBerry, Palm and 
other brands vying 
for shares of the teen 
and business markets. 



Paleontologists identify a new 
species of dinosaur from fossils 
found in northern Italy. The 
26-foot-long, meat-eating 
Saltriosaur is one of the world's 
oldest dinosaurs, dating back 200 
million years. 

Scientists are forced to rethink the 
traditional definitions of a star and 
planet when 18 massive planet-like 
bodies that don't revolve around 
a sun are discovered in the Sigma 
Orionis cluster. 




D Final touches are made to the 
International Space Station for its 
first residents. American astronaut 
Bill Shepherd and two Russian 
cosmonauts live on the space station 
for four months starting in November. 



» 2000-2001 



SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT 



."^^N 



d Wireless devices that send 
real-time personal messages 
between users become the latest 
communication craze. The "instant 
messages" can be typed, written or 
spoken, depending on the brand, 
and devices cost less than $100. 



Q In 2000, both Honda and Toyota launch gas-electric 
hybrid cars. Operated by a battery-powered electric motor 
and a gas-run engine, the hybrids get up to 70 miles per 
gallon on the highway and release minimal emissions. 



FIASH 



>>> 



New Internet domain names are 
created to lessen the load on the 
old .com standard. The new names, 
slated for use in mid-2001, include 
.info for general use, .biz for 
businesses, .name for individuals 
and .pro for professionals. 

Scientists complete a rough "map" 
of the genetic code that makes 
a person human. The map will aid 
in the detection and prevention of 
cancer and other illnesses. 




D Amtrak introduces the nation's first high-speed train in 
November. The "Acela Express" travels up to 150 miles per 
hour and runs between Washington, D.C., New York and Boston 
with other routes planned for coming years. 



2000-2001 



IE! 



una 



NEWS >» 




□ New prepaid credit cards and 
online credit lines are the latest 
high-tech means for parents to 
control their teens' spending. 
Depending on the account, parents 
determine the spending limit or 
the online stores where the money 
can be spent and receive monthly 
statements of purchases made. 



CS A new Web site, Customatix.com, lets users design their own 
sneakers. Starting from scratch or selecting a prefab model, users 
can pick everything from the colors and styling to the fabric and 
personalized logo at a cost of $80 to $95 a pair. 




D MH-18, billed as the first national 
lifestyle magazine for guys 13 to 
1 8, hits newsstands in August. The 
Men's Health offshoot covers sports, 
fitness, school, relationships and 
issues teenage boys face growing up. 



HRVpRi 




H Wordstretch bracelets become 
a trendy accessory in Hollywood 
and around the nation. The 
multi-colored elastic bands come 
inscribed with "Call me," "Money is 
overrated," "Snap out of it" and 
other simple messages designed 
to spark conversation. 



TRENDS 



>> 1 2000-2001 



FASHION MEDIA 



David Young-Wolff/PhotoEdit 



S3 Message T-shirts become fashion statements 
among teen girls. "Foxy Lady," "Princess" and "Monkey 
Around" are just a few of the tongue-in-cheek logos 
that appear on the popular shirts. 



By the end of 2000, an estimated 
75% of U.S. universities offer 
courses online and more than 5.8 
million students have logged on. 

With the 2000 unemployment rate 
at a low of 4%, college students 
working as summer interns 
command wages up to $20 an 
hour, along with compensation 
packages, from high-tech and 
Internet companies. 





n Chrysler rolls out its 1930s retro car, the PT Cruiser, in spring 2000. 
The five-door "personal transportation" wagon is a hot seller, beating the 
popular Volkswagen New Beetle by two to one in the first month. It also 
wins Motor Trend magazine's 2001 Car of the Year. 



HAVE- A 

ST-R/VTFG/ 



2000-2001 



mmm 



.., :•;.:"-• «"""" 



NEWS >» 



Q A new computer video game called 
"The Sims," which simulates the life of 
a suburban family, develops a fanatical 
following with teens. Players create the 
characters and guide them through 
building a house, furnishing it, finding 
a career and running a family in their 
pursuit of happiness. 




D The Millennium Force, the world's tallest and fastest roller 
coaster, opens in May 2000 at the Cedar Point amusement park 
in Sandusky, Ohio. The ride has a 300-foot drop and travels up 
to 92 miles per hour. 




Maxis/Electronic Arts 



H Jim Carrey stirs up trouble in the 
town of Whoville in an adaptation of 
the Dr. Seuss classic, How the Grinch 
Stole Christmas. The Grinch, which 
opens in November, is the highest 
grossing film of 2000. 



CBS Photo Archive 




*■* A % 



X *' 






isBrother 



A Meet the Parents, starring Robert 
De Niro and Ben Stiller, opens in 
October. The movie wins Favorite 
Comedy Motion Picture at the 
People's Choice Awards, and De Niro 
earns a Golden Globe nomination. 



A in July, CBS launches "Big Brother," A uPN's weekly series "WWF 

a reality-based show in which 10 Smackdown!" starring professional 

people share living quarters for three wrestler The Rock is the network's 

months until all but one are voted most-watched show in 2000, with 

out. Viewers can monitor contestants 7.3 million viewers. 
24/7 on the show's Web site. 



A in December, Cast Away \s 
released, starring Tom Hanks as a 
crash victim stranded on a desert 
island for four years. For his nearly 
one-man performance Hanks wins 
Best Actor at the Golden Globes. 




FLASH 



>>> 



B Gamers camp outside 
electronics stores to 
secure the long-awaited 
Sony PlayStation 2, which 
goes on sale in October 
in limited quantities. The 
new version allows users 
to listen to CDs and watch 
DVD movies in addition to 
playing games. 



The first big hit in 2001 is Save 
the Last Dance, which opens in 
January. The teen romance, 
starring Julia Stiles and Sean 
Patrick Thomas, earns close to 
$50 million in its first two weeks. 

Pay It Forward, a movie based on 
the idea of performing random 
acts of kindness, opens in October 
starring Haley Joel Osment, 
Kevin Spacey and Helen Hunt. 




GS Tom Cruise reprises his role as 
Ethan Hunt in the action sequel 
Mission: Impossible 2. The May 
release is summer's biggest box-office 
draw and 2000's second-highest 
grossing film, earning more than 
$215 million. 





MOVIES 



>> 2000-2001 



TELEVISION GAMES 




D Popular television series prompt the introduction 
of board game versions. "Survivor" and "Who Wants 
To Be a Millionaire" lead the list of new releases. 



F1ASH 



>>> 



H NBC's White House drama "The 
West Wing," starring Martin Sheen, 
Allison Janney and Richard Schiff, 
sets a record for receiving the most 
Emmys in a single season with nine 
wins, including Outstanding Drama Series. 




In November, illusionist David 
Blaine is encased in ice for 62 
hours in New York's Times Square, 
assisted only with air and 
water tubes and a catheter. Blaine, 
who was seeking notoriety over 
national TV, survives the stunt but 
requires hospitalization. 

Russell Crowe becomes a 
household name with the release 
of Gladiator. The epic film wins 
a Golden Globe Award for Best 
Drama as well as an acting nod 
for Crowe. 



m 



•vri 




A NBC's "Will & Grace" is one of 
television's 10 most watched shows 
in 2000. Actors Sean Hayes and 
Megan Mullally win Emmys for their 
roles as Jack and Karen. 



A Scary Movie, the Wayans brothers' 
spoof on horror movies, is among 
the year's 10 highest grossing films. 
The July release earns more than 
$157 million and is voted the Teen 
Choice Awards Movie of the Summer. 



A Fox's "Dark Angel" is voted 
Favorite New Television Dramatic 
Series at the 2001 People's Choice 
Awards. The series, set in the year 
2019, explores the life of a genetically 
enhanced heroine named Max. 



A in July, Wolverine, Cyclops, 
Storm and other super-powerful 
comic book characters are brought 
to life in X-Men. The movie grosses 
over $157 million, one of the year's 
10 biggest box-office draws. 




Q Charlie's Angels, based on the popular 70s TV series, is one of the top 
20 box-office draws in 2000. The movie, starring director Drew Barrymore, 
Cameron Diaz and Lucy Liu, earns $40 million its opening week in 
November and grosses more than $123 million during its run. 



D The year's hottest TV show is CBS's 
"Survivor," in which 16 contestants 
compete for a million dollars by surviving 
on a tropical island for 39 days. More than 
51 million viewers tune in for the final episode. 
Based on its success, CBS launches a second 
"Survivor" series in January 2001 set in the 
Australian Outback. 





2000-2001 



NEWS >» 



I Q A new board game called "Hip- 
| Hop Hall of Fame" capitalizes on 
I the popularity of the music genre. 
j Players make their way around 
an album-like board by answering 
questions about Hip-Hop performers, 
songs, culture and history. 




iff ^ 




Q In response to the growing interest in Latin music, CBS airs the 
"1st Annual Latin Grammy Awards" in September. The show is the first 
primetime network Spanish language telecast on American TV and draws 
7.5 million viewers. 



Hip-Hop remains one of the year's 
dominant sounds, with acts such as 
DMX, Jay-Z and Ludacris all making 
Billboard's Top 40 with new songs 
and selling more than a million 
copies of their latest CDs. 




» 2000-2001 



ARTISTS ALBUMS CONCERTS 




B Opening week sales records are shattered in 2000 with El AC II 
benchmarks set tor the number of albums sold. Britney ■ Hi Oil 
Spears' Oops...l Did it Again, Eminem's The Marshall Mathers 
LP, Limp Bizkit's Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored 
Water and Backstreet Boys' Black & BlueaM break the 
million-unit mark. 



>>> 



S3 Napster loses several court battles with the recording 
industry over copyright infringement. The popular online 
music sharing service, with over 60 million users, faces 
shut-down unless it can create a new business formula 
that satisfies the major recording labels. 




The Beatles begin 2001 atop the 
Billboard album chart with the 
album 1. The CD sells more 
than 5 million copies over the 
holiday season. 

Sisqo, a member of the R&B 
band Dru Hill, goes solo in 2000. 
The singer tops the singles chart 
with "Incomplete" and "Thong 
Song" and takes home awards 
from Billboard and the American 
Music Association. 



Chip Wass 






1 1 W- 




A MTV's "Total Request Live," 
which allows viewers to vote for 
their favorite music videos, 
continues to gain popularity. 
Host Carson Daly becomes one 
of the year's best-known faces. 



A Destiny's Child achieves three 
back-to-back No. 1 singles in 2000, 
making the band Billboard's Top 
Pop Artist of 2000. The group is 
nominated for five Grammys, four 
for the single "Say My Name." 



A Faith Hill and Tim McGraw perform A Pink is one of the year's top 



to sellout crowds on their Soul 2 Soul 
tour. Hill and McGraw win the Country 
Music Association's Female and Male 
Vocalist of the Year, making them the 
first couple to win in the same year. 



new artists. Her debut album, 
Can't Take Me Home, sells 2 
million copies, and two of her 
songs are Top 10 hits. 



Ben Vanhouten/AP/Wide World Photos 



□ Rock music dominates the music charts and award shows in 2000. 
Groups including matchbox twenty, Vertical Horizon and 3 Doors Down top 
both the rock and pop singles charts with their respective singles "Bent," 
"Everything You Want," and "Kryptonite." 




D Baha Men's hit song "Who Let the Dogs Out" reaches anthem status 
at sports stadiums across the country. The song also wins a Grammy 
nomination for Best Dance Recording. 



2000-2001 




>» 







fH The New York Yankees defeat the New York 
Mets four games to one in the first "Subway 
Series" since 1956. It is the Yankees' third 
straight World Series win and their 26th overall. 



□ American Marion Jones, 24, becomes the first woman to 
win five track and field medals in a single Olympic Games 
at the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney. Jones wins the 100- 
and 200-meter sprints and the 4x400 relay, and finishes 
third in both the 4x100 relay and long jump. 





D Tiger Woods, 24, wins three of golf's 
four major tournaments to become the 
youngest player to win a career grand 
slam. Woods also breaks the earnings 
record for a single year with winnings 
of more than $9 million. 



SdfM.Onp.V 



-J$* 



' jm:i^MMKi?^lm^r^M 







*4i\ *■ - 




A Bobby Labonte wins the 2000 
NASCAR Winston Cup, his first after 
eight years on the circuit. Labonte 
and his brother Terry, winner of two 
previous Winston Cups, are the first 
brothers to win titles. 



A The Houston Comets beat the 
New York Liberty to win the 2000 
WNBA championship. The win is 
Houston's fourth in a row, and 
star Cynthia Cooper is named the 
finals MVP. 



A in the 2001 Orange Bowl, the 
underdog Oklahoma Sooners defeat 
the Florida State Seminoles 13-2 to 
win the National Championship. It 
is Oklahoma's first title in 15 years. 



A Australian Karrie Webb is named 
the LPGA's Player of the Year for the 
second time in a row. Webb wins 
seven titles in 2000, including the 
U.S. Women's Open in July, and sets 
an earnings record of $1 .8 million. 



□ Venus Williams dominates women's 
tennis. The 20-year-old has a 35-match 
winning streak, which includes the titles 
at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open as well 
as an Olympic gold medal. 



FLASH 



>>> 




With a win against the University 
of Dayton in September, Yale 
becomes the first college team 
to win 800 football games. 

In January 2001 , after a three-year 
hiatus, legendary Mario Lemieux 
returns to play for the Pittsburgh 
Penguins, the hockey team 
he now part-owns. Lemieux 
becomes the first owner/player 
in the history of the NHL. 





H Cyclist Lance Armstrong wins his 
second consecutive Tour de France in 
July. Armstrong, a cancer survivor, also 
writes his autobiography It's Not About 
the Bike: My Journey Back to Life. 




» > 2000-2001 



OLYMPICS CHAMPIONS HEROES 




S3 The Los Angeles Lakers win the NBA 
championship, the franchise's first in 12 years. 
The Lakers beat the Indiana Pacers in game six of 
| the finals. Center Shaquille O'Neal is named MVP. 



FLASH 



>>> 



Q In June, the New Jersey 
Devils win their second Stanley 
Cup in six seasons by defeating 
defending champion Dallas Stars 
four games to two in the finals. 
Scott Stevens wins the Conn 
Smythe Trophy for postseason MVP. 




The racing world is stunned when 
NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Sr., 
a seven-time Winston Cup champion, 
is killed on the last lap of the 
Daytona 500 in February 2001 . 
NASCAR does not retire numbers, 
but car owner Richard Childress 
said he will never again race 
Earnhardt's black No. 3 car. 

Xtreme Football debuts in February 
2001. The game combines 
conventional football rules with 
some of the mayhem of professional 
wrestling. Eight teams play in the 
league's first season. 



Djansezian/AP/Wide World Photos 




A Laura Wilkinson overcomes 
three broken toes to win the 
women's 10-meter platform diving 
competition. Wilkinson is the first 
American woman to earn the gold 
in this Olympic event since 1964. 



A In a huge upset, American 
Greco-Roman wrestler Rulon 
Gardner defeats Russian legend 
Alexander Karelin for the gold in 
the super heavyweight class. The 
loss is Karelin's first in 13 years. 



A American swimmer Misty Hyman 
beats out heavily favored Susie 
O'Neill of Australia to win the 200- 
meter butterfly. Hyman's winning 
time of 2:05.88 is an Olympic record. 



A American runner Michael Johnson 
makes history by winning the 400- 
meter run for an unprecedented 
second time in a row at the Olympics. 
Alvin Harrison, also from the United 
States, wins the silver medal. 




Q The Baltimore Ravens beat the New York Giants 34-7 in Super Bowl 
XXXV for their first NFL title. Ray Lewis of Baltimore's highly touted defense 
is named MVP of the game. 



D Cathy Freeman carries the Olympic torch at the opening ceremonies 
of the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney. Freeman goes on to win the 400- 
meter dash, becoming the first Aboriginal Australian to earn an individual 
Olympic gold medal. 




2000-2001 



I 




>» 



I Q Paula Prince of Port Richey, 
| Florida, wins the sixth annual Ugly 
Couch Contest, sponsored by a 
slipcover manufacturer, with her 
vintage 70s entry. Prince and two 
other contest finalists appear on 
ABC's "Live! With Regis" in October. 





D Comedian Dennis Miller debuts as co-announcer on ABC's 
"Monday Night Football." Miller's offbeat humor gets a mixed 
reaction from fans, and the series earns some of the lowest 
ratings in its 31 -year history. 



www.surefit.com/1-888-surefit 



Q Fred Rogers, host of the children's 
PBS show "Mister Rogers' 
Neighborhood," announces he will tie 
his tennis shoes for the last time, 
when his final new episode airs in 
August 2001 . Rogers will continue to 
work on Web sites, books and special 
museum projects. 




H In honor of the late 
cartoonist Charles 
Schulz, 101 fiberglass 
Snoopy statues — each in 
a theme wardrobe — are 
displayed in Schulz's hometown 
of St. Paul. Several are 
auctioned off in October 
to raise money for 
aspiring cartoonists 




Video gamer Josh Griffith, 17, 
starts a business filling in for 
other gamers involved in an 
online roleplaying game called 
"Asheron's Call." Players are 
required to put in hours of 
game time to keep their online 
characters powerful. Busy 
executives pay Griffith up to 
$40 an hour to play for them. 

After a record 3,545 wins and 
$81 million in earnings during 
her 19-year career, jockey Julie 
Krone becomes the first woman 
inducted into the National Racing 
Hall of Fame. 



Q Controversial Indiana University 
basketball coach Bob Knight is fired in 
September after allegedly violating a 
University-imposed code of conduct. 
During his 29 years at Indiana, Knight 
was often criticized for temper 
outbursts. His dismissal provokes 
student protest demonstrations. 



What do you think? 

Please give us your feedback on World Beat @ www.jostens.com/yearbook 



Printed in USA. © 2001 Jostens, Inc. 00-0201 (1751) 



SEESEfl 



IE 




i campus several times throughout the year. One 
■oup dressed up the statue at the campus entrance 
women's clothing one cold February day. 




Wisdom was 
everywhere 
on campus 
this year. In 
the spring 
people could 
walk through 
the Arbore- 
tum and get a 
peek at the 
mother and 
baby owl that 
made a nest 



MAGIC MAN. 
Freshman John 
Rabenhorst 
takes a bow with 
his assistant af- 
ter performing a 
magic show in 
Hurley audito- 
rium one after- 
noon for the 
campus. 



Dr. Barrie Richardson of the Frost 



School of Business ended his last 



year of his teaching career in style. 



He was selected as the recipient 



of the 2001 Outstanding Teacher 



Award. 



photo courtesy of: Public Relations 




Dr. Lisantti and his 
assistant place a 
student on the bed of 
nails before they break 
a cinder block on her 
stomach at the Physics/ 
Chemistry Circus. 

SHOOT FOR THE 
TOP. Senior Ronnie 
McCollum became the 
nation's No. 1 scorer in 
NCAA Division 1, with 
29.1 points per game. 
photo courtesy of: Public 
Relations 




Current Events \\l 



I 



everybody gets a good show 



H 





By: Mindy Montgomery 



>! Senior Rolin Moe acts in the 
play The Cripple of Inishmaan. Audi- 
ences learn about Cripple Billy, who is 
determined to cross the sea from 
Inishmaan to a neighboring island where 
a Hollywood director holds auditions for a 
documentary. 

ACTING TRIALS. Actors from the 
award-winning play Gross Indecency: 
The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde stage 
their close up. The play tells the story of 
the downfall of Oscar Wilde, a man whose 
artistic genious was overshadowed by the 
scandal surrounding his imprisonment for 
acts of "gross indecency". 




TAKING IT ALL 
IN. Gross Inde- 
cency: The Three 
Trials of Oscar 
Wilde used trial tran- 
scripts, personal 
correspondence, in- 
terviews and other 
source materials to 
tell the story of Os- 
car Wilde. 

A BUZZING 
STORY. Cast 
members of As 
Bees in Honey 
Drown\e\\ the story 
of Alexa Vere De 
Vere, a self-de- 
scribed promoter 
of rock stars who 
sets out to con- 
vince novelist Evan 
Wyler to pursue 
fame and fortune. 

18 1 Student Life 



What did you 

like most about 

the plays? 



I enjoy seeing my 
fellow students 
perform in the the- 
atre." 

-Ceci Salinas, 
Junior 




photo by Mindy Montgomery 



"The great sets. 
People building 
sets work until 2 
a.m. and it really 
pays off." 
-Paul Aucoin, 
Sophomore 



'They put on very 
professional plays 
and prepare the the- 
atre majors for ca- 
reers." 
-Matthew 
Philbrook, 
Junior 



"I enjoy being able 
to see plays that 
are not widely 
known." 

-Michael Lindahl, 
Freshman 




photo byMindy Montgomery 




photo by: Mindy Montgomery 




photo byMndy Montgomery 



BEST PLAY PERFORMED WAS. 



"As Bees in Honey Drown. Come on, it makes fun of Holly- 
wood! What's not to love?!?" 
-Junior Crystal Carter 

"The Cripple of Inishmaan because I really got into the story." 
-Junior Autumn Shaver 




TOP 10 REASONS 

^^^gTHEKAYS 

10. See Abbey Broussard smash eggs. 

9. First Year Experience. 

8. To get the tasty refreshments. 

7. To check out the interesting sets. g$j 

6. To check out your friends' acting skills. 

5. To get a good laugh. 

4. To get a good cry. 

3 To learn the story of Oscar Wilde. 

2 Because your student fees pay for 
' your tickets. 

1 . To have a great time. 



photo by: Neil Johnson 




Anne Gremillion joined the Pride's Crossing cast as Mabel 
Tidings Bigelow. The play tells the story of a woman who 

relives her colorful past in sketches, entwining her past and 

The cast of The Cripple oflnishmaan 

present to reveal the exact moment of opportunity lost and 

is not naturally this beautiful. Like most actors in the 

love rejected that define her life. Mable seizes her moment business, they had to go through makeup and costumes to 

in the sun when she becomes the first woman to swim the achieve this look - " ,fs the u 9 liest cast l>ve ever made U P-" 

says Sarah Perkins. 
English Channel, 




LEAN ON ME. Junior Abbey 
Broussard and Anne Gremillion stage a 
scene in Pride's Crossing. Playwright 
Tina Howe tells the story of Mabel Bigelow 
in an effort to portray the "passion" and 
"power" of old ladies. 





■■ 






\ ' '. ■ 




W - i 








k . 




1 






.1 

i 


\ 
• A 




.__ 


-*!• 




*,- 




5 i&unkjM^kl* 








tf j*J<>4lOtaEfc 


1 i _■ _^ 









What can you tell students about pre- 
paring for a play? 



"Having a smaller role takes just as 
much time to prepare." 
-Senior Kathryn Shelton 




BACKSTAGE PASS. Freshman 
John Rabenhorst works backstage in 
Marjorie Lyons Playhouse to build the set 
for one of the productions. Set builders 
put in many hours working on the cre- 
ations that will be placed on the stage. 



ON YOUR 
MARK. Senior 
Michael Tooke acts 
in a scene of As 
Bees in Honey 
Drown. "It's not as 
easy as it looks," 
Tooke says of pull- 
ing off his scene. 



Ttetre 1 19 




students embrace fitness center opening 

HAPING UP 



CHECKING IT „ 

c 
.o 

OUT During the 5 

cc 

Sneak Peek event ig 

3 
Q_ 

students roamed o 
s-, 
qj 

around the fitness § 

o 

center for a self- S 

o 

•c 

Q. 

guidedtour. These 
students check out 
the natatorium. 
Others got a peek 
at the new ma- 
chines or the 
dance studio, while 
others chose to 
hang out on the 
basketball court for 
the exhibition of the 
basketball teams. 



By: Nikki Doughty 





TAKE A FLYING LEAP. A dancer practices leaps in the new dance studio 
upstairs in the fitness center. 



1 ' 


,. -.1 


f * 


1 


m 


f^L -^t-M { 


1 «d 


.- '^ z M 


SV ^M» r % 


I ; jjp 


■flvwSfty 


m D 


IS Knkfl 


1 


jfffw 




2s 


3 


L w 4 . 


\ 


1 


^ 


JB I it 1 

JH 



COSTUME CRAZY. Students take a photo with Dr. Schwab during the Sneak 
Peek festivities. Since the event was held on Halloween, many people came in 
costume. 



20 Isttident Life 




DIVING INTO IT. Students take a dive into the new pool in the fitness center. The 
natatorium was a welcome addition to the new building that opened in November. 



SLAM IT! Fresh- 
man Michael Gale 
flies high in the air 
to make a slam 
dunk during the 
basketball exhibi- 
tion during the 
Sneak Peekfestivi- 
ties on Halloween 
night. 

SWIMMING 
LIKE A FISH. A 
student swims a 
few laps in the pool 
one afternoon. The 
pool is just one of 
the many ways stu- 
dents can get a 
good workout in the 
new fitness center. 



o 


" SSw' 1 *^ '5H i^iw^^SS^ 


=«— — — 




..,„.„.. 






BHr^ 


?^M 


i . ! 


£ 










n 

5" 


i 


o 




HjCOcKSSsxH 


O 

3 








5a ■frgfgaHH 




>■ miiJI ■wittS*'* 


" 


1 


iw .' - -'^SB?SB| 




niwi"»iTnn ""• sAM *^^ 




s | 


•1 •'•■'.*? 




jHjjQSSSi^si xffiiiJffyS^flfll 






yv~ ^ sny&Vi 




|R|fc^ry '^TBKw^fy^".^. *>^ jf\**J^JQ& 






'(* 




K52«a«r"& ''■jSp^'*^ 




r l — 


■SS^ 


C 
O 

c 






r 




or 








.... 




. *M^nMf^^Hp^ i .Mil 


■13$ * 


M&Afl 


^ 


»• ^ ^TE *'HH 








a 


■ HM ™flPff'vT^ 






i . ' 


O 


: 








£ 


-(wwi* 


41 






o 


in 


■-'Si 






o 


/ 31 31 - 








o 

-c 


,. \-«^?t" ! / MlSL... 









photo courtesy of: Public Relations 
TAKE A PEEK. Students cram excitedly into the fitness 
center for a "Sneak Peek" on Halloween night. 

BREAKING A SWEAT. Members of the soccer teams 
work out on the machines in the fitness center. 



Fitness Center |2l 




RIDE THAT PONY! Junior Matthew 
Philbrook demonstrates the proper way to 
ride the pony at the tailgate party spon- 
sored by Tau Kappa Epsilon and Kappa 
Sigma. Philbrook has had lots of practice 
at perfecting his technique. "I've been 
riding that pony for years," he says. 




WHOOOO'S GOT SCHOOL 
SPIRIT?!? Senior Carolyn Morris and 
Junior Ashley Gaines look on as Junior 
Julie Green proves that she has got plenty 
of school spirit. Green dressed as an owl 
to represent the Chi-Omega mascot on 
their float for the parade. 



GETTING 
FIRED UP. 
Coach Kevin 
Johnson goes over 
some pre-game 
strategy and gets 
the team pumped 
up before the big 
game. 




Back Row: Elizabeth Quillin, Luke Skywalker (aka Rolin Mo< 

Amanda Mustin, Matthew Philbrook, Prince Dawson Tayh 

Duchess Mandy Yearwood. Middle Row: Dana Beyert, Co 
This year's bonfire 

was fun for all. Junior Brian Enricht and Sophomore Bran- Delaney, Princess Ashley Knecht, Duke Chip LeDuff. Frc 

don Thorn show off their school spirit while Freshmen 

Michael Lindahl and Justin Kirkes look on. "Big fires are 

always good," says Thorn. Sieber, Rob Rubel 



Row: Delanie Hebert, King Dave McCormick, Queen Nc 



1 




Did you go to the Homecoming Dance? 



"Yes, I went, and I had a great time." 
-Sophomore Krystil Garrett 



11 1 Student Life 



What Did You 

Like Most About 

H omecoming? 




photo by: Sean Gilder 




photo by: Sean Gilder 




photo by: Aimee Miceli 



"My favorite part was 
yell practice. You 
could act crazy and 
no one cared." 
-Jennifer Hamblin, 
Freshman 

"My favorite part 
was painting my 
body forthe game." 
-Casey Muller, 
Freshman 

"Being on the court 
and riding in the 
parade because it 
was fun!" 
-Delanie Hebert, 
Junior 

"The basketball 
game. It was great 
to see everyone 
with so much 
school spirit." 
-Sean Gilder, 
Junior 




everybody's got the spirit 

OM.1ECOMING 



By: Aimee Miceli 



THE BEST EVENT DURING 
HOMECOMING WAS... 

"My favorite event was the game. It was fun to sit in 

the student section and watch everyone mess with 

the other team." 

-Freshman Ashlie Dagle 

"My favorite event was yell practice." 
-Junior Brien Rabenhorst 




HAPPINESS ABOUNDS. Seniors 
Nola Sieber and Dave McCormick hug 
after being crowned Queen and King. 
"Homecoming should be about embrac- 
ing the unique kind of school spirit that we 
have here at Centenary, and I am proud to 
have been chosen to represent that," says 
Sieber. 

DID YOU CATCH THE PARADE? 
Freshmen Laura Harper and Vicki Kinter, 
Sophomore Lauren Stallings, and Senior 
Ronnie McCollum wave to fans as they 
pass by during the parade. "Riding in the 
parade was lots of fun," says Harper. 



GO GENTS! Stu- 
dents find a creative 
way to show off their 
school spirit at the 
basketball game 
with their T-shirts 
and body paint. 
"Since we couldn't 
go topless we fig- 
ured shirts were the 
next best thing," 
says Freshman 
Julie Watkins. 

DANCING THE 
NIGHT AWAY. 
Sophomore Liz 
Daughenbaugh, 
Senior Ashley 
Knecht, Junior Pe- 
ter Sidaros, and 
Freshman Lindsey 
Garner had a great 
time dancing at the 
after-party. "I never 
pass up an oppor- 
tunity to dance, " 
says 
Daughenbaugh. 



Homecoming [ 23 



STRUMMIN' AWAY. Senior Eric Gardner plays his guitar for his audience & 
during the coffeehouse. Guitar performances are very popular during this event. § 



What Do You Think About The Student Coffeehouse? 



MMMMMI 





photo by: Sean Gilder 

"I think it's great that all the 
talented people at our 
school have a chance to 
show off." 
-Freshman Amy Sullivan 



photo by: Sean Gilder 

"I love watching all of my 

friends perform. There's 

a lot of talent at our 

school." 

-Senior Ashley Knecht 



NOW YOU 
SEE IT, NOW 
YOU DON'T. 

These famous 
words could be 
heard in Freshman 
JohnRabenhorst's 
magic act. Junior 
Jessica Fant says, 
"I was really em- 
barrassed when 
John picked me to 
be his assistant. I 
didn't know why 
everyone was 
laughing at me." 




o 



photo by: Sean Gilder 
LAUGH OUT LOUD. Freshmen Jordan Lansdale and 
Jordan Gedeon clap in rapid delight at one of the student 
performances. Students are often suprised to find out what 
crazy and exciting talents their fellow peers are hiding. 

TALENTED TWOSOME. If one word could describe the 
Student Coffeehouse it would be talent. Junior Adam Blancher 
and Sophomore Doug Bryson perform a duet for the audience. 
"It's the only time I get to play in front of other people," 
Blancher said. "I also like seeing all of the other acts." 












24 1 Student Life 



Lauren Herndon 




students showcase their talents 

Ol'TMillOUS]' 



VIBRANT VOCALS. A variety of 
acts could be found at the Student 
Coffeehouse. Third place went to a 
singer, Junior Amanda Rundell. "I feel 
it's a great way to exhibit all the talent 
on campus," Rundell says of the event. 




MAKING A CONNECTION. For 

some students the coffeehouse is more 
than just a competition. "When I write 
about lost love I want the crowd to 
weep; when I write about my wedding I 
want them all to feel like they were there 
with me. I play to employ empathy among 
open ears," Senior Zach Vaughn said. 

COFFEE AND CHAOS. CAB mem- 
bers work hard to organize each coffee- 
house event, and of course, serve coffee. 
"People are always coming up demand- 
ing free stuff, and we always manage to 
break a coffee pot. It's very hectic," Junior 
CAB member Erin Bryan said. 



It's neat to see some of our fellow 
classmates that have talent, and the others' 



talent is just their plain craziness. 

-Dana Beyert, Junior 



» 



STRIP-TEASE. Although most acts include a talent such 
as singing or acting, some are a little less conventional. Keep- 
ing in tradition, Sophomore Drew Sutton came out to sing and 
strip once again. "Craziness at its best," Sutton said. 



Coffeehouse 1 25 




everybody in bloom 




LING 



By: Aimee Miceli 



In the 
true spirit of Spring Fling CAB President 
Jean Ancelet, a junior, spreads a little 
sunshine in the cafe as he hands out 
Spring Fling cups to students during din- 
ner. "This has been by far the best Spring 
Fling Centenary has had since I've been 
here, " he says. 

OW TIME. Junior Marie Biamonte 
smiles at the prospect of eating the tons of 
delicious crawfish provided by the alumni 
at this year's crawfish boil in the She 
"This is much better than the cafe!" ex 
claims Biamonte. 




THERE SHE 
IS, MISTER 
CENTENARY 
Freshman John 
Rabenhorst repre- 
sented James Hall 
Council in the Mis- 
ter Centenary pag- 
eant which kicked 
off Spring Fling. 
Rabenhorst takes 
his victory stroll af- 
ter being crowned 
the winner. "The 
pageant was a lot of 
fun, but the worst 
was shaving my 
legs," he states. 

SWEET 
TOOTH. Sopho- 
more Krystil 
Garrett takes ad- 
vantage of the free 
candy at movie 
night. This year 
CAB showed the 
movie Road Trip . 
"The movie was 
really funny, and 
the free candy was 
great," says 
Garrett. 



26|SMent Life 



What Did You 

Like Most About 

Spring Fling? 



"Karaoke in the 
Cafe was cool be- 
cause I got to see 
everyone's singing 
skills." 
-Angela 
Vandenberg, 
Sophomore 



"The Miss-ter Cen- 
tenary Pageant 
was fun to watch 
because we got to 
see all the boys get 
in touch with their 
feminine side." 
-Autumn Shaver, 
Junior 

"I thought the 
What's in a Name 
event was really 
interesting be- 
cause I got to find 
out the meaning of 
my name." 
-Kristen Paxson, 
Freshman 



"My favorite event 
was the coffee- 
house with Howie 
Day. I enjoyed 
watching him sing 
and play the gui- 
tar." 

-Grace Dickson, 
Freshman 




photo by: Nikki Doughty 




photo by:Aimee Miceli 




photo by: Aimee Miceli 



• • * 












M 


wf ** 




: 


J '* 








! ^H 1 

1 I 



IF I COULD CHANGE ONE THING 
ABOUT SPRING FLING... 

would have more medium T-shirts for all the little people." 
-Junior Heidi Fahrenholtz 



"Nothing. I think there was a good variety of events, and 

of fun attending. " 
-Junior Nikki Doughty 



had lots 




JL V^JL JLVlT ■ wl 1 ;,f W m\. X M f\ I | Jfl 

OF SPRING FLING 

1 0. Getting a free T-shirt in your size. 

Q Hearing Kelly Stover gasp in disbelief 
J- during Road Trip. 

Listening to everyone try to sing 
°- during Karaoke in the Cafe. 

7 Getting a free cup in any color you 
' wanted. 

g Finding out the deep meaning behind 
' your name. 

5 Chilling out with Howie Day during the 
" coffeehouse. 

4. Painting posters for hours on end. 

3 Two words: FREE CRAWFISH! 

Bambi LaCreem performing her song 
2. -Caddo Magnet College." 

1 Watching John and Vicki have the 
' ■ time of tneir lives at the Mister Cente- 
nary pageant. 



photo by: Sean Gilder 



The deck party was a highlight of the Spring Fling events. 



The Human Relations class worked hard all year to revamp 



the deck off the back of the cafeteria. The opening was 



complete with balloons, food, and lots of fun. Freshman 



Erin Watson chows down on some of the food that was 



served at the party. 




Senior 
Ashley Knecht and a visiting friend take a break from eating 
their crawfish.The crawfish boil is an annual event held 
during Alumni Weekend, and this year it was linked to the 
end of the Spring Fling festivities. "I look forward to the 
crawfish boil every year!" exclaims Knecht. 




TAKE A BOW. Sophomore Andrew 
Irby represented Zeta Tau Alpha in the 
Miss-ter Centenary pageant. He demon- 
strates a few things men should know 
about women during his inspirational tal- 
ent. 




What did you think about the Miss-ter 
Centenary contest? 



"It was funny to see John Grand in a 
dress talking about the TKE boys." 
-Freshman Ryan Walsh 




MUSIC TO MY EARS. Juniors Jen- 
nifer Watson and Shannon Guzovich belt 
out a tune during Karaoke in the Cafe. The 
event took place during dinner so all the 
students could enjoy a little music with 
their meal. 



MAKE ME 
LAUGH. Stu- 
dents look on and 
laugh at this year's 
Miss-ter Centenary 
contestants com- 
pete and entertain 
to win the crown for 
reigning queen 
Bambi LaCreem. 



Spring Fling \ n 




sexton no'talent show draws crowd 



VISING STARS 



By: Nikki Doughty 




R. The audience listens with great interest and excitement to 
the performer on the stage. 



28 Istudent Life 



JAMMING. Sophomore Doug Bryson sings with the boys in the band for the no- 
talent show. The boys impressed the crowd with their musical talents. 




EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED. Students never know what to expect from their 
peers once they take the stage, especially in this case when this act included singing, 



SAX SAVVY. 

Freshman Collin 
Taylor belts out 
some melodies on 
his saxophone 
while he played in a 
band with other stu- 
dents during the 



RIGHT ON 
KEY, Another 
student plays the 
keyboards, during 
the talent show. 
Many musical in- 
struments were 
played in the show, 
ranging from saxo- 
phones to guitars to 
keyboards. 



DANCING QUEENS. Freshman Ashlie Daigle boogies on 
stage with her partner in crime during the show. 

TALENTED TRIO. Dancing was a popular act in the no- 
talent show. These three girls show the crowd their moves. 



Talent siow |29 



E KILL. Senior MAKING THE PASS. Sophomore 
Rebecca Geihsler charges downfield in a Rau| Aucoin read for a pass whj|e 
game for the Choir s Girls Intramural Foot- 
ball team playing intramural football for the TKEs. 




PEP TALK. The intramural Softball teams gather together for a pre-game pep talk 
on the Jones-Rice field. 



30 1 Student Life 






"a 

3- 
O 



Ci 



j» 



competition gets fierce on the Jones-Rice field 

NTRAMURALS 



By: Nikki Doughty 



THE CHAMPI- 
ONS. The Chi 
Omega champion 
flag football team 
proudly gathers to- 
gether for a victory 
photo after wining 




CALMING THEiR NERVES. The flag football teams goof off while they let out some energy before the big game at the State 
Championship. 

Intramurals | 3i 



THE MONUMENTAL 
WALK Senior Lee 
Parker and his class- 
mates walk in front 
ofMickle Hall on their 
way to the 
President's Convo- 
cation. Parker says, 
"I never thought the 
day would come 
when I would be 
walking in one of 
those black robes to 
the President's Con- 
vocation. As I 
started my senior 
year with that mo- 
ment, I was excited, 
anxious, and sad all 
at the same time." 










32 1 Academics 






knows the 




answers 



By: Nikki Doughty 
Students worked hard this year to get everything they 
could out of their top-notch education. Small classes 
allowed professors the opportunity to get to know and 
work one-on-one with their pupils. Students were chal- 
lenged to explore subject matter more thoroughly through 
class presentations. They got to help and explore not 
only the city through Service Learning projects but also 
the world through May Modules. Students who could 
not make it out of the country got to form special bonds 
and learn a little bit about other parts of the world from 
exchange students. Some over-achievers decided to 
work on getting their foot in the door by taking on 
internships. The campus community recognized those 
students who went above and beyond in their academic 
careers at the annual Honors Convocation. During 
mid-terms and finals students could be found with 
their heads buried in massive piles of books as they tried 
to cram in that last chapter. All the hard work paid off for 
seniors when graduation finally rolled around, and they 
said good-bye to those faces they had known every day 
for the last four (or five) years. The journey to knowing 
all the answers was not quick or easy, but it offered 
some interesting and exciting sights along the way. 

\7 




Divider 1 33 



SHOWIN' IT 
Sophomores 
Caleb Ashley and 
Johanna Weaver 
show off their stuff 
during theirpresen- 
tation on weight 
management pro- 
grams in Dynam- 
ics of Physical Fit- 
ness class. Ashley 
says, "Presenta- 
tions reinforce what 
is learned in class, 
and they provide 
students a chance 
to share their 
knowledge with 
others." 




GETTlNCi 1Mb UUUUS Uhh 1 Mt IN 
Senior Lewis Bell spends hours in the library digging up informa- 
tion on the Internet to collect supporting material for his presen- 
tations. He says, "I love class presentations because they give 
me a chance to show off my knowledge to class. Some people 
have a phobia of public speaking, but class presentations can 
really help overcome such a problem. ..plus they are just fun." 

OF INFO. Project after project keeps 
Junior Margo Shidiler locked up in the law library researching on 
the Internet and in published works. Shidiler says, "Because I 
am a Political Science major, I spend most of my time doing 
research for my presentations in the library basement's legal 
library. Most people don't even know it's down there!" 




Enhance 



" ■» ■» -*- 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 

LAST MINUTE DETAILS. On the front 
porch of James Dorm Sophomore Christy Finch 
and Senior Maria Saucier put their heads together 
one last time to put all the details in place for their 
presentation. "I definitely prefer group presenta- 
tions over individual presentations. Standing in 
front of a classroom by yourself is a form of mental 
torture for shy people," says Finch. 



"I support using visual aids during presentations. They 
provide visual stimulation to the oral presentation and facili- 
tate a more interesting environment in which to learn." 
Sophomore Cody McDonald 



"I think that visual aids add to the presentation. They also 
help the audience understand and follow along with the 
presentation." 

Sophomore Greg Coates 

"Visual aids keep the audience's attention, give excitement 
to the presentation, and provide a visual picture to help the 
audience understand the information." 

Juniors Margaret Read and Amanda Taylor 



AHH...SIGH OF RELIEF. 
Sophomore Chris Robinson walks 
back to civilization in relief aftergiving 
his presentation in religion class. Com- 
pleting a presentation offers many stu- 
dents a feeling of relief and relaxation. 

QUESTIONS ANYONE? After! 
giving her visual aid speech in public i 
speaking Sophomore Janelle Thibault! 
awaits questions from her class- 
mates. "I like people asking me ques-j 
tions after my speech because it 
shows they have been listening to 
what I have been saying. It also shows 
that maybe they care about what I am 
saying," says Thibault. 



34 Academics 




I mm (mm m 111 



yfujki:: 



perfect 



students face class presentations 

By: Amy Waguespack 




like presentations better 



O "I 

o 

* than tests, but they can still 

I be stressful." 

I -Lana Cheatwood, Junior 



"Presentations are a lot bet- 
ter than tests because you 
don't have to study for them." 
-Freshman Allison Kana 





"Presentations are a great 
way to show what you know 
in a creative way." 
-Sophomore Ashlei Baker 



"Presentations are better 
I than tests because you don't 

have to study for them, and 
| you can predict what will 
5 happen." 

-Sophomore Paul Aucoin 



TALKIN' IT UP. Junior Brooke LeCount 
explains point by point her graph on physical 
activity during her presentation. Visual aids, 
including graphs and diagrams, are a popular 
method for explaining key points in presenta- 
tions. 





"Academic presentations 
§■ are always challenging, but 
| our professors help to pre- 
| pare their students for the 
I types of academic presen- 



tations that they will face in 
graduate school or in the 
corporate arena. 
-Junior Elizabeth Quillin 

Presentations |35 



--.' 



decked 



human relations class throws deck party 



A CLASS ACT. 

Members of the 
Human Relations 
class take a picture 
with Dr. Barrie 
Richardson, the 
professor of the 
class. Each year 
the Human Rela- 
tions class selects 
a semester-long 
projectto work on. 
This year the class 
chose to renovate 
the deck on the 
back of the cafete- 
ria, and they threw 
a party to cel- 
ebrate. Past 
projects have in- 
cluded adding 
lights to the Jones- 
Rice field and reno- 
vating the Shell. 

TIME FOR 
RETIRE- 
MENT! Dr. 
Richardson 

proudly shows 
off the clock 
given to him by 
his Human Re- 
lations class as 
a retirement gift. 

36 lAcademics 




WHERE'S THE FOOD? Freshman Aimee Lange 
hangs out and visits with other party-goers as they wait for 
the food to be served. 




GOODBYE TO A FRIEND. Senior Rebekah Snider give Dr. Richardson a hug of appreciation for all 
the fun and hard work he shared with the class. To honor Dr. Richardson's retirement, the class gave him 
a gift. 

= — — _____ _, ^ SW j NG | N - 

GOOD TIME! 
Dr. Barrie 

Richardson walks 
around the new 
deck and talks to 
students about 
their opinions. The 
swing next to Dr. 
Richardson is just 
one of the many 
small projects the 
class took on in or- 
der to make the 
deck more wel- 
coming to stu- 
dents. 

A ROUND OF 
APPLAUSE. 
Senior Rebakah 
Snider stands at 
the microphone 
and gives a speech 



and the class, as 
well as a farewell 
and thank-you 
message to Dr. 
Richardson. 



WAITING AROUND. Senior Lara Brown and other mem- 
bers of the class hang out on the deck as they wait for the 
ceremony to begin. 

g CHOW TIME! Freshman Erin Watson takes big bite out of 
§ the food that was served at the party. Hamburgers and hot dogs 
were some of the choices students got to choose from. 



Human Relations 1 3? 



comine 

^Sam& ^^Bgg&^ ask mm Wk mm Mm mm vS^^Bfct 



;o 



amenca 

foreign exchange students visit campus 



By: Jennifer Hawkins 




| "I became an exchange stu- 

§ dent to put off graduating for 

| another year." 

a: 

1 -Aine Byrne, Ireland 



"I have always had an inter- 
est in American culture, es- 
pecially the South, and it is a 
privilege to experience it for 
real." 
-Stig Nielsen, Denmark 





"My experience in the United 

States has been good. It is 

very nice here." 

-Ann-Katrine Jacobsen, 

Denmark 



"It upsets me that the drink- 
ing age is 21, because I am 
only 20." 

-Anne-Sophie Hardeman, 
France 





"The people are very friendly 
and helpful here." 
-Andres Rodriquez, 
Mexico 



38 lAcademics 




MEET ME UNDER THE TREE. Stig 
Nielsen, Anne-Sophie Hardeman, Ann-Katrine 
Jacobsen, and Andres Rodriguez wait under 
the tree for the rest of their dinner group to 
arrive. Nielson says his experience in the 
south "has been a great one." 




WALK LIKE 
AN EGYP- 
TIAN. Anne- 
Sophie Hardeman 
shows her friends 
her new dance 
step. Laughing at 
herdemonstration, 
Ann-Sophie said, 
"Don't ask me why 
I do crazy things; 
maybe it is be- 
cause I am crazy." 



photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 





YUM. Andres Rodriguez and Ann-Katrine Jacobsen sit and 
eat while discussing the food from back home. Rodriguez says, 
"The food is one of the issues I found here in the U.S. because 
it is so different than the food in Mexico, but it is still good." 

RESTING. Aine Byrne and Junior Delanie Hebert take a 
break before starting their studying for the night. Byrne says she 
"just had to have a cigarette with her roommate so they could 
catch up on their day." 



HANGING AROUND. Junior 
<eith Lawson talks to a few of the 
jxchange students on their way to the 
cafeteria. Ann-Katrine Jacobsen says, 
'In America I have made many new 
riends...even Keith!" 

PLEASE LET THERE BE A 
LETTER.... Paul Masterson checks 
his mailbox hoping to find a letter. 
Snail mail is the high point of many 
students' days. Masterson says he 
was hoping for a letter for "Bigies from 
home." 




, -••.** 



" ■»» *%* 



"Chocolate Chip Cookies. The U.S. has the best cookies 
ever." 

Nelly Pattin, France 



"Freedom from my parents; it is clean, and the weather is not 
too hot." 

Andres Rodriguez, Mexico 



"The people are very friendly and helpful, and I like being in 
a country with so many opportunities." 

Ann-Katrine Jacobsen, Denmark 




photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 

TAKING A BREAK. Paul Masterson takes a 
break from the daily grind of classes as he sits in the 
SUB to participate in the ritual of watching The Price 
is Right . Paul relays what is on his mind: "Wow! 
Sober for once!" 

Foreign Exchange Students! 39 




TESTING THE LIGHT. Neil Johnson works with Senior Eric Gardnerand Junior Nikki Doughty on one 
of his photography projects. Johnson worked throughout the semester on a book about photography 
techniques, and he used his photography students for help in the creative process. 

SHARING A 
LAUGH. Senior 
Katie Furr strikes 
up a conversation 
with Dr. Jodi 
Campbell after 
class one day. 
Many teachers and 
students are able 
to converse on a 
personal level on a 
regular basis. 

HAWAIIAN 
IEMORIES. 
Students on the 
Hawaii module, 
The Pele Experi- 
ence, had many 
opportunities to 
bond with the pro- 
fessors that ac- 
companied them. 
Modules provide 
an oppotunity for 
students and pro- 
fessors to get to 
know each otheron 
an individual basis 
while learning new 
information about 
other cultures. 



GETTING INTO CHARACTER. Dr. Maureen McKenna 
worked closely with students as they prepared to put on their 
Spanish play. 

FOND FAREWELLS. Students bonded so closely with Dr. <?> 

-o 
Barrie Richardson during their Human Relations class that they o 

threw him a retirement party and even got him a gift. 



40 [Academics 



makj£ 



connection 

faculty/student relationships enhance learning 



By: Nikki Doughty 




a 



CONGRATULATIONS ARE IN ORDER. Dr. « 

Schwab congratulates Junior William Wells on his 1 st place $ 
victory in the Halloween costume contest at the Sneak Peek 

of the fitness center. Dr. Schwab goes above and beyond in o 

getting to know the students of the college. a 



THE RING- 
LEADER. Phys- 
ics professor Dr. 
Jerry Lisantti kicks 
off the Physics/ 
Chemistry circus 
on April 14. The 
professors worked 
closely with stu- 
dents to put on an 
amazing show with 
mind-blowing 
tricks like laying 
students down on 
a bed of nails and 
walking across a 
bed of broken 
glass. 

S P L I S H 
SPLASH. Se- 
nior Colin Delaney 
helps out Scott 
Greenwood, Dean 
of Student Life, and 
Lori Bradshaw, As- 
sistant Dean of 
Student Life, at the 
Homecoming tail- 
gate party. Green- 
wood and 
Bradshaw work 
closely with stu- 
dents in their ef- 
forts to improve 
student life on cam- 
pus. 



Faculty/Student Relationships 41 



POLITICAL 

PERFEC- 
)N. Junior 
John Grand is pre- 
sented with the 
Weems, Schimpf, 
Hayter, Gilsoul, 
Carmouche award 
by Political Sci- 
ence Deartment 
Chair Rodney 
Grunes. 




CHEMICALLY BALANCED. Chemistry professor Dr. 
Tom Ticich presents the Outstanding Achievement in Organic 
Chemistry Award to Sophomore Sun-Hee Lee. 

INSPIRATIONAL EXPERIENCE, Senior Lisa Bishop 
receives an award in Elementary Education from Dr. Hernandez. 
"I am honored to receive this award," says Bishop. "Thank you 
to each of my education professors for your dedication to 
improving the lives of children. You have inspired in me a love 
for learning, and I hope to pass that on to each and every student 
that walks into my classroom." 




What Do You Think About Honors Convocation? 



- » -w 



photo by: Aimee Miceli 
ALL SMILES Dean Greenwood is all smiles as 
he presents Senior Nola Sieber with the Centenary 
College Student Service Award. "Although the Stu- 
dent Services Award was truly an honor, it does not 
begin to compare to the honor that comes with 
serving the people who provide the smiles, hugs, 
support and love on which my life and happiness 
depends," says Sieber. 



"It's a thrill to be honored among an already elite group of 
students." 

Senior John Cowden 



"I was happy to see the senior Chi Omegas get their 
awards." 

Sophomore Liz Daughenbaugh 

"If I could have gone, I would have loved it." 
Junior Keith Lawson 



NATIONAL RECOGNITION. 
Dr. Schwab presents Senior Ronnie 
McCollom with a special award for 
being the leading scorer in basketball 
in the country. 

IT'S A BEAUTIFUL DAY. Dr. 
JackO'Dell presents Junior Erin Bryan 
with her award during this year's 
ceremony. "Receiving the award was 
an honor and a shock. Thanks, Jack. 
It was a good day," says Bryan. 



42 Academics 




--^— --— — ^-^— ^— — — 

best 

honors convocation awards students 

By: Aimee Miceli 




"I was surprised to be hon- 

3- 

| ored for doing something I 

o- 

* would have done anyway." 
I -Sophomore 

3- 

Claire Galloway 



"It's nice to be rewarded for 
four years of hard work. It's 
easy to see people around 
campus and forget that 
they're studying something. 
Honors Convocation is a 
great way to show the cam- 
pus what studnts are excel- 
ling in what disciplines." 
-Senior Rolin Moe 





"I thought it was very well 
done, and it was great to see 
my friends honored for all 
their accomplishments." 
-Senior David McCormick 



SINGING SENSATION. Dr.WillAndress 
presents Senior Choir member Dawson Taylor 
with the Director's Award for his dedication to 
the choir over the last four years. "Honors 
Convocation was one of the many highlights of 
my time at Centenary. I was so humbled by the 
awards I received. It was a nice close to four 
great years," says Taylor. 




>"§- D A N C E 
o 
o 



o- D A N C E , 
I DANCE! Se- 
§ niors Keeley 
Lamed and An- 
gela Cage are 
honored with the 
Candace C Ear- 
nest Inspirational 
Dance Award by 
Ms. Ginger 

Folmer. 



Honors Convocation |43 






^^k 1 I 111 I ^k»J 




how you can get involved 

By: Mary Meriam 



LIBRARY 
LADY. There 
are many op- 
tions for earning 
credit by volun- 
teering in local 
schools, and tu- 
toring and read- 
ing to children is 
not the only 
method students 
chose to com- 
plete the job. 
April Scott do- 
nates hertime to 
Cresswell El- 
ementary where 
she helps out by 
shelving library 
books. 




iowGioyou nice your 



rffl 



rffl 



I enjoyed my Service 
Learning experience. I 
worked technical crew 
for the Louisiana Col- 
lege Theatre Festival, 
which Centenary 
hosted. ...Though hec- 
tic, the work was fun 
and the people were 
great to work with. 



-Junior 
Randi Smith 



© 



I did my Service 
Learning through the 
Church Careers pro- 
gram. I sang in a 
church choir and 
helped to organize 
the church's music 
library. I had lots of 
fun. 



-Senior 
Lisa Cowden 



$ 




experience? 

[It was a] fun and 
good experience. I 
got to see what 
teachers really have 
to put up with [work- 
ing as a teacher's 
aid]. 



-Senior 
Amanda Earles 



© 



FESTIVAL FUN. Senior Scott Isaacs plays with aj 
puppet while earning his Service Learning credit at the Red] 
River Revel. "I enjoyed working at the Revel. I got to meet: 
people who had booths. I found it to be a great learning 
experience. I got to see how the Revel runs and how they put 
it together," says Isaacs. 



44 Ucademics 



«* 



LET THE CREATIVE JUICES FLOW! A major project in Shreveport was the mural painting on the 
side of the AT&T building downtown. Several students donated their spare time to help paint the mural. It 
was done similar to a paint-by-number system so anyone could help. Senior loanna Panos uses her artistic 
ability as she works diligently on a section of the piece for her Service Learning project. 




photo by:Ashley Knecht 

"Service Learning was a great 
experience for me! I got prac- 
tical experience in my subject 
area (education) through 
the CLEAR, tutoring 
program. ...[However] we 
should help the less fortunate 
students for free, not for a 
fee...." 

-Senior 
Carter D. Benton 



"I did my Service Learning 
during the Special Olympics 
module. I had a blast.. ..While 
it was a lot of hard work 
[setting up], the look on the 
kids faces when they saw it 
all was well worth the time it 
took to bring it together." 
-Junior 
Michelle Long 





photo by: Ashley Knecht 



photo by.Ashley Knecht 

"I went to the Special Olym- 
pics for Service Learning, 
and it was one of the most 
rewarding experiences of 
my life. Being able to work 
with the kids to make them 
better athletes put a smile 
on my face and theirs...." 
-Junior 
Chip LeDuff 




STORYBOOK 
HOUR. Volun- 
teering at local 
schools is a popu- 
lar way to earn ser- 
vice credit, espe- 
cially for students 
who like to work 
with kids. Third- 
graders at Univer- 
sity School pay 
close attention to 
Junior Stephanie 
Lott as she reads 
Charlotte's Web by 
E.B.White. "Work- 
ing with kids was a 
learning experi- 
ence for me as well 
as for them," says 
Lott. 




hoto by: Nikki Doughty 
MAKING IT CRYSTAL 
y.L.E.A.R. Jennifer Watson tutors 
. student in the library for C.L.E.A.R. 
I enjoy knowing that I am helping 
omebody succeed in school," says 
Vatson. 



CD 

O 

o 
1— 

c 
a 

i5 








~Wm\ 1 




OJ 

O 








? *** «'/HI 


O 

O 
-C 

a. 




JP ; *> jrf 








I Bk^^ 


""""* w 




) V 














« 


'■:-^M s 










" ^^^ 


f j 






1 


j^ 




1 9 




[sjjB8iSi5»81b*'«ji' ■ 






I 



Cw 














-Y 














o 
n 












f : I 


h- 












f ' > '• I 


c 












ji 1 1 . : I 


i5 










4 


1 


•ij 










:;J^^B> 


v 


o 




§ M 










^ 


^*^-« 








* z^L 


til 


•J 


* m^J^^ 


1 






, : ' ; 


3 

n 








i< 


V ' \ 




U 










\- ' Lr 




O 










fl 


















o 




















i 


r 







REVELING IT UP. Senior Jenny Webb gives directions at 
the Red River Revel. The Revel attracts many students 
because it is a quick and easy way to complete their hours. 
They work in various stations throughout the festival, including 
admissions, coupons, and drink booths. 

CHRISTMAS ALL YEAR. Sophomores Tasha Rogers 
and Melanie Moeck help decorate for the annual Shreveport 
event known as Christmas in the Sky. The benefit raises money 
at Christmas to help charities, and it includes a silent auction for 
different gifts. Students volunteer year-round to help decorate 
and set things up. 



Service Learning 45 







photocourtesy of: John Turner 
A HELPING HAND. Students in the 
Education module assisted teachers at 
Hollywood Middle School. They helped 
with tests, assignments, and other daily 
classroom duties. 



READING UP. Junior Todd Killen assists 
students with their reading assignment during 
his Education module. 



46 1 Academics 



ON THE 

ROAD AGAIN. 
Members on the 
Spain module hike 
together down the 
road as they make 
their way to the 
next stop. They 
traveled great dis- 
tances, averaging 
many miles a day, 
but never gave up 
until they reached 
their final destina- 
tion. 




HITTING THE MARK Participants on the Spain module 
proudly take a photo at the Santiago sign on their trip. After many 
hours of hiking they finally reached this major point in their 
journey. 



FORMING NEW FRIENDSHIPS. Junior Meagan Gillett 
bonds with students as she lends them a hand them during the 
Education module. 



HATCHING SOME AIR. Sopho- 
nore Paul Aucoin takes a jump off a 
:liff while on the Hawaii module. The 
students below watch as they swim 
iff the Fair Winds II in Keala-Kekua 
Bay. 



ON THE ROAD TO 
SANTIAGO. Students on the 
Road to Santiago module take a mo- 
ment out from enjoying their hiking 
adventure to gather for a group photo- 
graph. 




noto^cburtesyof^or^Bukott and Scott Vetter 



■ 


: 'TTtM 






K 

"-'*' 


. .. ■.. . . , .,. 

h : 

■ffpffl 



photo courtesy of: John Turner 



LUAU LADIES. Ladies on the Hawaii module work their hips as they LEADER IN ACTION. Junior Becky Soskin 
learn the hula during a luau. The hula is not as easy as it looks, but these helps a student with his reading skills while she 
ladies did a good job and got some tips for their hula skills. participates in the Education module. 

Modules Ul 



E. Senior Blair Bryson and Junior Jay Hood study in the library a few hours before 
an exam. "A few hours before the exam I usually just relax because if I don't know it by then, I'm not going 
to know it," Bryson says. 




photo by.Ashley Knecht 

"My best advice is not 
to cram. Start studying 
before the night of your 
test." 

-Senior 
Greg Peco 



"Finals aren't so bad if 
you just keep your goal 
insight. It's easy to lose a 
sense of direction when 
you're swamped with so 
much work, but if you just 
keep looking ahead, you'll 
be alright." 

-Senior 
Bob Calhoun 





photo by: Ashley Knecht 

"It is hard to get in the 
mindset to study when 
you are already in 
graduate school." 
-Senior 
Jamie Hearne 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 



TYING TO- 
G E T H E R 
LOOSE ENDS. 

Many students find 
their semester- 
long project piling 
up until the very last 
minute. Sopho- 
more Krystil 
Garrett uses Dead 
Week to complete 
any remaining 
tasks before finals. 
"I thought Dead 
Week was sup- 
posed to be for 
studying, notfinish- 
ing projects and 
last-minute tests," 
she says. 









TO FLUNK OR NOT TO FLUNK. Juniors Niki Roberts 
and Jennifer West study with Freshman Susan King in the 
library. "My roommate and I like to live by Jack Handy's quote, 
Instead of studying for finals, what about just going to the 
Bahamas and catching some rays? Maybe you'll flunk but you 
might have flunked anyway, '"says King. 

IT ALL ADDS UP. Even those last minutes of cramming can 
help make the difference between a higher or lower percentage 
on the test. Senior Matthew Smitherman, Junior Scott Vanderlick, 
and Senior Peter Talavera do some last-minute studying before 
their statistics final. 




>< 



48 lAcademlcs 





photo by: Ashley Knecht ' ', 
COMPUTER WIZARD. Seniorj 
Sarah Bracken practices for one of hei| 
finals. "I just need to pass this one last 
final, Computer Proficiency, to gradu- 
ate," she says. 




students' - 
nightmare 

finals challenge and stress students 



By: Ashley Knecht 




DON'T 
SWEAT IT. 
While some stu- 
dents sweat and 
worry over the fi- 
nals that loom in 
the future, others 
embrace the chal- 
lenge. Freshman 
Mitchell Glass sits 
on the library steps 
as he studies for 
one of his finals. "I 
look forward to the 
challenge of taking 
finals," Glass says. 



jOING BANANAS. The pressures of finals causes 
some students to get a little silly. Senior Larry Loocke, for 
Jxample, goofs around on the library scanner to relieve the 
stress of working on his Senior Seminar Project. 



iai do vou. think o\ finals? 



What finals mean to 

me: 

(F)requent trips to 

Murrell's and IHOP. 

(I)ncarcerationatthe 

library. 

(N)o sleep." 

Ajhhhhhh! 

jL)augh, otherwise 

you'll cry. 

(S)oon it'll all be over. 




-Junior 
Jacqueline Carr 



© 



The week before fi- 
nals is not called 
'Dead Week' be- 
cause things are 
quiet. It is called such 
because your pro- 
fessors are trying to 
kill you, and you want 
to die. 



-Freshman 
Ashlie Daigle 



© 



m 



I really don't like fi- 
nals because they 
put so much pres- 
sure on you. I hate 
that your grade usu- 
ally comes right 
down to your final. 

© 

-Freshman 
Traci Smith 



Finals 49 




r, 



r 



L ,)I 



' I £ 11 S 








K_St *3BHm?i 


PMfJJ^ffMmf ' , Hell 






CE] i 


'.M 


' lAK 




'J L 




Ik. \k 




OF AX 
GTABLU 




"IK, 


> A 



CENTENARY LADY 
NOLA SIEBER 

Involvements : SGA VPIA, Homecoming Court, 
Alpha Chi, BSU, AED 




CENTENARY GENT 
DAWSON TAYLOR 

Involvements : SGA President, Choir, UMSM, 

Orientation Staff, Tau Kappa Epsilon, College 

Democrats 

"I think what makes me a Pacesetter is my 

involvement in so many different things at 

Centenary. From political interest groups to 

religious life groups, it is fun to be a part of so 

many different things." 




FACULTY PACESETTER 
SUSAN BRAYFORD 



FACULTY PACESETTER 
BRYAN ALEXANDER 



SO I Academics 





JEAN ANCELET 

Involvements ; CAB President, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, ODK, Maroon Jackets, KSCL 
Substitute DJ, Orientation Leader 
"Everyone's life should be equal parts serious- 
ness and laughter, though the seriousness 
should be a much more subtle flavoring. Tests 
and exams will happen, but don't forget to 
laugh with a friend afterward." 




DANA BEYERT 

Involvements : SGA Junior Senator, Zeta Tau 

Alpha Recruitment Chair/Sisterhood Chair, 

Cheerleading captain, Panhellenic, Yell 

practice, Intramurals, Food Services Committee 

"Because short + sexy = Pacesetter!" 

(John Grand) 





COLIN DELANEY 

Involvements : Tau Kappa Epsilon President. 
Orientation Leader, Homecoming Court 



Pacesetter 1 51 




f rr\ rr\ 





JOHN GRAND 



Involvements : ODK, Alpha Chi, Pi Sigma 

Alpha, Tau Kappa Epsilon Hegemon, RA, 

Canterbury House, Health Service Committee, 

Co-founder of Tolf Club and Roteract Club. 

"I am a Pacesetter because the majority of the 

student body witnessed a great injustice when I 

lost the Miss-ter Centenary pageant, and 

consequently I received a pity vote for 

Pacesetter." 




TOMECA JOHNSON 

Involvements : Hardin Hall Counci 
Conglomerate staff, KSCL, RHA, President- 
Student Swap Day Honoree, Prospective host, 

BSA, Sigma Tau Delta, Writing Lab tutor. 

"I think [what makes me a Pacesetter) is that I 

let myself get easily inspired." 





ASHLEY KNOT 



Involvements : Chi Omega President/Vice Presi- 
dent, AED, ODK Vice-President, Yoncopin staff, 
Chemistry Club, CAB, Orientation Leader, Greek 
Renewal Committee, Panhellenic, Frisbee Club, 
Canterbury House, Manager of Fitness Center 
"Even though at times it can be a bad thing. ..I 
love the size. I love how you know everyone 
and see them on a daily basis and get to 'hang 
out' with your professors outside of school. The 
faculty and student body really make the school 
the great college it is." 



52 1 Academics 




f t c\ r r\ 



C 





BRANDON LAWSON 

nvolvements : SGA, Pre-Law President, 

College Democrats President, Sophomore 

Senator, Orientation Leader 

[What makes me a Pacesetter is that] I put my 

best foot forward." 




CHIP LEDUFF 

Involvements : Eagle Scout, ODK Freshman Leader- 
ship Award, Shannon M. Brown Choir Freshman 
Service Award, Homecoming Duke, Male Vice-Presi- 
dent of Choir, Pylortes of Tau Kappa Epsilon, Na- 
tional Residence Hall Honorary Founding Member, 
Senior RA of Rotary, Rotary Hall Council Advisor. 
"Come and relax now 
Put your troubles down 
No need to bear the weight of your worries here 
Let them all fall away..." 
-Dave Matthews Band 





DAVID MCCORMICK 

Involvements : Tau Kappa Epsilon, Orientation 
Staff, Homecoming King, Yell Leader 



Pacesetters 1 53 





CHRISTY MELTON 



Involvements : Zeta Tau Alpha Standards Chair, 

RHA National Communications Coordinator in 

Training, Sexton Hall Council President, Co-ed 

Housing Implementation Committee, Sigma 

Tau Delta 

"I hope that people will remember that I was 

someone who was easy to approach, and they 

could count on me for support in the things they 

were trying to accomplish." 



ROLffi MOE 



Involvements : SGA ( VPIA), Orientation (Officer 
in 1999-2000), KSCL (News Director 2 years), 
Conglomerate (Copy Editor 2 years), Pandora, 
Wind Ensemble, Orchestra, CLEAR, Hall Coun- 
cil (Secretary/Treasurer), Students for Cultural 
Diversity, Feminist Organization, Film Society, 
TA for Dr. Hendricks' FYE, sat on many commit- 
tees, and director of the film project Clubbing. 
"Other than my inability to stick with a hair 
color, hopefully [people will remember] that I 
was a fun guy with something interesting to 
say." 





MTTBE? PBILBR00K 

Involvements : SGA Junior Senator, Admissions , 

Ambassador, Homecoming Court, KSCL DL 

Student Union Manager, Orientation Officer, 

Captain and Co-founder of Centenary Frisbee 

Club, Centenary Environmental Citizens, Rotary 

Hall Council First Floor Rep, Canterbury House 

Episcopal Ministry 

"If I could control what people would remember 

about me, I would want it to be that I enjoyed life 

to the fullest and was a genuinely nice guy. 

However, I think people will most probably 

remember me for both my big hair and 'riding that 

pony!" 



54lAcademics 







ELIZABETH OUILLIN 

Involvements : Student Ambassador, Oriei 

tion Staff, RHA, James Hall Council President, 

Zeta Tau Alpha President, AED, ODK, Alpha 

Chi, Conduct Review Committee, Dean's List 

for 5 semesters, Homecoming Court, conducted 

medical research. 

"I can't tell you how much it means to me to 

not be a number, but instead to have a name, 

goals, and to be recognized by anyone, faculty 

or students." 




BRIEN RABENKORST 

Involvements : Men's basketball team, Tau 

Kappa Epsilon Social Chair, Alpha Chi 

President, ODK, AED 

'Don't take life too seriously; no one ever gets 

out alive anyway." 





JOM RABEOORST 

Involvements : SGA Senator, Miss-ter Cente- 
nary Winner, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Magic Show 
performer, Stepping Stones, UMSM, Crew, 

Orientation Leader 

"I think people will remember that I loved 

making others happy. Whether it is me being 

stupid, Dirty Dancing, or performing some 

magic in a small group, I just love brightening 

someone else's day." 



Pacesetters 1 55 





E T I 





rli 



'">"» 







ROB RUBEL 

Involvements : Tau Kappa Epsilon, Honor 
Court, Homecoming Court, KSCL 




JESSICA STEWART 



Involvements : SGA Correspondent for The Conglomerate, Basketball 

Secretary, sat on the Intercollegiate Athletics Committee, SGA 

Sophomore Senator, sat on SGA Elections Committee, Elected Vice 

President-Internal Affairs, Amnesty International, selected as the voting 

member by Centenary's chapter of Amnesty International for the AI 

National Convention, Centenary Outreach, Centenary Intramurals 

Official, Member of the core group for the 'Not With Our Money 

Campaign.'" 

"My grandmother told me that you can change the world just by living as 

an example. My involvement at Centenary is a reflection of this." 





56 1 Academics 





! f ri rn 








Involvements : SGA Freshman/Sophomore Senator and 

Secretary elect, Student Services committee, many 

SGA committees (including gummi bears day for 

Homecoming elections, co-organized Homecoming 

halftime events for presentation of the court, an- 
nounced the court at the game), Sigma Tau Delta, had 
work published in Le Tintemarre, Choir. Camerata, 
involved in Clubbing. 
"I am involved in a varitey of different things on 
campus. Even if I am not a member of a certain 
organization, I fully support, frequently attend, and 
even help out with several different activities and 
organizations." 



HANDY YEARWOOD 




Involvements : incoming SGA President, SGA Junior 
Senator, Chi Omega Recruitment Chair/New Member 
Educator, 1999 Orientation Team, Homecoming 
Duchess, Student Athlete Advisory Committee, 
Centenary Ladies Tennis Team Captain, ODK, Admis- 
sions Office Ambassador, The Conglomerate staff writer 
'T believe that [what makes me a Pacesetter is] that I 
have been actively involved in many organizations 
including a varsity sport. This shows the campus that 
athletes can and do participate in more than just their 
sport." 




Pacesetters 1 57 



HOW FUNKY IS 
YOUR 
CHICKEN? Senior 
Carolyn Morris takes 
some time to goof off 
for the children at 
Shriner's Hospital. 
She and other ODK 
members visit with the 
children there as a part 
of their service to the 
community. Morris 
says, "What can I say? 
I will do almost any- 
thing, including mak- 
ing a total fool out of 
myself, to make some 
sick children crack a 
smile!" 









jit " 




§F 



/ 



58 [organizations 














knows how to^ contribute 

By: Nikki Doughty 
The organizational fair is a much-anticipated event as 
students eagerly wander through the maze of tables 
trying to decide on which sign-up sheets they should 
write their names. Joining an organization offers stu- 
dents not only an opportunity to allow their individual 
talents to shine, but also a chance to make a contribu- 
tion back to the campus or neighboring community. The 
SGA contributes to the campus community by making 
sure it is a more enjoyable place for all. Students who 
have shined in their academic talents and campus 
involvement are selected for Maroon Jackets and/or 
ODK, organizations in which they give back to the 
community through various service projects. CAB 
members contribute much to student entertainment by 
organizing many fun events throughout the year. Stu- 
dents with special vocal talent are given the opportunity 
to shine in the prestigious Choir, and the Hall Councils 
and RH A work to make residence life as fun as possible 
for those fortunate enough to live on campus. Students 
with special communication skills may become involved 
in any of the media organizations, including The Con- 
glomerate , Pandora , and KSCL. With so many orga- 
nizations and so much talent going around, everyone 
knows how to make a contribution. 




Divider 1 59 



everybody 



xints 



sga addresses students' needs 



By:Aimee Miceli 




photo by: Sean Gilder 
, I HAVE A POINT. Freshman Senator Collin 
Taylor candidly speaks during a senate meeting. The sena- 
tors must speak their opinion in order to represent the class 
that he/she is representing. 




ALPHA CHI 



Why Did You 
Become Involved In 

SGA? 




"I enjoy the size of this 
school because it allows 
students a chance to be- 
come involved. I wanted 
to be on the SGA because 
I wanted to have input on 
important issues affecting 
students." 

Junior Senator 
Matthew Philbrook 




photo by: Llfetouch 



"I decided to run for 
Senator because I 
wanted to be more in- 
volved in the happen- 
ings on this campus. I 
believe the SGA is one 
of the most powerful 
bodies on campus. We 
help the most students 
with monetary support 
and good old fashioned 
work. " 

Junior Senator 
Mandy Yearwood 




photo by: Nikki Doughty 





Alpha Chi is 
the national 
scholastic 
honor society 
at Centenary. 
Membership 
is offered to 
students in 
the top 10% 
of the junior 
and senior 
class by 
GPA. Mem- 
bers attend a 
dinner meet- 
ing with a 
guest 
speaker. 
They may 
also present 
papers at 
meetings. 




ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 



Alpha Epsilon 
Delta is the 
national pre- 
med honor so- 
ciety for stu- 
dents with 45 
or more 

hours. Mem- 
bers are 
elected on the 
basis of their 
overall aca- 
demic perfor- 
mance in their 
science 
classes, char- 
acter, general 
ability, and 
personal traits 
befitting a 
physician. 



60 Organizations 




§" FEARLESS LEADER. Senior Dawson Taylor leads an SGA meeting. This was Taylor's 



"?? second term as SGA President. 



Q U O T A B L 



Q U O T 



"Serving as SGA President this year has been a true honor. The Senate 
has worked quite hard to ensure that students are served in the best way 
possible. This has been a year of changes and trying new things. We did 

not use tradition as an excuse." 
SGA President Dawson Taylor 




CAN YOU SAY THAT AGAIN? 
Sophomore Senator Drew Sutton listens 
closely during a senate meeting. 

DID YOU CATCH THAT? Sopho- 
more Senator Cristal Wilcox gets some 
practice for her position as next year's 
secretary by taking notes during a senate 
meeting. "I dig SGA. We have a blast 
spending the students' money, but we 
wish that they would come and get in- 
volved and see the great stuff we do," said 
Wilcox. 



Do you think SGA listens to the 
students? 



"Yes, I think they do a great job of 
listening to the students and 

addressing their needs." 
Sophomore Michelle Magee 





'f m " mm - r^l 


S^ 


' vL' ; -*s?fiJm [ 




^Sk. 




**J 


W | 




w 11 
AW.1 


I. 

■■ '**(■ ■ UM,*-'*W f ',,r.'''''4-'' ; 

* 




*■* 

"5 


— * 




ft 

V 




t — 


■si 


IB 


# 


■«c 


/""^■^i^Bl 


w 








g 
o 

-c 






;«3 ; 


ife 


m^^^L ■ * 1 




^^m 




' 


J A 


feiJfe^jd 




ip 




S^^^gj&^^M i 


If 


_: 


-,- 


lU . ■■■■ ■gtaj^^jgtSjS 



AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL 



Amnesty In- 
ternational is 
a worldwide 
movement 
that works to 
promote hu- 
man rights. 
The group 
has spon- 
sored two hu- 
man rights 
tables on 
campus, sent 
over 150 
pieces of 
mail, and sent 
representa- 
tives to the 
Annual Gen- 
eral Meeting 
in Nashville. 




BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 



The BSU is 
open to any 
student on 
campus. The 
students par- 
ticipate in 
weekly Dis- 
cipleship pro- 
grams, state 
BSU pro- 
grams in 
eluding Fall 
Convention, 
Spring As- 
s e m b I y , 
Evangelism 
Conference, 
and Interna- 
tional Stu- 
dent Activi- 
ties as well as 
support the 
summer mis- 
sion efforts. 



SGA Gl 



CRAM IT IN! Students who are well prepared will not feel the need to break any honor code 5 

o 

CD 

violations. Sophomore Brandon Larson spends plenty of time studying for his upcoming tests, g 
"I make sure to study enough for each test so that I am not tempted to cheat," states Larson. ~ 



QUOTA B L 



Q U O T 



"Serving as an advisor this year has given me more insight into Honor 
Court and how committed the student members of the Honor Court 

are." 
Advisor Bob Busieck 



KNOW THE RULES. Sophomore 
Kyle Aaron looks over the one of the 
Honor Code signs that is posted oustide 
each classroom door. It is important to 
know the rules of the code, and it is 
equally important for the justices on the 
court to understand them fully. "I feel it is 
an honor to be able to serve my fellow 
students on the Honor Court," states Jun- 
ior Christy Finch. 

QUIET IN THE HALLS! SeniorMark 
Duranski works diligently on a test in the 
hallway of Mickle. "I enjoy being able to 
take a test in the comfort of the hall rather 
than at a stiff desk," states Duranski. 





How do you feel serving as a 
member of the Honor Court? 



"I have loved serving on the 
Honor Court. I only wish more 
students knew exactly how the 
Honor Code works and the proce- 
dures of the Honor Court. " 
Senior Brandy Gunderson 





CENTENARY ACTIVITIES BOAR! 

President: Jean Ancelet; Vice President: Melissa Duplantis; 
Secretary/Treasurer: Sandi Snipe; Coffeehouse Chair: Crystal 
Carter; Movie Night Chair: Mary Meriam; Special Events Chair: 
Yvonne Juneau; Recruitment/Retention Chair: Ceci Salinas. 
Erin Bryan, Heidi Fahrenholtz, Katie Furr, Lisa Game, Meagan 
Gillett, Michelle Magee, Aimee Miceli, Mindy Montgomery, 
Amy Waguespack. 



CAB is com- 
posed of stu- 
dents who 
program ac- 
tivities and 
events for 
the enhance- 
ment of cam- 
pus life. The 
Board is re- 
sponsible for 
planning and 
implementa- 
tion of these 
events, 
which in- 
clude Freak 
Week and 
Spring Fling, 
among many 
others. 




CHURCH CAREERS 



Church Ca- 
reers is a 
place for stu- 
dents to 
come to- 
gether and 
explore their 
callings into 
ministry, 
both lay and 
ordained. 
The program 
gives mem- 
bers the ex- 
periences 
they need to 
approach 
many differ- 
ent types of 
ministries. 



62 Organizations 




1 19 11 11 II 
JL AV/X JLV-r JL 



integrity 



^"qk ""■"■"«■■ ^**±. jp***. 




justice is served with the honor court presiding 

By: Ashley Knecht 




What Should People 

Know About the 

Honor Court? 




"The purpose of the 
Honor Court is to uphold 
the integrity of this insti- 
tution, and I think we 
have done this pretty 
well." 

Blane Sessions, 
Senior 



photo by: Ashley 



"The make up of the 
Honor Court is very di- 
verse. I believe that the 
student body is well rep- 
resented." 

Abbey Broussard, 
Junior 





photo by: Ashley Knecht 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 
THINKING IT OVER. Junior Magan Graham realizes 

the full weight of the honor code. Breaking the code may 

result in serious punishment for those involved. 




THE CONGLOMERATE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief/Layout Editor: Evan McClanahan; Sports Edi- 
tor: Susan Larson; Arts & Entertainment Editor: Melanie Russell; 
News Editor: Susanna Miller, Anna Chatelain;Features Editor: 
Eric Gardner; Photography: Sean Gilder; Financial Manager: 
Tomieca Johnson; Circulation Manager: Leif Sherry; Web De- 
sign/Advertising Manager: Josh Fisher 



The Con- 
glomerate is 
the college 
newspaper. 
No experi- 
ence is nec- 
essary for 
staff mem- 
bers. Staff 
members 
meet weekly 
to put to- 
gether a 
weekly pub- 
lication re- 
cording the 
events of 
campus life. 




CENTENARY CREW 



The Cente- 
nary Crew 
rowing team 
was founded 
in 1998. 
Since then 
the team has 
enjoyed 
much suc- 
cess, finish- 
ing first in the 
Head of the 
Red tourna- 
ment and 
second in the 
Head of the 
Colorado 
tournament. 
No experi- 
ence is nec- 
essary for 
new rowers. 



Honor Court 



63 



■to; 




o 






crew team rows its way to a victorious season 

By: Nikki Doughty 




photo supplied by: Centenary Crew web site 



STRETCH. The Crew team does fast and furious rowing to cross the finish line in the Head of the Red 
competition. 




HONOR COURT 

Chief Justice: Blane Sessions; Associate Justice: Brandy 
Gunderson; Clerk: Maria Baiamonte; Clerk: Jennifer Gipson. 
Abbey Broussard, Amy Coaghenour, Christy Finch, Owen 
Mogabgab, Rob Rubel, Laura Walker. Faculty sponsors: Dr. 
David Bieler, Mr. Bob Busieck, Dr. Betsy Rankin. 



The Honor 
Court admin- 
isters the 
Honor Code. 
Members are 
nominated 
by the stu- 
dent body 
and faculty, 
and final se- 
lection is 
made by the 
present 
court. Stu- 
dents must 
have a 2.5 
g.p.a. to be 
considered. 




JAMES HALL COUNCIL 

President: Elizabeth Quillen; Vice President: Jennifer Watson; 
Secretary/Treasurer: Robyn Marchand; Historian: Vicki Kitner; 
Special Events Chair: Lindsey Hueber; Community Service: 
Ivy McLemore; Proper Rep.: Ursula Mckim; 1st Floor Annex 
Rep.: Kristin Ballard; 2nd Floor Annex Rep.: Sarah Stringer; 
RA Elect: Shannon Guzovich; Advisor: Kelly Stover. 



James Hall 
Council rep- 
resents the 
James Dorm 
on campus 
and works to 
make dorm 
life pleasing. 
The council 
participated 
and/or spon- 
sors several 
events, in- 
cluding: 
Homecom- 
ing Decorat- 
ing Party, 
Trick or Ter- 
ror, Sadie 
Hawkins 
Dance, Car- 
nation Sale, 
and more. 



64 Organizations 



STARTING OFF STRONG. The Crew team pushes off from the dock at the Head of the 



Red race. The Novice team placed first in the Head of the Red competition. 



POWERFUL 

PUSH. Crew 
members push off 
the dock at the 
Head of the Red 
competition, get- 
ing a powerful 




MAKING WAVES. Crew members row together to complete the Head of the Red competition. 
Teamwork is essential in Crew if they want to achieve victory. 













fcl ul ' 


'*-^. . . ^^^i, :;ii ^~- — • — ■ — ^'^ 




KSCL is a 




^1 




i" til 


no n-com- 
mercial, edu- 
cational ra- 




-oHhP 






dio station 




°ESM 






managed 




IWWJWVitfJ **> ^ \ f " ^^^f^ 


"\*^^^wHi^3. v '^L -J 


and operated 






~_f' - I ^ f i^^mmm^'J \ \-m\W fm^j' jjte" .- '"'f^n 




by students. 






2pt^| B \ 


/ 1 


KSCL acts 
as the only 








H- HI 1 


progressive 






'a. 4Sfc ■ ^H" ' 




radio station 






■W^U: /II^^L^^ 




in the 
metroplex. 










Scheduling 
occurs at the 
beginning of 










KSCL91.3FM 




the semes- 
ter, and new 






(see page 77 for a roster) 




DJ's are al- 
ways wel- 
come. 






LEADING LADIES DANCE LINE 

Captain: Keeley Lamed; Co-Captain: Emily Primeaux. Joy 
Banks, Angela Cage, Jennifer Crain, Vanessa Curtis, Laura 
Harper, Lauren Herndon, Vicki Kintner, Laura Lindsey, 
Wendy Paul, Amanda Rundell, Lauren Stallings. 



The Leading 
Ladies 
Dance Line 
performs 
dances and 
promotes 
spirit at the 
basketball 
games. Try- 
outs are held 
annualy in 
the Spring 
and all are 
invited to ap- 
ply. 

Crew 65 



EN EARS. Junior Meagen Gillett and other CAB members listen up as Junior Ceci £ 
Salinas offers an idea during a CAB meeting. Gillett says, "I really enjoyed CAB's coffeehouse •§ 
because of the plethora of diverse music that is introduced at the events. Besides, how can you § 
say no to coffee and cookies?" 



Q U T A B L 



Q U T 



"CAB is an organization that provides students with a unique opportunity. 
It is this organization that keeps Centenary's campus full of entertainment. 
The more students who voice their opinion to CAB members, or who join 
CAB and voice their opinion in meetings, the more diverse and the better 

campus events could be." 

Junior Yvonne Juneau 



TALES. Members of 
the student body crowd into the Shell to 
share scary stories in Tales of Terror, an 
event sponsored by CAB during the an- 
nual Freak Week. 



Senior Mary 
Meriam climbs a ladder in the SUB to 
hang decorations for Freak Week. A big 
part of being a CAB member is working to 
advertise for the events. 






' 






1 










■--■-—. .. 






1 


2 








mf*&. J 


*y^ jl 


r, ^m^wM 

JHjfe'K Mm 




y£ ™ 






._.. r Jr 4 ~ 


■ 1 


Ba ' 












V-* ** 


jj/& I 



photo by: Mary Meriam 



What do you enjoy about CAB? 



"I enjoy CAB. It is fun to plan 
events and meet performers. I am 
looking forward to being coffee- 
house and comedy chair." 
Junior Erin Bryan 





MATH CLUB 

President: Courtney Patterson; Jazz Alibalic, Maria 
Baiamonte, Christy Finch, Katie Williamson. Faculty Advi- 
sors: Derrick Head; Mark Schlatter (not pictured); David 
Thomas. 



The Math 
Club pro- 
vides infor- 
mation and 
assistance to 
students pur- 
suing math 
as a major or 
career. 




PANDORA STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief: Bianca McKnight; Literary Editor: Crystal 
Carter; Art Editor: Joanna Tagert; Music Editor: Chris Jay; 
Layout and Online Editor: Austin Meyers; Faculty Advisor: 
Dr. Bryan Alexander. 



Pandora is 
Centenary's 
literary maga- 
zine. Pub- 
lished once a 
semester, the 
magazine 
features the 
poetry, prose, 
artwork, and 
photography 
of students. 
The editor is 
selected by 
the Media 
Sub-Commit- 
tee. 



66 Organizations 



the 



"t; 




cab fills calendar with exciting events 

By: Mary Meriam 



Why Should Someone 

Become Involved In 

CAB? 




"So they can help choose 

who comes to campus 

to perform." 

Lisa Game, 

Sophomore 



photo by: Mary Meriam 



"Because it is fun and 

they would get to help 

plan events." 

Sandi Snipe, 

Junior 




photo by; Mary Meriam 




photo by: Mary Meriam 
RAIGHT Senior Katie 
Furr talks with Juniors Erin Bryan and Yvonne Juneau about 
upcoming CAB events. CAB members put a lot of thought 
and time into preparing the events so that no details are left 
out. 




RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION 

Julia Bailey, Erin Bryan, Doug Bryson, Rachael Day, Lauren 
Herndon, Tomeica Johnson, Corey McMullin, Christy Melton, 
Courtney Patterson, Amy Sullivan, Nicole Vaughn, Jennifer 
Watson. Faculty Advisor: Mark Miller. 



RHA mem- 
bers are 
elected from 
each hall. The 
Council as- 
sists with pro- 
gramming, 
governance, 
and discipline 
in their re- 
spective halls. 
The Council is 
one of three 
judicial 
boards on 
campus and 
functions as a 
governing 
body. 




SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 

President: Melanie Russell; VP Membership: Courtney 
Rhodes; VP Ritual: Sarah King; Seargant-at-Arms/Corre- 
sponding Secretary: Montie Thomas; Treasurer: Amanda 
Morrison; Recording Secretary: Sara Beth Starks; Frater- 
nity Education: Katie Fur. Allison Courville, Melanie Rawle, 
Amy Sturdivant. 



The Eta 
Lambda 
chapter of 
Sigma Alpha 
lota Interna- 
tional Music 
Fraternity is 
responsible 
for ushering 
all events in 
Hurley and 
serving re- 
ceptions after 
recitals. Ev- 
ery spring the 
chapter hosts 
Lagniappe, a 
recital for fac- 
ulty members 
from the mu- 
sic depart- 
ment. 

CAB 67 



all.. 




notes 



choir members showcase their talent 

By: Sean Gilder 





LOAD 'EM UP! Choir members must have strong HUNGER PAINS. Juniors Keith Lawson, Amanda Mustin and 
muscles as well as strong voices! They work hard in the rain Freshmen Maria Moores and Collin Taylor line up for a home- 
to load heavy equipment into the truck after a tour. cooked meal during a tour. 



?UP filgi 


;.-.-^ '>«. '■ ■ 


>. ■■ • f-w*.^W2 


■.TT-Uli--'^ 


s*jto» $:,..-. 






•' *E <i ■ -V.- 




..ItiJi *?■* 


Ml** "'•' 


■-JjBBtmiM 




#-,, ! 


•-t 


7*1 


" ■' 4k4tMk *''--- 


- 




wttfl**-* 


I 4h^i^i'^^- 


r^MMftj? 




iuMfiWfcwl 


....... 


■ tv ^ AJ ^'- 


> ^^ -M^J 


-j*"?-.~. ^ . 




. 1 


i 


• -^y<^i^§ 


"*""*^ 








Ifc * >, .- - riLW\^f .."gt Rlfc'ftM 


., ■- 


^—^^■i 


^Tx^^J 




^_ 






4W H- 



CHOIR 



The Cente- 
nary College 
Choir started 
the year off 
with its annual 
choir camp, 
where all the 
music for the 
upcoming 
year is 

learned. They 
also toured all 
over Louisi- 
ana, Texas, 
and Georgia 
as well as En- 
gland, Ireland, 
and Wales. 
Their annual 
Rhapsody in 
View was a 
success, and 
they were 
asked to sing 
at the White 
House. 




SIGMA TAU DELTA 

President: Anna Chatelain; Vice President: Amy 
Coughenour; Secretary: Crystal Carter; Treasurer: Shan- 
non Richardson. Faculty advisor: Dr. Jeff Hendricks. 



After a two 
year absence 
Sigma Tau 
Delta has re- 
turned to cam- 
pus. The Na- 
tional English 
Honor Society 
boasts 17 ini- 
tiated mem- 
bers and 14 
associate 
members. 
The organiza- 
tion spon- 
sored 
v a r i o u o s 
speakers, 
workships, 
and special 
events, such 
as Poedown 
and 
Hohohodown. 



68 Organizations 




PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. Senior Choir members Dawson Taylor and Lee Parker 
read their music as they practice a song during choir practice. 



WHERE IT 
ALL BE- 
GAN. Choir 
members visit 
the original 
Centenary Col- 
lege campus in 
Jackson, Loui- 
siana in March 
duringtheirtour 
of South Loui- 



A SPECIAL 
WAIT. The 
Choir stands 
outside the 
White House 
in Washington 
D.C. as they 
prepare for 
theirupcoming 
performance. 
This was the 
fourth year in a 
row they were 
invited to sing 
at the White 
House. 




ULTIMATE FRISBEE 



The Frisbee 
Club prac- 
tices regu- 
larly on the 
Jones-Rice 
field. Aside 
from prac- 
tices they 
participate in 
competition. 
Anyone who 
is interested 
may join. 




t» i "iyy3 ; j» 



YONCOPIN STAFF 

Editor: Nikki Doughty; Photography Editor: Sean Gilder. 
Jennifer Hawkins, Lauren Herndon, Yvonne Juneau, Ashley 
Knecht, Michelle Magee, Mary Meriam, Aimee Miceli, Mindy 
Montgomery, Amy Waguespack. 



The 
Yoncopin 
Staff pro- 
duces the 
yearbook. 
They meet 
once a week 
to prepare 
layouts, 
story ideas, 
photo- 
graphs, and 
meet their 
deadlines. 
They are in 
charge of 
school pic- 
tures also. 
Anyone who 
is interested 
may join. 



(Mr 69 



LENDING A HELPING HAND. Seniors Bianca McKnight and Elizabeth Prince spend £| 
time with children in the hospital as part of one of their ODK service projects. 



Q U O T A B L 



Q U O T 



"It was an honor serving as an officer for the past year, and I see a 

wonderful future ahead for ODK with the new initiates and officers." 

Senior Ashley Knecht 



A PRESTI- 
G I O U S 
GROUP, The 
proud and excited 
new ODK mem- 
bers gather with the 
old members after 
the initiation cer- 
emony in Brown 
Chapel. 

CHOW TIME. 
Junior Jeanne 
Rasberry and other 
new ODK initiates 
enjoy being treated 
to a celebratory 
dinner at Nicky's 
mexican restaurant 
after the initiation 
ceremony. 



, 





STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 



The Student 
Governent 
Association is 
the governing 
body of the 
campus com- 
munity. Sena- 
tors and offic- 
ers are 
elected by the 
student body. 
They meet 
regularly to 
make deci- 
sions that will 
improve life at 
the college. 






UNITED METHODIST 
STUDENT MOVEMENT 



The United 
Methodist 
Student 
Movement 
sponsors 
weekly Bible 
studies, and 
occasional 
service 
projects, re- 
treats, and 
fellowship 
events. Any- 
one who is in- 
terested can 
join. 



70 1 Organizations 








The 

Head 

Honchos 



ob Presidents 



^ * i 



^^^_^^___ 




omicron delta kappa helps others through service 

By: Mindy Montgomery 



Why Should Someone 
Become Involved In 

ODK? 




_ 



"Because ODK is great!" 

Jeanne Rasberry, 
Junior 



photo by: Lifetouch 



"It is really an honor to 






be inducted into ODK. 


i^HBTiTl 




I'm very glad I've had 


*§**- 


40 J-:-. 1 


this opportunity." 






Aimee Miceli, 






Junior 







photo by: Lifetouch 




Ashley Knecht 




photo by: Ashley Knecht 
CLOWNING AROUND. Senior Bianca McKnight 
clowns around a litle bit in the hospital to make the children 
laugh. She enjoys helping others and likes to have fun while 
doing it. 



Alpha Psi Omega 



Amnesty International 





Dani Garza 



Thomas Horton 



ODK hi 



beautiful 



musi 





hurley chamber orchestra fills campus with music 

By: Nikki Doughty 




MASTERING NEW MATERIAL. Orchestra mem- 
bers work hard during practice to play a piece to perfection. 
They must put many hours of practice into a piece of music 
in order to play it flawlessly. 



energy and passion for the music as he conducts the orchestra 
during one of their practices. 




Ccinterbury of Centenary 



Black Student Alliance 




• • • < 



Tomieca Johnson 




Jean Ancelet 



^Organizations 




Centenary Crew 




*grtw J 



Lee Parker 



"§. THE SOUNDS OF MUSIC. The sounds of music flowing out of the windows of Hurley on 
§ Monday and Wednesday nights are from the Hurley Chamber Orchestra. The whole orchestra 
practices on Monday nights with a string sectional on Wednesday nights. 



THE CHO- 
SEN ONES. 

Orchestra 
members had 
to go through 
auditions in or- 
der to be se- 
lected as a 
member of the 
ensemble. 
They may even 
receive credit 
for their work. 

PULLING 
STRINGS. 
Orchestra 
members 
must rehearse 
often in order 
to be prepared 
for the perfor- 
mances they 
have several 
times through- 
out the year. 



Centenary Environmental 
Citizens 




Jamie Asbury 



Centenary Outreach 




Laci Adams 



Hurley Chamber Orcfrestra 33 




Senior RHA President Courtney Patterson writes the meeting's 
agenda on the board. "My term as RHA President has been one of the most demanding and one 
of the most rewarding tasks I have ever taken on," says Patterson. 



LISTEN 
UP. Seniors 
Erin Bryan, 
Corey 
McMullin and 
Juniors Julia 
Bailey and 
T o m e i c a 
Johnson listen 
carefully as 
Freshman 
RHA Secre- 
tary/Treasurer 
gives her re- 
port. "I really 
enjoy being a 
member of 
RHA because 
I wanted to be 
involved in 
making 
changes for 
the residents at 
Centenary," 
Sullivan said. 

MAKING 
CHANGES. 
Freshman 
Amy Sullivan 
and Seniors 
Erin Bryan and 
Courtney 
Patterson look 
over the new 
constitution. 
RHA worked 
hard this year 
on making 
Centenary bet- 
ter recognized 
on a national 
level. "Our 
school experi- 
ence is more 
than educa- 
tion, and the 
quality oflife on 
campus is im- 
portant," Bryan 
said. 




no photo 
available 



Centenary Outreach 



Samantha Evans 




Laci Adams 



74 [organizations 



' 



care 



*~&£ 



rha works to improve residence life 







By: Lauren Herndon 




photo by: RHA 
GROUP DISCUSSION. RHA Members listen to another mem- 
ber voice an opinion during a meeting. Meetings are the time for 
members to come together and discuss ideas that would make 
residence life more beneficial to everyone. 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 
MEETING OF THE MINDS. Board members discuss 
a proposal given by Junior Christy Melton to allocate funds 
for members to attend the NACURH conference which is 
held three times a year. "We get to share ideas on how to 
improve our campus community, maintain campus safety, 
and encourage active participation in campus events," Se- 
nior Tomeica Johnson said. 



Centenary Students for 
Cultural Diversity 




Chemistry Club 
(Alpha Sigma Chi) 



Bianca McKnight 




Valerie Curtis 



Choir 


Hi-') 


r i 




no photo 
available 




>- 





Jerry Don Han 



RHA 75 



that 



1\ ■ '.:'■;.■■■•■. 
■ 



rciui 




kscl presents entertaining broadcasts 

By: Mindy Montgomery 




photo courtesy of: Conglomerate staff 

BULL. Senior Rob Rubel and Junior 
Matthew Philbrook hang out in the KSCL office where they 
are DJs for a popular show that students anticipate weekly. 



Why Should Someone 
Become Involved In 

KSCL? 




"I think it's a really good 
media for students to get 
across their musical 
taste and stuff you don't 
hear on a regular basis." 
Freshman 
Benedict Chatelain 



photo by: Mindy Montgomery 
"I like music, marginal 
music, that people don't 
hear all the time. KSCL 
offers that to the public. 
For the DJs; it's like a 
big resource of music," 
Junior Sandi Snipe 




photo by: Mindy Montgomery 







Club Presidents 

76 1 Organizations 



College Republicans 



no photo 
available 



Cody McDonald 



Cline Hall Council 



• • 




Andrew Irby 




DIE HARD DJ. Senior KSCL enthusiast and Program Director Margo Shideler loves doing 
her show. "Being able to work at KSCL is probably one of my proudest achievements at 
Centenary. The otehr staff members, DJs, and music here are all so great, and it's so much fun!" 

TOUGH 
WORK. Things 
can get pretty crazy 
at the KSCL station, 
especially when 
there are dis- 
gruntled staff mem- 
bers. Sophomore 
Keturah Cummings 
and Senior Chris 
Brown are redy to 
duke it out. "We're 
not as mean as we 
look," says Brown. 

KSCL STAFF. Monica 
Anderson, Jennifer Bato, Justin 
Beacham, Chris Brown, Clint 
Bruce, Crystal Carter, Anna 
Chatelain, Benedict 
Chatelain.McKinley 
Cota, Keturah Cummings, Grace 
Dickson, Dominique 
Ducote.Samantha Evans, Jeff 
Everson,Eric Gardner, Megan 
Gillette, Teresa Gillilan, Julie 
Greene, Jonathan Hammett, 
Scott Handley, Michael 

Harper, Tom Horton, Katie 
Howell, Chris Jay,Tomieca 
Johnson, David Jones.Justin 
Kirkes.Luke McClung, Corey 
McMullin.Rolin Moe, Linda 
Montgomery, Zach 
Mort, Harmony Newman, Chase 
Olson, Parrin Patterson, Matthew 
Philbrook, Billy Pritchard, Michael 
Ranns.Rob Rubel, Margo 
Shideler.Sandi Snipe, J.W. 
Steves, Joanna Tagert, Terra 
Tatum, Tommy Welch, William 
Wells, Jennifer West, Patrick Wil- 
liams 



The Conglomente 




FCA 



Evan McClanahan 





Noah Ward 



KSCL ft 



THE BIG THREE. Senior Evan McClanahan, Editor-in-Chief, Junior Anna Chatelain and 
Sophomore Susanna Miller, News Editors, work on a Wednesay night, the dreaded layout night. 
Chatelain and Miller edited the entire newspaper, wrote stories, and found at least a million errors 
over the course of the year. McClanahan made lots of orders, wrote crass editorials, and tried 
to keep the ship above water. 



Q U O T 



Q U O T 



"If I hadn't been part of The Conglomerate, my college career would have 

been very incomplete. It taught me several valuable lessons, gave me the 

opportunity to see what i was capable of, and greatly helped me find 

quality employment upon graduation. College life goes by very quickly. 

Putting my thoughts in print sure helped slow it down." 

Senior Evan Mc Clanahan, Editor-in-Chief 

HANGING AROUND. Senior 
Melanie Russell and Junior Crystal Carter 
also helped make The Conglomerate a 
reality. Russell took the assignment of a 
full A&E page and, as editor, filled it 
consistently from week to week. Carter, 
a newcomer to The Conglomerate, wrote 
lucid and descriptive stories and turned 
them in promptly on time, a rare feat in 
The Conglomerate's history. 

SPREADING THE 
WORD. Josh and Levi 
both work to maintain The 
Conglomerate's website. 
Levi built the illustrious 
www.centenary.edu/stu- 
dents/congo and Josh dili- 
gently maintained it every 
week. In addition, Josh 
worked as the advertising 
manager and made The 
Conglomerate gobs and 
gobs of money. Okay, so 
maybe not gobs and gobs.. . 






Grunt Team 
(Special Olppics) 




Club Presidents 

78 1 Organizations 



Abby McMurry 



Hardin Hall Council 







Tomieca Johnson 








spreadin 




the conglomerate informs and excites students 

By: Evan McClanahan 



Why Should Someone 
Become Involved In 
The Conglomerate? 



"I think it is great to become involved with The 
Conglomerate because it is really important to get 
information out to the students. Also, working for The 
Conglomerate gives memany important skills that I 
hope to use later in life. Last but not least, a little extra 
money never hurt anyone." 

Ashlie Daigle, 
Freshman; 

Features Editor 

"Becoming involved with The Conglomerate is per- 
haps the best way to make connections all over 
campus. Every time you write a story, you establish 
contact with the students, administrators, or faculty. 
Conversely, others come to recognize you through 
your work with the paper." 

Clint Bruce, 

Senior; 

Staff Writer & Satire Editor 




photo by: Conglomerate staff 
MEETING HIGH DEMANDS. Senior Susan Larson 
and Freshman Ashlie Daigle wor as Sports and Features 
Editors (respectively) for The Conglomerate. Both performed 
admirably as they were given tasks never asked of those 
positions previously: they both filled an entire page devoted 
only to their areas of interest. 



Honor Court 





Carter Benton 



Joci Pettan 



Tie Conglomerate | ?9 



with 





pandora's fire edition blazes with talent 



By: Mary Meriam 




GETTING THE THOUGHTS DOWN. Junior Aimee FIRE The theme of this year's edtion of Pandora is Fire. The 

McQueen sits at her desk and works on a possible submis- magazine came in a box containing various forms of creative pieces 

sion to Pandora. The literary magazine is a way for students inside. The magazine is available for all students to pick up at the 

to discover their fellow peers' creative abilities. end of the year. 




Maroon Cross 



• • 




Susanna Miller 



Club Presidents 

80 1 Organizations 



Chris Brown 




WORKING LATE. Sophomore Lisa Game stays comfortable in her pajamas while she 
works late one night in her dorm room putting together a piece for Pandora. Staff members 
review the submissions made by students before the pieces are published. 

LETTING THE JUICES FLOW. 
Sophomore Randi Smith hangs out in her 
dorm room as she writes a piece of cre- 
ative work for Pandora. The staff encour- 
ages students to submit creative writing, 
art, music, and other creative pieces to 
the literary magazine. There are various 
submission deadlines throughout the year. 

SILLY SHOT. The Pandora staff 
clowns around while they make an at- 
tempt to take a group picture. The staff 
meets during the week to discuss dead- 
lines, submissions, publicity, and other 
orders of business that must be attended 
to. 




Maroon Jackets 




Math Club 



Jeff Everson 




Courtney Patterson 




Pandora 81 



3 UF Sophomore Luke McClung gives the old thumbs up to a film N 
one evening before a show. Film Society tries to show films that will promote and encourage the £ 
appreciation and study of films as an art form and important cultural document. 



Q U O T 



Q U O T 



"I love Film Society. Here we are in the second week of finals, and I 

still haven't gotten paid!" 

Freshman Zach Mort 



3GETHER. Junior 
Film Society member Mindy Montgomery 
tests out a tape in her VCR on the 
afternoon before a show. Film society 
members must make sure all the equip- 
ment is working properly in order to en- 
sure a successful show. 

MAIL CALL Senior Ryan Oswald 
checks the mail before heading to a film 
showing. Some of the films shown this 
year included Titus, The Virgin Suicides, 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show, and 
Bringing Up Baby. 





photo by: Mindy Montgomery 



What do you think Film Society 
offers to other people? 



"Film Society exposes people to 

films they may not otherwise have 

a chance to see." 

Senior Ryan Oswald 




le 





Club Presidents 

82 1 Organizations 



Outdoor Adventure Society 



Elizabeth Prince 




Bianca McKnight 





Physics Club 



( — 




"> 




g^^^\ 






wml!ff-C%)\ 






B" - *^ ~ T 





Thomas Horton 



aoyo— s 



■: ■ - ■ ■■ ■■:*■■ ■ ■■ ■ : 

famous^. r\ 




minutes 



film society reels students in 

By:Mindy Montgomery 



Why Should Someone 

Become Involved In 

Film Society? 




"You get a chance to see 

movies that you've never 

heard of before." 

Casey Muller, 

Freshman 



photo by: Mindy Montgomery 

"Anything that shows 
enough insane scien- 
tists, nuclear weapons, 
and subtitles can't be all 
bad." 
Luke McCIung, 
Sophomore 




photo by: Mindy Montgomery 




photo by: Mindy Montgomery 
Sophomore Austin 
Meyers and Dr. Hendricks, Film Society's faculty advisor, 
introduce a film together before a showing. The renovations 
of the auditorium allowed film nights to be even more enjoy- 
able. 



• 

9 








• 

Prelaw Society 

I ™ ' " i 

■ 




RHA 


! 


r a 




Courtney Patterson 

• 
• 
• 


Brandon Lawson 



Film Society 83 



MAN BASHING PARTY! Sexton Hall sponsored a Man Bashing Party during the month 
of March. It involved a lot of good, but maybe not so "clean" fun. Freshman Ashlie Daigle says 
she "particularly enjoyed taking out her aggressions on Casey Muller." From the looks of things, 
she took out a LOT of her aggressions. 



QUOTA & L 



Q U O T 



"Rotary Hall Council had great members this year and because of that we 
had a more active role than in years past. This year's council not only 
addressed the concerns of Rotary Hall, but also increased its role on campus 
through the well-attended Hollywood Squares event in the fall semester. We 
have fun at the meetings, but we also work to fix problems in the Rotary Hall." 
Senior Corey McMullin, Rotary Hall President 



GOOFING Freshmen Sharon 

Basham and Jennifer Watson have fun at 
the Sadie Hawkins dance sponsored by 
James Hall Council. Basham announces, 
"Kiss this!" 

WHAT TALENT! Freshmen Justin 
Kirkes, Casey Muller, and Junior Jason 
Beckham wow the audience with their 
comedic routine and acrobatics at the 
first annual Sexton Hall No-Talent talent 
show. Beckham said, "We thought that 
the [show] would be the perfect opportu- 
nity to show our true feelings for one 
another." 





photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 



What has been the best part of 

your experience as a member of 

hall council? 

"The best experiences I have had 
as James hall Council president 
would have to have been when 
my AWESOME hall council pulled 
together a series of events during 
Homecoming! We organized the 
Decorating Party and Sadie 
Hawkins Dance. ..[and] the 
Valentine's Day Carnation Sale! 
Who can forget the Miss-ter Cen- 
tenary Pageant. ..We are the 
champs two years running!" 
Junior Elizabeth QuiNen 




Mertowne Players 




Rotary Hall Council 



Club Presidents 
84 |Organizations 





Dawson Taylor 



ft 




a 



tell 



hall council makes the most of living on campus 



By: Jennifer Hawkins 



Why Should Someone 

Become Involved In 

Hall Council? 




photo, by: Jennifer Hawkins 



"Hall Council is a great 
way to stay involved, 
know what is going on 
on campus, and meet all 
the incoming students." 
Junior Christy 
Melton 



"Hall Council is a great 
way to participate in cam- 
pus life. You have the 
opportunity to ensure 
resident safety, well-be- 
ing, and health, as well 
as create a hospitable 
and friendly atmosphere." 
Senior Tomieca 
Johnson 




photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 




photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 
Freshmen Katie McKay and Joseph Robideaux 

pose for their picture at the Sadie Hawkins Dance sponsored 

by James Hall Council. McKay says, "Joe was awesome, 

and we had so much fun taking a break and kicking back." 




Eric Huffinan 



Sexton Hall Council 




Christy Melton 



Sigma Alpha Ma 




Melanie Russell 



Hall Councils 85 




N. Rev. Jack O'Dell holds a ALL EARS. Students listen closely to Senior Eric Huffman as he 
loaf of bread in his hands as he prepares to offer Commun- 



ion. Communion is celebrated at the end of each Stepping 
Stones service. 



speaks during a service. As with performers, those who wish to 
speak are welcome to do so. 




Speech Club 




TNTS 
(The Non-Traditional 



ISfl 


Student) 


• • • 


r a 

no photo 
available 




Carter Benton 



Club Presidents 

86 |Organizatioris 



Ben Cunningham 




LOVE THY NEIGHBOR. Junior Matthew Philbrook shares a hug with Junior Pepper 
Kaufman during a Stepping Stones service. Many of those attending the service shared hugs 
with their neighbors. 

= _ - ^ a ^ YOUR 

PRAYERS. Stu- 
dents kneel in 
prayer during a 
Stepping Stones 
meeting. Stepping 
Stonesisanon-de- 
nominational, 
Christian praise 
and worship ser- 
vice dedicated to 
providing an atmo- 
sphere where ev- 
eryone feels com- 
f o r t a b I e 
worshiping. 

MERRY 
MELODIES. 
Sophomore Doug 
Bryson plays the 
guitar during a 
Stepping Stones 
service. Those who 
wish to give a per- 
formance during a 
service are wel- 
come to do so. A 
vairety of perform- 
ers have made ap- 
pearances during 
Stepping Stones 
services. 



II! 




Lee Palter 



Ultimate Frisbee Club 




Matthew Philbrook 




Odd Doughty 



Stepping Stones 1 8? 



SNUGGLING UP 
CLOSE. Freshmen 
Amy Lange and John 
Rabenhorst playfully 
share a jacket to keep 
warm at the Home- 
coming tailgate party. 
The tailgate party oc- 
curred after the pa- 
rade. 



88 1 People 





w ^ tm _^^^ ^^^^^ 






knows new -^ memories 

By: Nikki Doughty 
After working hard to rack up those hours students 
are excited to classify themselves into their new cat- 
egory of sophomore, junior, or senior. Then there are 
the freshmen, who are thrilled to be out of high school 
and eager to become upperclassmen. No matter which 
grade classification they are a part of, the students 
eventually merge into one big group, becoming a family. 
You can find them at any of the campus hangouts or in 
the SUB watching The Price is Right . Boys have no 
problem meeting girls thanks to the boy/girl ratio, and 
the rising number of engagements proves that some 
couples were lucky enough to find true love. Room- 
mates may have fought like siblings from time to time, 
but at least they didn't have their parents around telling 
them to clean their dorm rooms. A rash of student 
crimes broke out over the year. Maybe it was those 
seniors going through senioritis! Campus eating turned 
out to be a sensitive topic, and students looked forward 
to breaks when they could get some nice home-cooked 
meals. Much excitement buzzed around campus as 
students interacted through their daily activities, and as 
their bonds grew stronger new memories formed to last 
a lifetime. 




Divider 1 89 




Jimmy Allen 
lean Ancelet 
Maria Baiamonte 
Lewis Bell 
David Campbell 



lenelle Cockerham 
lanna Ellenburg 
Emily Elliott 
Jessica Fant 
Lillian Fields 



Kathryn Furr 
Eric Gardner 
Rebecca Geihsler 
Angela Hale 
lamie Hearne 



Dawn Herrold 
)ason Hoeltzel 
Lindsay Holman 
Thomas Horton 
Miroslav Hie 



Edwin Isaacs 
Jennifer Jackson 
Jerry Don Killian 
Ashley Knecht 
Susan Larson 



Larry Loocke 
Evan McClanahan 
David McCormick 
Gregory McGehee 
Mary Meriam 



90 |People 





photo by: Sean Gilder 
VOICE OF AN ANGEL. Senior 

Rebecca Geihsler sings some notes in a 

dem lab. 



what's in store? 




photo by: Michelle Magee 

"Grad school!" 

Mary Meriam, 

Senior 



'■- p&j 


■■ 


■ % g > 




' ^ 












4 ■ ■ ■-. 




photo by: Lifetouch 





"I am looking forward to 
graduation and this sum- 
mer." 

Greg McGehee, 
Senior 



The Finish L 



me 



seniors enjoy their last year 

By: Michelle Magee 




SENIORS 
WITH 
STYLE. Se- 
niors Nicole 
Vaughn, 
Evette Barnes, 
and Valerie 
Curtis pose for 
one last Bid 
Day shotto kick 
off their senior 
year. 



photo by: David Maroski 





photo by: Michelle Magee 

ROCKING AND ROLLING. Senior 
Ellie Wallace spends a little down time with 
her sorority sister, Sophomore Dani Murphy, 
while they watch an intramural game on the 
Jones-Rice field. 

BOOGIE SHOES. Seniors Dawson 
Taylor and Nola Sieber take some time off 
from the hard work of their classes to enjoy 
a little fun on the dance floor. 



hoto courtesy of: Public Relations 




THE END, For some the 
end seemed to never come. 
For others it came too soon. 
For everyone, graduation 
was the final reward for all 
the work done in school. Dr. 
Lefevers gathers with some 
students at the commence- 
ment ceremony in May. 



Senioritis 91 




students flock to the SUB for The Price is Right 

By: Mary Meriam 




GETTING INVOLVED. 
Sophomore Celeste Nash and 
Junior Katie White like to watch 
The Price is Right interactively. 
"It is an interactive show," says 
Nash. "Lots of people and I like 
to comment on the contestants." 

VEGGING AROUND. 
Junior Bryan Ehricht and Se- 
nior Rob Rubel make them- 
selves comfortable on the couch 
in the SUB for the hour-long 
program. "I like to just sit and 
relax. After all the thinking I do, 
it is nice to watch something 
where I don't have to think," 
says Ehricht. 

Rolin Moe 
Carolyn Morris 
Kaissar Najjar 
loanna Panos 
Lee Parker 




Why do you want 
Price is Right? 




"Because not only 
is it entertaining, it 
also makes fun of 
our culture. It 
should be an FYE 
event." 

John 

Rabenhorst, 

Freshman 



"So that when I go 

on the show I can 

win." 

Ceci Salinas, 

Junior 





"Because Bob 

Barker is a god." 

Keith Lawson, 

Senior 






Emily Pinnix 
Amanda Rankin 
Shannon Richardson 
Melanie Russell 
Maria Saucier 







V-.'i \ 



*<\W0i 





92 lPeopl( 




• IT'S TIME!!! Freshman Patrick McCuller 
gets ready for another day's session of The 
Price is RightwWh Freshman Sharon Basham. 

: Basham doesn't miss a minute of the daily 
show. She says, "It's ten o'clock! It's ten 

: o'clock! It's time iorThe Price is Right" 

SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN! Fresh- 
man Patrick McCuller battles it out with Fresh- 
man John Rabenhorst in an argument over 
the showcase showdown. "I told you not to 
pick the second showcase," argues McCuller. 
"The first is better!" 



- 





A 



If you could get 
on The Price is 
Right what game 
would you play? 

"PLINKO!!!" 
Katie McKay, 
Freshman 




Q 

a 

3 



Top 5 

reasons people watch The Price is Bight 

1. It's on TV when they check their mail. 

2. They like to veg. 

3. They like to make fun of people. 

4. It is funny. 

5. It has been on forever. 







What is your fa- 
vorite game on 
The Price is 
Right? 

"The dice game 
for a car. I like 
the big dice." 
Spencer Morell, 
Freshman 



TIME FOR 
SOME R&R 
AND SOME 
PRICE IS 
RIGHT! Senior 
Jason Hoeltzel 
gets to the SUB 
after morning 
classesjustintime 
to make the show. 
Watching the 
show gives stu- 
dents the opportu- 
nity to rest and re- 
lax for a bit be- 
tween all of their 
tough classes. 



Blane Sessions 
Dawson Taylor 
Laura Walker 
Anna Walls 
Zach Vaughn 




Randy Young 



The Price is Right\ 93 



The 




ace 




hanging out on campus 



By: Aimee Miceli 



STUDYING 

AND SOCIAL- 
IZING. Senior 
Laura Walker, Jun- 
ior Matthew 
Philbrook, and 
Sophomore Har- 
mony Newman 
hang out in the li- 
brary where many 
students choose to 
socialize while 
they study. "That's 
what the library is 
all about: hanging 
out," says 
Newman. 



HHsr * J 




W'*wBm 




HPr. wEr 


yQ i ^BH 


IP^^L^I 






1 i ml 




• '^SvSa 



photo by: Aimee Miceli 




photo 

WORKING AND PLAYING. Juniors Pepper 
Kaufman and Jennifer West chill out in the SUB 
while Kaufman works at the information center. "I 
hang out here because Pepper works here," says 
West. 

SWING TIME. One of the most popular places 
to hang out on campus is the swing outside the 
cafe. Juniors Christy Melton, Ceci Salinas, and 
Freshman Casey Muller take full advantage of the 
spot. "The swing is my favorite place to hang out on 
campus," says Salinas. 




photo by: Aimee Miceli 




photo by: Aimee Miceli 

TV TIME. Freshmen Patrick 
McCuller,. Sharon Basham, John 
Rabenhorst, and Amy Sullivan 
watch a little television while hang- 
ing out in the SUB. "I come here to 
watch The Price is Right, because 
it is my dream to be on it some- 
day," says Sullivan. 



photo by: Ashley Knecht 

CROWD PLEASERS. Stu- 
dents hang out on the benches on 
Jones-Rice field during an intra- 
mural softball game. Many stu- 
dents can be found rooting for 
their teams during intramural 
games. 



photo by: Ashley 

SIT BACK AND RELAX. 
Junior Elizabeth Lecky reads at 
one of the study tables in the li- 
brary. Students flock to the library 
to study, play on the computers, 
or just to hang out and catch up on 
the latest news with their friends. 




photo by: Aimee Miceli 
TAKING A BREATHER. In between 
dance classes Freshmen Monica Anderson 
and Rachel Buchanan catch up on the new 
benches in front of Cline. "It's a great place to 
hang out because you can watch all the guys 
going in and out of the dorm," says Ander- 
son. 



HOT #Pf>T# 



best campus hangouts? 



"My favorite place 
has to be the new 
gazebo behind 
Mickle. It is very 
relaxing on a nice 
day." 
Christy Finch, 
Junior 




"Wherever there is 
a foosball table." 
Justin Beckham, 
Freshman 





"David 
M c C o r m i c k ' s 
room because he 
is the man." 
Allison Kana, 
Freshman 



'The TKE house." 

Charlie Starnes, 

Junior 




94 People 




] 4AAWMA> 



Rachel Alcorn 
Jasmin Alibalic 
Brittney Anderson 
Julia Bailey 
Alison Beck 



Adam Blancher 
Merrick Buchanan 
Jason Burnham 
Amy Calvert 
Jacqueline Carr 



Jay Carroll 
loshua Chambers 
Dan Davenport 
Nikki Doughty 
Sarah Everett 



Heidi Fahrenholtz 
Andrew Farrow 
Christy Finch 
Christopher Fontenot 
Jason Fowler 



Julie Greene 
Byron Grenda 
Melissa Guillory 
Whitney Hearnsberger 
Delanie Hebert 



Josh Ickes 
Christopher Jackson 
Tomieca Johnson 
Yvonne Juneau 
Pepper Kaufman 






Campus Hangouts 1 95 



BURNING 

UP WITH 
SPIRIT. De- 
spite the cold 
weather stu- 
dents crowded 
around the 
bonfire to get 
pumped up for 
the Homecom- 
ing festivities. 

ALONG 
FOR THE 
RiDE. Many 
organizations 
made indi- 
vidual floats for 
the Homecom- 
ing parade. 
The floats were 
supposed to be 
decorated 
around a 
theme and 
show school 
spirit. 




SHAKE IT! Jun- 
ior Dana Beyert 
shows her spirit 
and keeps warm at 
the Homecoming 
bonfire by shaking 
her stuff with 
Freshman Justin 
Kirkes. 



S. The cheerleaders ^ 

CD 

work to pump up the crowd and the basket- 3 

c 

B 

ball team by lifting squad members high into # 
the air to show how great their school spirit is. g 



RALLYING IN THE STANDS. Stu- 
dents, staff, alumni, and community support- 
ers gather together in the stands to cheer for 
the Gents. 












photo by: Sean Gilder 



photo by: Sean Gilder 




Top 5 

ways to show school spirit 

1. paint your body school colors 

2. make a banner 

3. show up at the event 

4. make T-shirts 

5. cheer very loudly in the stands 




Todd Killen 
Stacey Klingler 
Sarah King 
Christin Lawrence 
Amanda LeBlanc 








Elizabeth Lecky 
Chip LeDuff 
Sun-Hee Lee 
Travis Leger 
Laura Lindsay 




96 1 People 







e've ot Dirit 



students display school spirit all year long 

By: Nikki Doughty 



SCHOOL PRIDE. The Leading Ladies proudly display 
the banner they painted for the Homecoming basketball 
game. Banners are one of the most popular ways to 
showcase school spirit. 



photo by: Sean 

IRIT HI 

SELF. Who has more school 
spirit than the Centenary Gent 
himself? Dr. Schwab stands with 
his friend the Gent as they wave 
to students entering the fitness 
center. 




E ULTIMATE FANS. 
Zeta Tau Alpha members get to- 
gether with Tau Kappa Epsilon 
members to show thier school 
spirit and their support for their 
favorite player on the basketball 
team, Junior Brien Rabenhorst. 



Karen Loftin 
Michelle Long 
Tom Louis 
Shanah Martucci 
Marian Mayo 



Corey McMullin 
Christy Melton 
Linda Millhollon 
Mindy Montgomery 
Lisa Morse 



Sciiool Spirit | 93 






our tar ining? 




eating on campus 

By: Jennifer Hawkins 




photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 



WHEN ALL ELSE 
FAILS... orderpizza!!!Thatis 
just what Juniors Jackie Carr 
and Chris Fontenot did. Pizza 
is often resorted to by hungry 
college students here on cam- 
pus. "Sometimes you just need 
an alternative," says Carr. 



TAKING A BRE^ 



and 



running to the cafe. Junior Sean 
Gilder takes a breakfrom study- 
ing to run to late night to get 
something to eat. "I just had to 
have a break from the books," 
Gilder says. 



Amanda Mustin 
Ashley Palmer 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Emily Primeaux 
Brien Rabenhorst 



What is your favor- 
ite thing about eat' 
ing on campus? 




"BAGELS!!!!!!!!!" 
Harmony 
Williams, 
Freshman 




Jeanne Rasbery 
Julie Reisig 
Courtney Rhodes 
Tyler Robertson 
Amanda Rundell 



98 JPeopl( 



o 



YUM!! Freshmen Louise Smyth and Darkus 
Chism sit in the cafe at dinner and talk about 
their respective days. "The food is not always 
the best in the world, but I enjoy being able to 
talk with my pals," Smyth says of the cafe. 



NEVER TOO OLD FOR SMACKS. 
Junior Heidi Fahrenholtz proves one is never 
too old to enjoy sugar smacks and that it is 
never too late for cereal. Fahrenholtz says, "I 
love Honey Smacks; they are my favorite 
cereal!" 




,,-w 





fi- 


What do you think 


ll: 


about campus 
food? 


a 


"Word of advice: 


A a 


never upset the 


ffla 


people who cook 




your food." 




Jessica Haas,^fl 




Freshman A 



5: vfi! 




"It would have to 
be the cereal and 
the ice cream!" 
Ashley Palmer, 
Junior 



1. 



TOP 5 

reasons to eat on campus 

It is ALREADY PAID FOR!!! 



2. It's close to class for eating on the run. 

3. Bagels any time of the day. 

- Where else will you find half the 
*»■ people you know all in one place? 

5. Warm chocolate chip cookies. 




UMM UMM 
GOOD... 
Sophomore Pam 
Gruettner takes a 
moment to have a 
cup of soup. She 
avoided the cafe 
for a reason: "The 
cafe closes early 
so I just have to 
make do," she 
says. 







Bryan Scanlon 
Stacy Shelton 
Doug Smith 
Rebekah Snider 
Charlie Starnes 





Amanda Taylor 
Melissa Thomas 
Lesley Thull 
Scott Vanderlick 
Sarah Williams 




Campus Eating |99 




Garrett Allen 
Paul Aucoin 
Robert Beaird 
Beth Beck 
Mime Bqyter 



Jameelah Brown 
Lauren Bryan 
Doug Bryson 
Kevin Cassidy 
Marcie Cloud 



Katie Cooper 
Rachael Day 

Natasha DelCastillo 
Dan Duzan 
Joshua Fisher 



Helen Fraser 
Claire Galloway 
Lisa Game 
Crystal Gant 
Krystil Garrett 



Danielle Gayer 
Suzie Golas 
Jessica Haley 
lohathan Hammett 
Laurie Heinrich 



Liz Holland 
Kristy Jackson 
Jeffrey Jacobie 
Jay Jamison 
David Jones 



10Q |Peopl< 





photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 
FUTURE ROOMMATES! Freshmen 
Jessica Haas and Julie Watkins just can't 
wait to share a room! They show that they 
don't mind being close for the camera. "My 
little care bear is a booger picker, but I guess 
I can live with it," says Watkins. 



hat's the best thing about it? 



"It never gets 
lonely; there is al- 
ways someone 
there to listen to 
you." 

Pam Gruettner, 
Freshman 





"There is always 
someone there to 
remind you to do 
stuff." 
Krystil Garrett, 
Sophomore 



"He drives 
home!" 
Casey Muller 
Freshman 



me 





"There is always 

someone to hit you 

with a pillow if you 

start to snore." 

DeAndre 

Johnson, 

Freshman 






earning 




roommates: the good, the bad, the ugly 



By: Jennifer Hawkins 



ROOMMATE 
BONDING. 
Freshmen Jennifer 
Hamblin and Katie 
Fullbright take a 
break on their way 
back from lunch. 
Hamblin says, "It is 
great having a 
roommate who is 
tall because I never 
need a ladder!" 




pnoto by. 



photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 

ALL WORK AND NO PLAY. Juniors Amanda 
Taylor and Margaret Read take a break from goof- 
ing off in theirdorm room. "She is great; I am glad we 
got to be roommates," says Taylor. 

ALMOST NAPTJME! Freshman Teresa Gillilan 
sits on her bed with her roommate, Cristina 
Guadalupe, and their stuffed animals. They try to 
spend as much time together as possible before 
Cristina transfers away. "She is awesome and is 
one of the few that really understands the 'Cristina 
Dictionary.' I will really miss her!" 




photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 

THOSE WHO LIVE TO- 
GETHER EAT TO- 
GETHER Freshman Heather 
Day scoops ice cream at late night 
with her roommate, Sophomore 
Christina Taylor. "She is awesome 
and a neat freak; I love her!" Day 
says of Taylor. 



photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 

OUTSIDE OF THE ROOM. 
Senior Tranisha Hunter tells the 
differences between having a 
roommate and not. "There are 
good and bad points to both, but it 
is nice having privacy," she says. 



photo by: Jennifer Hawkins 

PLAYING AROUND. Fresh- 
men Allison Kana and Jennifer 
Maynard show that roommates 
can be close friends. "My room- 
mate and I are living proof that 
that the two sororities can live 
together in harmony," says 
Maynard. 



Roommates 



101 




4fe 


How do you feel 


II ■ 


about the fact that 


V- 


there are more 




girls than boys at 




the school? 


Ji- 


"Perfect for my 


ll. 


tastes!" 




Marc Gewin, 




Sophomore 



GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS! Junior Charlie 
Starnes is happy about being outnumbered 
by girls as he talks with Junior Heidi 
Fahrenholtz in front of Sexton. "God bless us 
everyone!" he says. 

Girls can be found 
just about everywhere on campus. These 
students fend a few hours working on papers 
and surfing the web in the library. 



o 

■c . 




X 



A 



How are you af- 
fected by the boy/ 
girl ratio? 

"It makes the 
campus a bit 
more aestheti- 
cally pleasing." 
Paul Masterson 





SWING YOUR 
PARTNER (IF 
YOU CAN 
FIND ONE)! 
Sophomore Marc 
Gewin doesn't 
mind being sur- 
rounded by girls at 
a dance. Due to 
there being more 
girls than guys, 
there are not 
enough guys for 
every girl to dance 
with. Freshman 
Susan King asks 
"Where have all 
the cowboys 
gone?" 



Virginia (ones 
Ryan Kraemer 
Brandon Larson 
Brandon Lawson 
Robyn Marchand 



Nathan McAbee 
Katie Meinen 
Henry Mejia 
Rebecca Melanson 
Susanna Miller 






TOP 


5 




places for girls to meet guys. 


1. 


the cafe 




2. 


fraternity houses 




3. 


game room in the SUB 


4. 


sporting events 




5. 


classes 










V 



'.';■..* v. :":■; '*:, 




102 | People 




Girls:2. 




girls outnumber boys in enrollment 

By: Mindy Montgomery 



What do you 



boy/girl ratio? 




"I want more girls 

and better 

choices." 

David 

McCormick, 

Senior 



"I've been at Cen- 






tenary so long 1 

expect it to be that 

way." 

Montie Thomas, 


V- 1 ' 


'"*■ 


Junior 


1 






"It's fun and opti- 
mal for the guys. I 
think anywhere 
you go there will 
be more girls than 
guys. Works out 
perfect!" 
Nick Antoon, 
Freshman 




photo by: Mindy Montogomery 





STUDLY RELATIONS. 
Freshman Michael Lindahl re- 
laxes in the SUB while being 
surrounded by women, includ- 
ing Sophomore Heidi 
Fahrenholtz. Fahrenholtz is not 
quite as impressed with the boy/ 
girl ratio as some of the guys. 
"Not so sweet," she says. 

APPEARANCES CAN 
EIVING. Junior 
Corey McMullin hangs out with 
Junior Crystal Carter in the SUB. 
He says of the boy/girl ratio, 
"On paper the percentage ap- 
pealed to me, but then I real- 
ized I still have no chance." 



Melanie Moeck 
Elizabeth Mull 
Valerie Olson 
Aimee Patrick 
Wendy Paul 



Benjamin Pierce 
Allison Prestridge 
Melanie Rawle 
Zachary Sa[yer 
Meredith Sanders 



Girl/Boy Ratio 1 103 



c 



vervfaodv 




Kt-I 



hem 



breaks throughout the year 

By: Aimee Miceli 




THROW ME SOME- 
" : Freshmen 
Jennifer Hamblin, Jennifer 
Hawkins, and Katie Fullbright 
show off their creative signs 
during a Mardi Gras parade. 
"Signs are a great way to catch 
beads if you don't want to flash," 
says Hawkins. 



HAWAIIAN HANGOUT. 
Junior Sarah Knighton spent 
some of her summer break on 
the Hawaii module. The group 
participated in many events, 
including volcano visits and a 
luau. 



picture courtesy of: Jennifer Hawkins 




m^ 






|PI% **-'* 








iiP^fe 


.' 


., 


Pi W>' 


QBHS|*S^ii *^HjH 


w 


*'5yjr 


IB 1 




*f : 


E#^ 


k %, 




■ 5s *««t ^sk 




1 - J^ ' 


L* 


r 




A 


■""■■■■■■ 





What has been 

your favorite 

break? 




"My best break 
was Mardi Gras 
because my best 
friend came to visit 
and went to New 
Orleans." 
Michael Lindahl, 
Freshman 



"My summer vaca- 
tion because I 
went to the Cay- 
man Islands." 
Katie White, 
Junior 





"My best break 
was definitely 
Mardi Gras be- 
cause I got to go to 
New Orleans and 
party." 
Nate Lucena, 
Sophomore 





Randi Smith 
Lauren Stallings 
Katica Stojanova 
(essie Strout 
Amy Sturdivant 



Neha Surie 
Stasia Taylor 
Victoria Tidmore 
Amy Waguespack 
Monweh Weeks 




104- 1 People 



§- AHH! IT'S THE BIRDS! Freshman 
o 

° Casey Muller feeds the seagulls at Biloxi 

q beach over Spring Break. "It was a lot of fun 

a 

^ feeding the birds, except one thing; I think 

|f you can figure it out," says Muller. 



CHRISTMAS CHEER. Sophomore Jes- 
sica Haley and Freshman Saba Khonsari 
enjoy a pre-Christmas party at the Kappa 
Sigma house. "I enjoyed being the Kappa 
Sigma/Chi-Omega elf," says Khonsari. 



A 




What has been 
your best break 
memory? 

"Getting stranded 
in the French 
Quarter after a 
parade and being 
assisted by some 
overly friendly 
Texans." 
Jennifer 
Maynard, 
Freshman 




What has been 
your best break 
memory? 

"Over Spring 
Break I went to 
Waco to visit fam- 
ily and spent the 
day at a horse 
ranch. We did an 
Easter egg hunt 
for some kids and 
it was a lot of fun." 
Rachael Day, 
Sophomore 



TOP 5 



break locations 

1. New Orleans to party for Mardi Gras 

2. Anywhere that is not Centenary 
3_ Denmark 

4. The beach to catch some rays 

5. Home for a soft bed and good food 





BATHING 
BEAUTIES. 
Sophomore Krystil 
Garrett, Juniors 
Aimee Miceli and 
Mindy Montgom- 
ery, and Fresh- 
men Jennifer 
Maynard and 
Ashlie Daigle 
strike a pose and 
catch some rays 
over spring break. 
"Other than my 
sunburn it was a 
lot of fun," says 
Garrett. 



Michael Wilson 
Walter Wooldridge 



Breaks 105 



hey're 




onev 



student workers earn money with on-campus jobs 

By: Mary Meriam 



HARD 
WORKER. 
Sophomore Joy 
Banks gets in a little 
homework while 
she works in the fit- 
ness center. Some- 
times student work- 
ers get to study for 
a test or other 
project when things 
are slow at work. 





photo by: Mary Meriam 

SWITCHBOARD SAVVY. Junior Matthew 
Philbrook works the switchboard during his job at 
the SUB information desk. 

LIBRARY LADY. Junior Randi Smith works on 
the computer for her student worker job in the 
library. "I love working in the library," she says. "I get 
to talk to people and it's not stressful." 









photo by: Ashley Knecht 


*** 


■*«■ 


■ 


-^ 


1 1 j 

' M 1 

■ 


7 












■ 


'M ^*Jh^W 


..,., ^^B Kii'ih^ 








photo by: Mary Meriam 



DO-^^^oikiiiftampus? 



Working in the bookstore is a 
good way to earn money and stil 
be involved in school life." 

Allison Kana, 
Freshman 



"My job at the Information Desk 
would be perfect if they let me play 
pool." 

Caleb Ashley, 
Sophomore 



"I like working in the Student Life 
office. I wouldn't want to work any- 
where else." 

Aimee Miceli, 
Junior 




photo by: Mary Meriam 
OFFICIAL BUSINESS. Junior Nikki 
Doughty carries some supplies to Mickle 
Hall for an upcoming board meeting. "I have 
fun working in Hamilton Hall. I get to work for 
a lot of different people so I usually stay 
pretty busy," says Doughty. 

WRIT rw*v 



what's your opinion? 



"I enjoy it as much 
as I can." 
Jazz Alibalic, 
Senior 




"Answering the 

switchboard is 

great because I get 

to talk to a lot of 

interesting people 

and work closely 

with the Student 

Life staff." 

Matthew 

Philbrook, 

Junior 





"I'm headed for 
medical or engi- 
neering school, so 
I'm enjoying this 
job while it lasts." 
Kristy Jackson, 
Sophomore 



"Working in the 
SUB is alright. I like 
getting to visit with 
all the people that 
pass through." 
Christy Melton, 
Junior 




106 People 





Andrew Barkley 
lennifer Bato 
Barbra Bearden 
Sherilyn Bossier 
Nicole Boudreaux 



Justin Breitschopf 
leffery Broussard 
Tony Cardone 
Artis Cash 
Amanda Couch 



Vanessa Curtis 
Ashlie Daigle 
Cheyenne Daries 
Lauren Davis 
Heather Day 



Maura Dees 
Reese Duty 
Brandee Dykes 
Sarah Earhart 
Davon Ferrara 



Sherricka Fields 
Mitchell Glass 
Lavashia Graham 
Elliott Grand 
lessica Haas 



Michael Hall 
Jennifer Hamblin 
Stephen Hampton 
Jennifer Hawkins 
Talia Hebert 

Student Workers 1 107 



—— 






I 




a 



o 

A: 



What's the worst 
thing about dorm 
life? 

"When the comput- 
ers in the library 
decide to freeze 
when you're work- 
ing on a paper at 
four in the morn- 
ing." 

Wendy Paul, 
Sophomore 




What's the best 
thing about dorm 
life? 



"Other people 
clean your bath- 
room for you." 
Christina 
Taylor, 
Sophomore 



CREATE A PRODUCTIVE 
ENVIRONMENT.Sophomore Lisa Game 
works on a peper in the decor of her dorm § 
room. Blue carpets and fabrics and white * 
lights draping from the ceiling create a peace- ^ 
ful and relaxing atmosphere. 



LOBBYISTS 

and Ashly Neal chill out in the James Hall 
lobby before class begins. The lobbies of 
dorms are very important to dorm life. They 
serve as a social place, a place to relax, or as 
a place to hold meetings. 





FREE SPIRIT, 
Sophomore 
Susanna Miller 
keeps her dorm 
room filled with 
bright colors, such 
as tie-dyed pil- 
lows, posters, and 
art. Pictures of 
friends cover her 
wall by her bed. 
Pictures are a 
popular feature in 
dorm rooms. 



Shelley Horton 
Kate Howell 
Zachary Ingrim 
lamie Jahnke 
Tricia Jett 



Laurie Kamberi 
Allison Kana 
Saba Khonsari 
Justin Kirkes 
April Landry 




TOP 5 

things to do to your dorm room. 

1. keep it clean 

2. drape a curtain around your bunk beds 

3. hang Christmas lights or beads 

4. put up posters/pictures 
5_ put down carpet 





106 1 People 




HomeSweet ome? 



students make the most of dorm life 

By: Michelle Magee 






"At midnight every 
night my 

wallmates make 
scary animal 
noises." 

Amy 

Waguespack, 

Sophomore 



"I was a lying on 
the bathroom floor 
laughing once, 
and Brandon 
Wollerson jumped 
on top of me and 
started heaving." 
Susanna Miller, 
Sophomore 





"Living with Aine 
[from Ireland] was 
cool because we 
got to learn a lot 
about our different 
cultures." 
Delanie Hebert, 
Junior 






photo by: Michelle Magee 
PIGPEN. Junior Heather 
Lindsey and Sophomore Randi 
Smith need to find a place to sit 
in this nameless person's dorm 
room! Many students stay so 
busy they just don't have 
enough time to keep their rooms 
clean. 

ROCKING AWAY. Junior 
Erin Barr sits on the front porch 
of Hardin Hall for a little reading 
and relaxation. The front 
porches of the dorms are popu- 
lar places to hang out and study, 
visit with friends, or just enjoy 
the day. 



Aimee Lange 
Todd Lelck 
Drew Ley 
April Louwien 
Jennifer Maynard 



Patrick McCuller 
Valerie McDonald 
loshua Melson 
Maria Moores 
Ashly Neal 



Dorm Rooms 1 1Q9 



fyn&MimeM, 



Kristen Paxson 
Alexis Pettway 
John Rabenhorst 
Peter Raish 
Cassandra Ratcliff 



Mia Reamer 
Rachel Reischling 
Joseph Robideaux 
Gina Sarullo 
Charity Schubert 



Esther Seitz 
Traci Smith 
Monica Smothers 
Sarah Stringer 
Amy Sullivan 



Cristina Taylor 
Kathryn Thompson 
Ryan Walsh 
Julie Watkins 
Jennifer Watson 



Yolanda Welch 
Brian White 
Nina Wiley 




no lPeople 




Dr. Kenneth L Schwab 
President of the College 



Faculty/Staff |m 



Executive Assistants 
to the President 

Lori McCarty 
Amy Petrus 





Alumni/Development 



Katherine Fell, Traci Alsup, Catherine Fraser, Pat Gallion, David Hennington, Carolyn Hitt, Kim Hobbs, Mimi McDowell, Diane 

Michels, Patty Roberts, Gisela Amidon, Claire Woodall 



u npeople 




College Relations 

Dr. Gene Gregory 

Carol Bender 

Amy Davis 

Amy Ricke 




Admissions 

Timothy Crowley, Paul Belcher, Lewis Bell, Anne-Marie Bruner, Michelle Faith, Janet Ingram, Susan Moore, Deborah Scarlato, 



Faculty/Staff |ii3 



Financial Aid 

Mary Sue Rix 
Lynette Viskozki 





Public Relations 

Lynn Stewart, Donna Bartholomew, Peggy Cooper 



114- IPeople 





Library & Information Technology Staff 

Library: Elizabeth Ackerman, Marcia M. Alexander, Roger Becker, Sofia Bennett, Ronald Bukoff, Sharon Chevalier, Judith Grunes, 

Eric Grunes, Kyle Labor, Nancy E. Middleton, Christy J. Wrenn 
Information Technology: Roger Becker, J. Scott Merritt, Harley Campbell, Chris Derrick, Glenn Mcintosh, Jason Murray, Linda Muse, 

Kathe C. Newsome, Lee Parker, John "Rick" Phillips 




Faculty/Staff |ll5 



Career Center 

Therese Lambert 

(not pictured: 

Grace Bareikis, 

Dian Tooke) 





Registrar's Office 

David Williams, Dorothy Liesman, Golda Young, Gary R. Young 



llG lPeople 




Vice President of Finance 

Fred Scott 



Faculty/Staff \m 




Business Office 

Susan Chapman 

Debbie Hayes 

Nikki Holmes 

Monica Powell 

Sonja Smith 

Jean Trahan 

Martha Wilt 





Post Office 

Carol Bateman, Patsy Brumley 



ll8 |People 



■ 










Art Department 

Bruce Allen 
Neil Johnson 
Lisa Nicoletti 




Frost School of Business 

Barbara Davis, Harold Christensen, David Hoaas, Betsy Rankin, Barry Richardson, Don Wilcox 



Faculty/Staff 119 




Chemistry Department 

Ernest W. Blakeney, Jr., Ron Martin, Rosemary Seidler, Thomas M. Ticich 



l20 |People 




Education 
Department 

Naomi Coyle 

Sue Hernandez 

John Turner 

Ilka Vaitkus 








Foreign Language Department 

Robert P. Bareikis, J. Stephen Clark, Mark M. Gruettner, Dana Kress, Maureen McKenna 



Faculty/Staff |121 




Geology Department 

Mary Barrett, Scott Vetter, David Bieler 



122 |People 



History/Political Science 

History: Jodi Campbell, Samuel Shepherd 
Political Science: Rodney Grunes, Dirk C. van Raemdonck 





Faculty/Staff \m 





Math Department 



J. Derrick Head, Alfred L. McKinney, Mark D. Schlatter, David E. Thomas 



l24 |People 







- — 






Director of 
Music Library 



Ron Bukoff 




Hurley School of Music 



Will K. Andress, Ronald N. Bukoff, Laura Crawford, Ronald E. Dean, Horace C. English, Gay Grosz, Sally Horak, Thomas Hundemer, Eric L. 
Mclntyre, Gale J. Odom, Joy F. Ratcliff, Ross E. Smith, Thomas Stone, Chandler Teague, Julia B. Thorn, Theresa Zale-Bridges, 

Mark Zeltser 



Faculty/Staff |125 





Physics Department 

Jerry E. Lisantti, Juan R. G. Rodriguez, Jeffrey F. Trahan 



l26 |People 




Sociology 
Department 

Loren Demerath 
Michelle J. Wolkomir 




Theatre/Speech 



Robert R. Buseick, Ginger D. Folmer, Don Hooper, Nathan Thomas 



Faculty/Staff | ia 



THE SKY'S THE 
LIMIT senior Femi 
Odukoya makes a fly- 
ing leap in an effort to 
score against Texas 
Pan-American. 
Odukoya says, "Femi 
Odukoya, always 
reaching for his goals, 
no matter how high 
they are!" 



128 ISports 




|P HpF W$F 







knows about-^ teamwork 

By: Nikki Doughty 
Teamwork and friendships were a common theme 
among athletes, and no matter what the scoreboard 
said they all knew they came together as a team to put 
up a good fight against their opponents. The Ladies' 
Soccer team enjoyed the sweet smell of victory with a 
15-4 record, and Senior Lara Brown kicked her way to 
a ranking of number one in points and goals per game. 
The Baseball team enjoyed their new locker room and 
the new Shehee stadium, and some students felt a 
twinge of jealousy when they, along with the Ladies' 
Softball team, got to play in a tournament in Hawaii. 
With the Leading Ladies and the Cheerleaders yelling 
their support, the Gents' Basketball team pulled out 
eight wins, but not even the leaks in the Gold Dome 
could stop Senior Ronnie McCollum from emerging as 
the leading scorer in the nation. The Ladies' Basket- 
ball worked hard to improve their skills, and with their 
strong team spirit and new coach David Winkler they 
look forward to a winning season next year. The 
Volleyball team earned their 1 1 wins with lots of prac- 
tice and a strong emphasis on teamwork. Although 
some teams enjoyed more victory than others, each 
member contributed to his or her team a unique talent 
and a heartfelt effort that her or she can always be proud 
of. 




Divider 1 129 



MJJ -ii 

ai h 
1 I 11 

boys' soccer pulls through tough season 

By: Michelle Magee 



r Juggling the ball 
on the sidelines is a popular way to stay 
warmed up for a game. Players always 
have to be ready to go into a game at a 
moment's notice. 



Looking Back 
On The Season. 




"I thought we had 
a tough year and 
could have 
played a little bet- 
ter. I love the 
team and will 
miss them next 
year." 

Monweh 

Weeks, 

Sophomore 




"Last year on the 
road we got beat 
really bad by this 
one particular 
team. This year 
we played them 
at home and won 
big time! It was a 
great feeling!" 
Zach Salyer, 
Sophomore 





^P «■* 



photo courtesy of: Public Relations 

SIDELINE SUPPORT. Some of the guys cheer for their 
teammates as they play on the field. The soccer team supports 
each other on and off the field; this helps to boost the team 
morale. 



photo courtesy of: Sports Informatio. 

2000-2001 GENTS SOCCER TEAM. Head Coach Jed Jones, Assistant Coach David On 
Graduate Assistant Marc Castillo. Jeremiah Brown, G.B. Cazes, Josh Chambers, Justin Clark, Jeff Diskc 
Jason Fowler, Carlos Isaac, Preston Ivey, Charles Ivory, Ryan Janbaz, Travis Leger, John Lee, Michae 
Lehmann, Eric Mayo, Nathan McAbee, Michael McGuire, Tomas Melchor, Adam Mueller, Kaisser Najjai 
Ryan Nugent, Garret Pickard, Wesley Rawlings, Richard Rousseau, Zack Salyer, Chris Smith, J.C 
Stewart, Noah Ward, Monweh Weeks, Jason Williams. 



BO lSports 




MAXIMUM VELOCITY. Ball control proves to be no 
problem for Junior G.B. Cazes. He flies down the field past 
his opponents in an attempt to score a goal. Cazes individual 
record this season includes three goals and five assists. 

HEAD GAMES. Soccer players must be quick on their 
feet as well as with their heads. Freshman Preston Ivey 
practices on the sidelines with Sophomore Charles Ivory. 
Ivey added one goal and two assists to his record this 
season. 







hoto courtesy of: Public Relations 



Water Break 

photo by: Lifetouch 

Sophomore Nathan McAbee, 
who plays forward and wears 
#7, had a successful season on 
the field with a lot of activity 
around the goal. He racked up 
ninegoalsfortheteamandhad 
three assists, leading the team in number of 
points and number of goals. McAbee came to 
Centenary from Paso Robles, California where he 
also played high school soccer. 




Words of Wisdom 

teammates build team morale 

'The team works well together and really plays 
as a group." 

Junior Ryan Nugent 



"We have a lot of fun together. We even have 
a 'special' warm-up routine." 

Sophomore Zacfe Salyer 



"Games can become really intense at times. 
We all try to remain calm." 

Sophomore Justin Clark 



Gents Soccer 



home games 


in bold 


Georgia Southern 


L3-2 


The Citadel 


W5-0 


TCU 


LO-2 


Oral Roberts 


LO-1 


Missouri-Kansas 


L3-7 


City 




Western Illinois 


LO-3 


lona 


W3-2 



UC-Santa Barbara L 0-2 



UC-lrvine 



Drury 



LO-3 



L3-6 



Oral Roberts 


W2-1 


Oklahoma City 


L0-4 


Central Florida 


LO-4 


Florida Atlantic 


L 1-3 


Louisiana College 


W5-1 


Alabama A&M 


L2-6 



Record: 4-12 




Ti 










3- 










O 






.UliUPII 




O 

o 


• 








r? 


\ 1 




; " «4% 




O 

r-s 


\ \ 








C 


; \ ' 






a- 








* 


o' 


^^ 






%_■ 


30 








«: 










» . 


a 








Z 


o 










3 


•<■:>-. ■ ..■-. ' ~i* : - y 


aJsT 

















photo by: Sean Gilder 
ALUMNI ACTION. Junior Ryan 
Nugent waits in hopes of stealing the ball 
from his opponent during the Alumni 
Game. The game is always a popular 
event during the Alumni Weekend fes- 
tivities. 

CROWD PLEASERS. Fans sitting 
in the stands cheer for the guys as they 
run on the field to begin the match. The 
guys appreicate the fans who come to 
root for them in their games. 



Gents Soccer 131 



home games in bold 
North Texas L 0-3 

Southeastern La. W 2-1 
Northwestern State W 2-0 
Texas Christian L 1-2 

Mississippi State W 2-1 
Tennessee-Martin W 8-1 
Northwestern State W 4-2 
Louisiana-Monroe L 1-2 
■ McNeese State W 5-1 

Drury W 2-1 

Arkansas-Little Rock W 2-1 

W2-1 



Birmingham- 
Southern 

McNeese State W 5-1 



Stephen F. Austin W 1-0 

Oklahoma City L 1-3 

Louisiana-Lafayette W 2-1 

Arkansas State W 1-0 

Louisiana College W 13-0 

Alabama A&M W 5-0 



Record: 15-4 



Lucky 
Charms 



"I have a lucky sports bra and 
underwear that I wear for re- 
ally big games. I have had the 
same lucky pair since I was a 
junior in high school, and we 
got third place in the state 
tournament. They still seemto 
bring good luck." 

Maria Moores, 
Freshman 

I have to listen to the 'Do you 

smell what the Rock is cookin'?' 

song in the locker room." 

Brandy Gunderson, 

Senior 




photo courtesy of: Public Relations 
1 ,2,3 WIN!! Team spirit and unity helped lead the girls to 
their winning record this season. The ladies huddle together 
before a game to get pumped up and show their spirit. 

OUT OF THE WAY! Freshman Sarah Brown plays 
aggressively on the field with a player from Alabama A&M. 
Brown's aggression on the field helped her rack up five goals 
and five assists this season. 



132 Sports 



GUARDING IT WITH HER LIFE. Sophomore goal- 
keeper Heather Lindsey blocks a goal during a game. Lindsey 
stayed quick on her toes this season, blocking a total of 86 
goals. 

STAYING FOCUSED. Senior player Jenelle Cockerham 
takes a minute in the game to gather her thoughts. Cockerham 
added one assist to her record this season. 



S mi 

_k-l-| -0 



u 



jags ^S& 

l-I-I 




ladies' soccer enjoys successful season 

By: Jennifer Hawkins 



Water Break 

photo courtesy of: Public Relations 

Lara Brown's performance on 
the field gained her the rank- 
ing of number one in points 
per game and goals per game. 
"This year I think our team 
really became one on the field, 
and that was a great part of our 
success. All the hard training sessions we went 
through together helped us become closer on 
and off the field and led to great team chemistry. 
This year has been a great one and a great way to 
end my soccer career at Centenary," said Brown. 





photo courtesy of: Sports Information 
2000-2001 LADIES' SOCCER TEAM. Head Coach Jed Jones, Assistant Coaches 
Michael Comeau and Glenn Evans, Graduate Assistant Coach Jaime Frias. Lyndsay Bigler, 
Katie Bowman, Lara Brown, Sarah Brown, Jenelle Cockerham, Kathryn Cooper, Dawn Crider, 
Sarah Dewitt, Brandy Gunderson, Nancy Hoskins, Stacey Klingler, Heather Lindsey, Maria 
Moores, Ashley Palmer, Shannon Richardson, Valerie Sandoval, Ledah Smith, Rebekah Snider, 
Catherine Spruce, Lacey Stewart, Melissa Tharp, Lauren Williams. 



KEEPING IT 
ALLUNDER 
CONTROL. 
Freshman For- 
ward Lindsay 
Bigler dribbles 
the ball down 
the field so she 
can go for the 
goal. Maintain- 
ing ball control 
is an important 
skill to have out 
on the field. 
Bigler has the 
skill down, for 
she scored nine 
goals and two 
assists this 
season. 



^WT±s*t 


"V^^Sf ttl^ l3^St 


^>«*,jrt ojff yom* 


SSOSElJSOJn? 


"...We had the 


"The best part of 


"...Our win over 


best record in the 


the season was to 


SFA. We played 


history of Cente- 
nary, and that was 
an achievement 
we will never for- 


play with all of my 
best friends and 
have a great win- 


in their stadium, 
and they had the 
most obnoxious 
fans. We were 


get. It was a great 


ning record of 15- 


tied.. .the entire 


season to end my 


4." 


game until 


college career." 


Dawn Crider, 


the[end]whenwe 


Katie Bowman, 


Senior 


scored a goal to 


Senior 




give us... victory.'' 

Ashley Palmer, 

Junior 



L adies' Soccer! 133 



home games in bold 




Troy State 


LO-3 


Tulane 


LO-3 


Northwestern State 


LO-3 


Louisiana Tech 


LO-3 


Jackson State 


W3-1 


Tennessee Tech 


LO-3 


Mississippi State 


LO-3 


Louisiana-Monroe 


L2-3 


Southern Arkansas 


LO-3 


Grambling State 


W3-0 


Louisiana Tech 


LO-3 


North Texas 


LO-3 


Tulsa 


LO-3 


Grambling State 


L 1-3 


Prarie View A&M 


LO-3 


Arkansas Pine-Bluff 


W3-0 


Alcorn State 


L 1-3 


Southern Arkansas 


W3-0 


Southern University w 3-2 


SE Louisiana 


LO-3 


Jackson State 


W3-0 


Alcorn State 


W3-2 


Prarie View A&M 


W3-2 


Lamar 


LO-3 


Alcorn State 


L 1-3 


Prarie View A&M 


LO-3 


Texas Southern 


L 1-3 


New Orleans 


LO-3 


TexasA&M-Commerce L 0-3 


Texas Southern 


W3-1 


Belmont 


L3-1 


Lipscomb 


W3-0 


Texas-Pan Am 


LO-3 


Birmingham Southern 


W3-1 


Northwestern State 


LO-3 


St. Mary's University 


LO-3 


Texas Pan-American 


LO-3 



Record: 11-26 




MAKING A CONTRIBUTION. Sophomore Karen fc 

Asplin hopes for a point as she gracefully tips the ball over the o 

c 
net. "She was a great asset to the team, and we'll miss her S 



a lot next year," recalls Sophomore Allison Prestridge. 

) UP' The team gets ready to cheer before a big 
match. They work together to keep each other pumped up 
during the games because they find it helps them perform 
better. 




Water Break 

photo courtesy of: Sports Information 



A 



Holly Tarter began her first 
season as head coach of the 
volleyball team. She coached 
at various colleges and high 
schools before making her way 
to Centenary. She was recog- 
nized for her skills while playing for Sul Ross State 
University in Alpine,Texas, including being 
named to the All-TIAA team in 1989 and 1990 
and being named best all-around player. 



photo by: Sean Gilder 

A LITTLE PRACTICE GOES A 
LONG WAY All the long practices 
pay off for the team when game day 
arrives. Freshman Brandi Patterson 
waits to see if the ball is returned. 

LEND A HELPING HAND. Sopho- 
more Allison Prestridge shows she knows 
the value of teamwork as she passes the 
ball to her teammates. The girls work 
together during matches by talking to 
one another. 






Words of Wisdom 

teammates work together to stay fired up 

"We really try to help each other in a game 
situation. We talk to each other a lot." 

Sophomore Allison Prestridge 



"We really practice hard. Three-a-days almost 
killed me!" 

Freshman Casey Varnado 



"I like to get the team really fired up before a big 
game. I think it helps us play better." 



134 1 Sports 





voUeybaH team embraces teamwork, newcoach 

By: Michelle Magee 



The Best Thing 
About The Season... 




"...The team really 

pulled 

together. The 

bonds that were 

formed allowed us 

to become closer 

and play better." 

Allison 

Prestridge, 

Sophomore 



GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND. 
Freshmen Lavashia Graham and Brandi 
Patterson jump high in hopes of blocking 
the spike. Graham comments, "Some- 
times I get really nervous, like when guys 
in the stands start calling out my num- 
ber." 



"We weren't only 
friends on the 
court, but on cam- 
pus as well. Most 
of us had some 
fun times goofing 
off together." 
Lavashia 
Graham, 
Freshman 




"After playing high 
school volleyball I 
didn't quite know 
what to expect. 
The girls were re- 
ally great. They 
made me feel like 
part of a family." 
Casey Varnado, 
Freshman 





photo courtesy of: Allison Prestridge 

000-2001 VOLLEYBALL TEAM. Head Coach Holly Tarter. Karin Asplin, 
manda Couch, Nikki Dawson, Lavashia Graham, Krissi McFarland, Brandi 
atterson, Joci Petten, Allison Prestridge, Jessica Tennison, Casey Varnado. 



photo courtesy of : Allison Prestridge 

RELAXING IN STYLE. Coach Tarter relaxes in a borrowed Porsche while the 
team takes a break. "We all get along really well," comments Freshman Casey 
Varnado. "It's nice to just be able to hang out and take a break from serious 
competition." 



Volleyball 1 135 




s e t 
o-e 



STAND BACK! Sophomore Kresimir Tomorad fiercely 
guards a Louisiana Tech player on the court so that he cannot 
interfere with an opportunity for the Gents to score. 

QUICK ON THE FEET. Junior Kevin Atamah uses his 
speedy dribbling skills to sneak the ball around a Louisiana Tech 
player that guards him closely. 



gents win on familiar territory 

By: Nikki Doughty 



AIMING 
RIGHT AT 
THE TOP. 
Senior Ronnie 
M c C o I I u m 
shoots for the 
goal in a game 
against Louisi- 
ana Tech. 
McCollum re- 
ceived national 
recognition for 
his outstanding 
success this 
season; he 
became the 
nation's No. 1 
leading scorer 
with 29.1 points 
per game. 

SINK IT IN. 
Sophomore 
Kresimir 
Tomorad, who 
comes to Cen- 
tenary from 
Z a p r e s i c , 
Croatia, makes 
a shot for the 
goal while a 
Louisiana Tech 
player looks on. 

136lSports 



c # • 

jljmi 



# • • • • 9 





Water Break 

photo by: Lifetouch 

Senior Ronnie McCollum, who 
wears #32 for the Gents, had a 
very successful season gained 
him lots of recognition. After 
scoring an average of 29.1 
points per game, he received national recogni- 
tion by being named the nation's No. 1 leading 
scorer in NCAA Division 1. 














photo courtesy of: Sports Information 

Head Coach Kevin Johnson; Assistar 

Coaches Arturo Ormond, Randy Lee, Joey Tolis. Kevin Atamah, Eldarkus Chism, Reese Duty 

Michael Gale, Warren Harris, DeMario Hooper, Miroslav llic, Ronnie McCollum, Oluferr 

Odukoya, Brien Rabenhorst, Idrion Reed, KresimirTomorad, Shohn Williams, Andrew Wisniewsk 









East Texas Baptist 
| Southwest TX St. 

| Tennessee-Martin 
§ University of Arkansas 
Marquette University 
Kent State University 
Tulane University 
Southern University 
LA Tech University 
University of Iowa 
Univ. of Minnesota 
Tennessee-Martin 
Texas A&M 
Mary Hardin-Baylor 
TX A&M-Corpus Christi 
Louisiana State Univ. 
LA Tech University 

Belmont University 
TX A&M-Corpus 
Christi 

Belmont University 

Lipscomb University 

Lipscomb University 

Arkansas Baptist 

UAB 

Texas-Pan American 

Northwestern State 

Texas-Pan American 



W93-56 

W70-63 

L56-69 

L57-88 

L47-66 

L47-61 

L57-68 

L54-59 
L58-64 
L52-72 

L59-93 
W78-66 
L67-77 
W94-82 

L85-90 
L44-85 

W74-63 
W85-80 

W82-80 

L73-76 

L71-91 

L72-84 

W1 12-77 

L62-97 

L66-68 

L78-80 

L61-81 



Record: 8-19 





photo courtesy of: Sports Information 
TAKING A REST. Juniors Brien Rabenhorst and Warren 
Harris sit on the bench with Sophomore Kresimir Tomorad and 
show their support for their teammates on the court. 

LAY IT UP THERE. Freshman Michael Gale gets high off 
the court as he throws one past a Louisiana Tech player for a 
goal. 




WHAT?!?!?! Freshman Eldarkus 
Chism shows his reaction to a call made 
by the referees during a game. 



Gents BasfetM 1 137 



JLijU_ a 

■ 

-f-M-l-l 

young girls' team builds on teamwork 

By: Nikki Doughty 



WHO'S ( Freshman Julie REACHING OUT. Freshman Katie 

Daniels hangs onto the ball as she Nicol reaches out to the side to catch the 

searches the court for an open player to ball and get it safely in her hands so that 

pass the ball to. she can head fo the goal and score. 







photo courtesy of: Sports Information 

FOLLOW IT THROUGH. Freshman Adrienne Cutburth 2000-2001 LADiES' BASKETBALL TEAM. Head Coach John Raff; Assistant Coaches Stacy 
keeps her eye on the goal as she takes a shot in the heat the Cox ' A 9 nieszka PezzL Clarisse Arredondo, Emily Brown, Sandy Burris, Allison Cash, Adrienne Cutburth, 

Julie Danieles, Kayla Forster, Takeo Gant, Janna Lhotsky, Katie Nicol, Aliexis Pettway, Louise Smyth, 
moment during a game against Texas Pan American. „ 

Gabrysia Troczka. 



138 lSports 




PASS IT ON . Freshman Julie Danieles wastes no time in 
passing the ball down the court to another teammate as a 
Texas Pan American player stays hot on her tail to block the 
pass. 

COMPLETELY IN CONTROL. Senior Sandy Burris 
maintains ball control while she dribbles quickly down the 
court towards the goal. 



II 



)ONT GIVE IT UP! Freshman Alexis Pettway hangs on to 
ie ball with all of her might to prevent the Texas Pan American 
3am from making a steal. 



home games in bold 

Troy State University L85-96 

McNeese State L58-73 

Sam Houston State L45-92 

Northwestern State L49-92 

Univ. of New Orleans L52-83 

McNeese State L42-73 

Louisiana-Monroe L49-99 

Troy State Univ. L81-86 

Louisiana Tech L34-100 

Texas L37-135 

Texas A&M L49-94 

Alcorn State L43-68 

Southeastern LA L54-76 

UC-Riverside L62-95 

Nicholls State L59-87 

Lipscomb University L54-74 

Texas-Pan American L47-76 

Northwestern State L62-102 
TX A&M-Corpus 

Christi L60 " 96 

Birmingham-Southern L57-72 

UC-Riverside L62-63 

Belmont University L48-60 

Texas-Pan American L82-87 

TX A&M-Corpus Christi L51-91 

Birmingham- L63-66 

Southern 

Lipscomb University L66-86 

Belmont University L33-61 



Record: 0-27 




photo courtesy ot: Sports Information 
A CAPTIVE AUDIENCE. Team- 
mates lean in to get a closer look while 
they watch the game and support the 
girls on the court. 

REACHING HIGH. Sophomore 
Kayla Forster jumps up with energy and 
excitement in an attempt to catch the ball 
before her opponent can. 

Ladies' Basketball |l39 



Gymnastics 



home meets in bold 

Southeast Missouri -| 89 050 
State 



Texas Women's 
University 

LSU 

Texas Women's 
University 

Auburn 



Texas Women's 
University 

Winonoa State 
University 

Winona State 
University 

llliniois State 



Air Force Academy 187.875 



Air Force Academy 189.875 

USAG Division II 

Nationals 6th Place 



Record: 3-16 



Lucky 
Charms 



"Eat well, and get lots of sleep. 
Dedicate the meet to our God 
with the Lord's Prayer; our 
team has a chant that we do 
before every meet." 

Audrey Mitchell, 
Sophomore 

"Take a nice warm bath/ 
shower before the meet, and 
put on Toasted Hazelnut lo- 
tion from Bath & Body Works. 
It just makes me feel good!" 
Brandi Dunn, Junior 




photo courtesy of: Magan ( 
_S. The girls take a break from 
eating to pose for a photo at the banquet after Nationals. The 
team placed sixth overall with Senior Lina Hakola receiving Ail- 
American status on Floor and Sophomore Janelle Thibault 
receiving Ail-American status on Vault. 

;OU VENIR SHOTS. The girls rest for a while in Colorado 
Springs at the Olympic Training Center 



140 Sports 






1 o 



ON THIER WAY. Seniors Aimee McQueen, Una Hakola, 
Juniors Magan Graham, Brandi Dunn, and Sophomores Melanie 
Moeck and Christen Moulden ride together in the van on the 
way to their competition against their top rivals, Texas Women's 
University. 



| PROUD TO BE AN AMERICAN. The gymnasts hang 

o out in the Olympic rings at the Olympic training center in 

§- Colorado Springs. The team was there for a set of competitions 

3 against Air Force Academy. 







































. 










jt i n I | 

mm mm 

gymnastics team gains national attention 

By: Amy Waguespack 



Water Break 



Senior Lina Hakola finished her 
final year on the team with the 
career scores of: 9.1 on Vault, 
9.65 on Bars, 9.85 on Beam, 
9.925 on Floor. Her greatest 
accomplishment is making All- 
American on floorat Nationals. "I 
do not get nervous before a meet," she says. "I used 
to in club gymnastics, but a college meet is nothing 
compared to that. I'm usually the one on the team 
acting a fool before the meet and trying to calm 
everyone else down." 







SHINING 
BRIGHT. 
Sophomores 
Audrey 
Mitchell, 
Bonnie Kulosa, 
Melanie 
Moeck, Tasha 
Rogers, and 
Junior Magan 
Graham take a 
break from the 
rigorous com- 
petition life to 
pose for photos 
at the Olympic 
Training Center 
in Colorado 
Springs during 
a meet against 
Air Force Acad- 
emy. 




photo courtesy of: Magan Graham 
000-2001 GYMNASTICS TEAM. Head Coach Bill Hardy. Merrick Buchanan (did not 
Dmpete to study abroad), Brandi Dunn, Magan Graham, Lina Hakola, Bonnie Kulosa, Aimee 
IcQueen, Audrey Mitchell, Melanie Moeck, Christen Moulden, Tasha Rogers,Janelle Thibault. 



Ho^r do you calm 

yotur nerves* lj>e* 

fore si jmee*:? 




"I try to just go in, 
have fun, and 
compete like it is 
just a regular 
workout. I really 
don't get all that 
nervous, I like to 
compete." 
Tasha Rogers, 
Sophomore 




"I talk myself 
through things a lot. 
I tell myself that I 
know I can do this 
because I do it ev- 
ery day. Positive 
thoughts are always 
best. " 

Christen 

Moulden, 

Sophomore 



■' : " ■■'■■ ■' 



1 



"I like to listen to 
music and pray 
before meets to 
calm my 

nerves." 

Melanie 

Moeck, 
Sophomore 



Gymnasticsl l4l 



I I_l 

1 1 



n 




rifle team blows 'em away 

By: Amy Waguespack 



GETTING 
PRE- 
PARED. 
Sophomore 
Lisa Mull 

handles some 
bullets during a 
practice ses- 
sion for Rifle 
Team. The 
members of the 
team put in lots 
of hours of prac- 
tice to make 
sure their 
shooting is al- 
ways done to 
perfection. 



A!M....FIRE! Junior Josh Greer takes his time to line up with 
the target before firing his rifle. "Every time I shoot, I think of my 
dad and how he used to take me hunting and how I always tried 
to impress him with my shooting. It's still the same after all these 
years," Greer says. 

"IN' IT ALL TOGETHER Sophomore Lisa Mull 
gets her rifle adjusted just right so that hitting the target is no 
problem. "It's really hard when you have to hold the rifle in three 
different positions. You shoot prone, standing, and kneeling. 
The standing is the hardest one, and sometimes it's really hard 
to keep your gun steady, but if you take your time, breathe, and 
§ relax you can maintain a high score," says Mul 




How do you calm 

your jnorvoss l>Ojf oro 

sl ooixjiij>^titiojjri? 



photo by: Amy W. 

"The way I calm myself 
down is to make a joke 
out of it. I usually fire the 
first shot way before 
anyone is ready, which 
starts the clock. It makes 
everyone upset." 
John Harper, 
Junior 



i42lSports 




photo by: Life touch 



"I really don't get ner- 
vous. It is more like just 
doubting my ability to 
shoot on target or not. I 
take a moment and 
breathe and remember 
that this is fun and not to 
worry." 
Valerie McDonald, 
Freshman 




photo by: Amy Waguespack 
2000-2001 RIFLE TEAM. Daniel Duzan, Josh Greer, John Harper, Chad Hendricks, Ja 

Hood, Valerie McDonald, Aimee McQueen, Lisa Mull, Kathryn Southam. 




IRE AWAY, Rifle team members Josh Greer and John Harper, both Juniors, take aim and shoot at 
eir targets during a practice session. 



TCU Invitational 



Gents:3873 
Ladies:2548 



TCU (Shoulder to Gents:3873 
Shoulder) Ladies:2548 



Texas A&M 
Invitational 

Texas A&M 
(Shoulder to 
Shoulder) 

Texas A&M 



Gents:3815 
Ladies:2974 

Gents:3815 
Ladies:2974 



Gents:3925 
Ladies:2872 



Tennessee-Martin Gents: 8th 
Invitational (3894) 

Ladies: 10th 
(3093) 



Missouri-Kansas 


Gents:3894 


City (Shoulder to 


Ladies:3093 


Shoulder) 




Murray State 


Gents:16th 


Invitational 


(3949) 




Ladies: 18th 




(3056) 



Texas Christian Gents: 1969 
(White-Half-Match) Ladies: 1635 

Texas Christian Gents: 1969 
(Purple-Half-Match) Ladies:1635 

NCAA Sectionals Gents:3rd 
(3959) 
Ladies:3364 

Missouri-Kansas Gents:3959 
City (Shoulder to Ladies:3364 
Shouder) 



Lucky 



arms 



"I always trim my toenails. Don't ask me why." 
Josh Greer, Junior 

"I always get nervous before I shoot in a rifle 

competition; yet, I really don't do anything to 

settle my nerves." 

Lisa Mull, Sophomore 



Rifle 



143 



<lUJ -h- 

_l_t_ 

baseball team bats in 23 victories 

By: Ashley Knecht 



bN! The team got the opportunity to do quite a bit of 
traveling. They even got to go to Hawaii. Some of the guys got 
into the spirit of things with their hats and Hawaiian shirts. Here 
the guys "hang ten" for a while when they are not playing or 
preparing for a game. 

ALOHA! Team members hang out in the stands and even 
catch a few rays while they wait to play their game in the Hawaii 
Tournament in Honolulu, Hawaii. 




DUGOUT 

Sev- 
eral players sit 
in the dugout 
while they pay 
close attention 
to the game out 
in the field. 
Hanging out in 
the dugout 
gives players a 
chance to col- 
lect their 
thoughts about 
games and 
about baseball 
in general. 
Freshman 
Tony Cardone 
says, "My fa- 
vorite things 
about baseball 
are the fans and 
all of the history 
that comes 
along with the 
game." 



"My favorite 
memory is the 
home run I hit 
against Ne- 
braska, and we 
won the game." 
Jason Schick, 
Senior 



144 ISports 



"I won't forget the 
long road trips on 
the bus and the 
great Tom 

Cruise movies 
we watched all 
the time." 
Casey Handy, 
Senior 



photo supplied by: media guic 
2000-2001 GENTS BASEBALL. Head Coach Ed McCann, Assistant Coaches Michael Barry, Bill Ostermeyer 
and Tracy Roles. Jesse Allen, Robbie Buhl, Tony Cardone, Kevin Cassidy, Dan Davenport, Mark Duranski, Bobb; 
Gilliam, B.J. Grenda, Ryan Hageman, Casey Handy, Mike Hicks, Josh Ickes, Lance Mathis, Mark Nonis, Jef 
Poulin, Patrick Rhodes, Tyler Robertson, Joe Robideaux, Brian Scanlon, Jason Schick, Blane Sessions, Ryan Stephens 
Bryan Treanor, Nick Waak, Seth Winterer, Dustin Wright. 





photo supplied by: media guide 
SENIOR PLAYERS. Robbie Buhl, Mark Duranski, 
Ryan Hageman, Casey Handy, Mike Hicks, Jeff Poulin, 
Josh Schick, Blane Sessions, Dustin Wright. 

WINDING IT UP. Senior Jason Schick concentrates as 
Junior Nick Waak prepares for a pitch. The guys were 
cheered on this season by their fans in the new Shehee 
stadium. The team also enjoyed a new locker room. 



SE Louisiana 
SE Louisiana 
SE Louisiana 
Nicholls State 
Nicholls State 
Texas-Arlington (1) 
Texas-Arlington (2) 
Northwestern State 
St. Louis 
Iowa State 
Louisiana Tech 
LSUS 

Northwestern State 
Oral Roberts 
Southern Illinois 
Texas-Arlington 
Arkansas-Pine Bluff (1) 



L5-12 

L6-11 

L4-11 

L7-13 

L 16-28 

L2-3 

L5-6 

L4-13 

W9-4 

T6-6 

L7-12 

W6-2 

W4-3 

L5-6 

L2-10 

L8-9 

W 17-1 



Arkansas-Pine Bluff (2) W 13-0 



Lamar (1) 


L5-11 


Lamar (2) 


W 12-1 


LeTourneau 


W 17-2 


#5 Nebraska (1) 


L4-17 


#5 Nebraska (2) 


W9-8 


#5 Nebraska 


L 1-12 


Kansas State 


L2-6 


Arkansas 


LO-5 


TX A&M-Corpus Christi 


W 11-8 


TX A&M-Corpus-Christi 


W 14-3 


(1) 




TX A&M-Corpus-Christi 


W11-1 


(2) 




Lewis-Clark St. 


L 1-11 


Kita-Kyushu (Exh.) 


W5-4 


CA-Santa Barbara 


L7-9 


Hawaii 


L3-12 


Hawaii Pacific 


W8-5 


Wichita State 


L0-10 


Wichita State 


L2-6 


Louisiana Tech 


L4-15 


Wiley College 


W 14-4 


TX A&M-Corpus Christi (1 


)L 10-12 


TX A&M-Corpus Christi (2) W 12-10 


TX A&M-Corpus Christi 


L7-8 


Sam Houston State (1) 


W8-7 


Sam Houston State (2) 


L6-11 


Louisiana Tech 


W11-8 


TX-Pan American (1) 


L7-10 


TX-Pan American (2) 


L4-7 


TX-Pan American 


L4-13 


Louisiana-Monroe 


W4-3 


Louisiana-Monroe 


W4-3 


LSUS 


L8-11 


Alcorn State (1) 


W11-1 


Alcorn State (2) 


W 11-1 


Alcorn State 


W 15-6 


East Texas Baptist 


W 13-3 


Lamar (1) 


W9-8 


Lamar (2) 


LO-13 


Oklahoma 


LO-5 


Oklahoma 


L1-7 


Oklahoma 


L7-16 


Northwestern State 


W 10-9 



Record: 23-36-1 















larms 










"It's kind of odd, but 1 always have 
to brush my teeth before 1 play. 
I've always done it and it has be- 
come a kind of security blanket 
for me." 

Joe Robideaux, Senior 



Gents Baseball 



145 



s__rf ft I 

softball team brings home the wins 

By: Jennifer Hawkins 



OUT Sopho- 
more Shannon Fleishman concentrates 
for a moment as she prepares to throw 
another strike. "I was concentrating on 
getting the batter out and doing anything 
I can to help this one girl out," says 
Fleishman. 



The Best Thing 
About The Season... 





"When we 

started winning! 
It felt like we all 
pulled together 
as a team and 
good things 
started to hap- 
pen." 

Rachel Alcorn, 
Junior 



"Coming to- 
gether not only 
as friends but 
also as a team 
and winning 
some great ball 
games. Hawaii 
was also great!" 
Katie Meinen, 
Sophomore 





t! 






.T 


^pr 


O 






1 n 


u 


1 .. ... 1 






i/i 




n 




o 


• 










3 






UK 


" 




"The opportunity 
to meet and bond 
with an entire 
group of strang- 
ers that would 
soon become my 
teammates and 
friends." 
Jessica Haas, 
Freshman 





photo courtesy of: Sports Information 

2000-2001 LADIES' SOFTBALL TEAM. Head Coach Lisa Root, Assistant Coach Joel Prickett, Assistant Coach Jill Staff. 
ON HER TOES. Sophomore 

Lauren Jackson eagerly awaits a Rachel Alcorn, Sherilyn Bossier, Nikki Boudreaux, Cathleen Byrne, Lisa Carbone, Cheyenne Daries, Shannon Fleishman, Jessica 

ball to come her way. "When on 

the field I am always on my toes Haas, Lauren Jackson, Jennifer Koehn, Lory Kowaleski, Jordan Lansdale, Susan Larson, Amanda LeBlanc, Ursula Maroski, Katie 

hoping that they will hit the ball to Meinen Catherine Olson, Brooke Ponder, Gretchen Schmaltz, Amanda Sharp, Traci Smith, Katherine Townley. 
me, Jackson says. 



146 lSports 




Words of Wisdom 

seniors give advice to younger teammates 



Take summer school!!!! Get all your core 
classes out of the way so that you aren't 
crammed your last semester!" 

Kitty Townley, Senior 

"When sports and school seem too much to 
handle hang in there because it is all worth it 
in the end." 

Cathy Olson, Senior 



"Enjoy it while you can because it doesn't last 
long!" 

Susan Larson, Senior 



NOT ANOTHER STEP. Sophomore Katie Meinen 
dares the runner to take just one more step away from the 
base. Meinen says, "The runners better think twice before 
trying to steal on me!" 

GROUP HUDDLE. Senior Cathy Olson, Junior Rachel 
Alcorn, Sophomores Shannon Fleishman and Katie Meinen, 
and Freshmen Jordan Lansdale and Traci Smith gather 
together on the pitcher's mound to have a quick pep talk. 
Smith says, "We make some very intersting comments out 
there to help lighten things up." 



J 


^*Li * ^*b ^fc» ^M 




|^gp#t JMr 



photo courtesy of: Sports Information 



Water Break 

photo courtesy of: Sports Information 

As Co-Captain and a four year 
veteran outfielder for the 
Centenary Ladies, Las Vegas 
native Susan Larson (#5) is 
Centenary's all-time leader in 
games played, at bats, and 
walks. This was her last year as a Centenary Lady. 
She also served as sports editor for The Con- 
glomerate . 





home games i 


n bold 


Southern Arkansas 


L2-3 


Louisiana Tech (1) 


LO-2 


Louisiana Tech (2) 


L2-5 


Stephen F. Austin (1) 


L0-9 


Stephen F. Austin (2) 


L2-6 


McNeese State (1) 


L 1-4 


McNeese State (2) 


LO-7 


Southern University 


W 13-4 


UC-Santa Barbara 


L1-9 


Cal State Fullerton 


LO-16 


Auburn 


L 1-15 


Hawaii 


L4-12 


UC Santa Barbara 


LO-4 


Auburn 


L2-8 


Northwestern State 


LO-8 


Boston College 


L 0-1 1 


Louisiana-Lafayette 


L2-13 


Boston College 


L 0-1 1 


SE Louisiana (1) 


W9-8 


SE Louisiana (2) 


L3-7 


East Texas Baptist 


W9-3 


Nicholls State (1) 


LO-8 


Nicholls State (2) 


L9-11 


Arkansas-Pine Bluff (1) 


W 11-0 


Arkansas-Pine Bluff (2) 


W 13-0 


Southern Arkansas 


L2-3 


Prarie View A&M (1) 


W 10-8 


Prarie View A&M (2) 


W 12-4 


Nicholls State (1) 


L5-7 


Nicholls State (2) 


L1-6 


Wisconson-Superior 


W2-0 


SE Louisiana (1) 


L2-10 


SE Louisiana (2) 


L4-7 


Texas A&M-Corpus Christi L 2-10 


New Mexico 


LO-3 


Brown 


W11-7 


Texas A&M-Corpus Christi L 0-9 


Brown 


W6-4 


Samford (1) 


L3-9 


Samford (2) 


L4-5 


Arkansas-Pine Bluff (1] 


W 12-0 


Arkansas-Pine Bluff (2] 


W9-1 


Louisiana Tech (1) 


L0-2 


Louisiana Tech (2) 


L2-5 


Sam Houston State (1 


W5-4 


Sam Houston State (2 


W 1-0 


McNeese State (1) 


L4-5 


McNeese State (2) 


W3-2 


Stephen F. Austin 


L1-6 


Virginia 


L4-12 


Virginia 


L2-8 


Tennessee 


L2-9 


Stephen F. Austin 


W6-3 


Tennessee 


L3-13 


Belmont (1) 


W6-4 


Belmont (2) 


W9-5 


Southern University 


W 12-7 


Sam Houston State (1) 


LO-2 


Sam Houston State (2) 


L6-8 


Stephen F. Austin (1) 


L1-4 


Stephen F. Austin (2) 


W5-4 


Texas A&M-Corpus 


W5-1 


Christi (1) 




Texas A&M-Corpus 


L 1-5 


Christi (2) 




Texas A&M-Corpus Christi L 0-7 


Louisiana-Lafayette (1) 


LO-6 


Louisiana-Lafayette (2) 


L 1-14 



Record: 21-45 



WAITING TO POUNCE. Freshman 
Lauren Koehn sits ready to pounce as soon 
as the ball is hit. "Just bring it," she says of her 
game motto. 



Ladies Softball 147 



Cross Con 



Arkansas- 
Little Rock 

Louisiana- 
Monroe(men) 

Top Performer 



Louisiana- 
Monroe 
(women) 
Top Performer 



Louisiana Tech 
(men) 

Top Performer 



Louisiana Tech 
(women) 

Top Performer 



Louisiana- 
Lafayette 
(men) 
Top Performer 



Louisiana- 
I Lafayette 
(women) 
Top Performer 

Northwestern 
State (men) 

Top Performer 



Northwestern 
State (women) 

Top Performer 



Unavailable 


if, 






6th 


Q. 

Q, 


Centenary 
184 


3 
O 


Jason 


o 

-c 


Hoeltzel 





4th 

Centenary 

81 

Aimee 
Robinson 

4th 

Centenary 

108 

Jason 
Hoeltzel 

3rd 

Centenary 

65 

Aimee 
Robinson 

T-9th 

Centenary 

288 

Casey 
Muller 

10th 

Centenary 

238 

Aimee 
Robinson 

5th 

Centenary 

147 

Jason 
Hoeltzel 

5th 

Centenary 

99 

Aimee 
Robinson 



Lucky 
Charms 



"I wear my hair in pigtails for 
each race for good luck.. .it 
seems to be working. 
Heather Butler, Sophomore 

"Before every race we do a little 
chant, 'CCC,' which stands for 
Centenary Cross Country." 
Ester Seitz, Freshman 

"I have a lucky T-shirt I wearfor 
every race. It has been work- 
ing for me for four years, so 
why mess with tradition?" 
Jason Hoeltzel, Senior 



148 Sports 




photo supplied by: Lauren Jackson 
JUMPIN' JACK-O-LANTERNS! Senior Susan Larson 
and Sophomore Lauren Jackson carve pumpkins with Assistant 
Coach Shelly Schneider and Head Coach Julie Cavalier and her 
kids. "Julie is the kind of coach that you could tell anything. I think 
she felt the same way about us. She opened up her life and her 
family to the team," states Larson. 

BAD HAIR DAY. Sophomore Lauren Jackson and Junior 
Heather Butler participate in "Bad Hair Day" for the team 
members. "You can't have perfect hair all the time when you 
have to run 24-7," says Jackson. 




ALL IN A ROW. Assistant Coach Shelly Schneider, Junior 
Virgnia Jones, Junior Heather Butler, Freshman Jessica Haas, 
Sophomore Lauren Jackson, Freshman Traci Smith, and Sopho- 
more Virginia O'Donnell take a quick break while hiking in Hot 
Springs, Arkansas. "We always find time to take a quick pic 
between races," Butler states. 

EAT YOUR HEART OUT. The team pays a visit to the 
Olive Garden restaurant to fill their bellies during their trip to 
Little Rock, Arkansas. "The best thing about traveling with the 
team is eating out!" says Jeff Sozt. 




Water Break 

photo by: Ashley Knecht 

Senior Jason Hoeltzel had a 
successful run around thetrack 
this season. He was repeatedly 
the top performer. Hoeltzel 
says, "My best year was fresh- 
man year when I was voted 
most dedicated and motivated. The team has 
really improved since the start of its 'rebuilding' 
three yearsago. I'm proudtosay I'ma memberof 
such a great team." 




■ mt ■ 

iijl n 5 if 

_ 

cross country laps the competition 

By: Ashley Knecht 

it ■** 




FEEL THE 
BURN! The 
team trains 
year-round in 
order to be in 
top condition for 
their meets. 
Sophomore 
Jessie Miller 
watches 
a s J u n i o r 
Heather Butler 
lifts weights in 
the fitness cen- 
ter so that she 
may keep her 
muscles in top 
shape. 
"Heather and I 
love the new fit- 
ness facilities," 
says Miller. 




photo supplied by: Lauren Jackson 

3 COUNTRY TEAM. Head Coach Julie Cavalier, Assistant Coach 

Shelly Schneider. Kyle Aaron, Robbie Buhl, Heather Butler, Christian Castalanas, Jessica Haas, 

Mohammid Hason, Jason Hoeltzel, Lauren Jackson, Virginia Jones, Susan Larson, Jessica 

Miller, Casey Muller, Virginia O'Donnell, Aimee Robinson, Ester Seitz, Traci Smith, Jeff Sozt. 



What xss tli^ l3^sst 

part of cross 

country? 




'The best part of 

the trips is the 

food." 

Kyle Aaron, 

Sophomore 




"The fact that we 
can score the 
most points 
boosts the 
team's morale." 
Jeff Szot, 
Freshman 




"I have been run- 
ning competi- 
tiveiy since I was 
seven. I've done 
it so long that at 
times I get tired 
of it, but my best 
friend is on the 
team. ..and she 
keeps me go- 
ing.'' 

Jessie Miller, 
Sophomore 



Cross Country 1 149 



: INALE. Leading Ladies dance 
line members finish off a high-energy dance 
with a final pose. The Ladies were found at all 
the basketball games cheering and dancing 
for both teams. 






Jwo ^W» • WP ^ ^W i * iHP^ ^w* ?^^ a 

iiijiiir ■>■ 



"I enjoyed the new friend- 
ships that were made 
through dance line, having 
fun at the games, and sup- 
porting the team." 

Joy Banks, 

Sophomore 




"I really enjoyed cheering at 
the games, dancing at half- 
time, and supporting the 
team." 

Emily Primeaux, 
Senior 



have thoroughly enjoyed 
being on dance line this 
year. It is a great way to get 
involved on campus and 
have lots of fun, too!" 
Freshman 
Vanessa Curtis 




END WITH A BANG. Dance line 
members pose proudly as they take in 
the applause from the audience after 
they finish a dance. 

ON THE SIDELINES. Dance line 
members get together for a photo oppor- 
tunity while they take a break from cheer- 
ing on the sidelines for the basketball 
teams. 




Words of Wisdom 



"Remember to always wear a bow that 
matches your uniform." 

Freshman Laura Harper 



Enjoy extra-curricular activities, and 
get involved, but be sure to have your 
priorities in order." 

Senior Jennifer Grain 



150 1 Sports 




llllllll 





leading ladies get into the groove 

By: Mary Meriam 



The Best Thing 
About The Season... 



"I loved dancing on Dance line this 
year. It has allowed me to form new 
friendships, improve on my dancing, 
and promote school spirit." 
Vicki Kintner, 
Freshman 



"I enjoyed getting to meet new people 
and getting to show support for our 
sports teams." 

Jennifer Crain, 
Senior 



"As both the captain and a senior I 
spent a lot of time observing the 
girls, and I just want them to know 
that they were all Fabulous Super- 
stars this year. I would also like to 
thank them for all their hard work, 
and there was a lot of it, and dedi- 
cation to this volunteer activity." 
Keeley Larned, 
Junior 



PARTNERS AND PALS. Senior Laura 
Lindsay and Sophomore Wendy Paul enjoy the 
fact that being on dance line brought friendships 
closer together. "I've been on the dance line for 
three years. This year the dance line got to be 
very close, which allowed us to work together as 
a team, which made it the best season ever," 
says Senior Keeley Larned, Captain. 





UP The audience watches as dance line 



photo submitted by: Leading Ladies 

2000-20(31 LEADING LADIES DANCE LINE. Captain: Keeley Larned, Co-Captain: Emily SHAKE 

members perform a dance during half time in the Gold Dome. 
=ri m eaux.JoyBanks,AngelaCage,JenniferCrain,VanessaCurtis,LauraHarper,LaurenHerndon, Vicki The Lad|es pyt |p g gregt amoupt Qf practjce tQ perfect the 

<intner, Laura Lindsay, Wendy Paul, Amanda Rundell, Lauren Stallings. dances and entertain the audience. 



Leading Ladles Dance Linehsi 



FLYING HIGH. The cheerleaders wow the crowd as they „ 

c 

throw one of the squad members high into the air at a perfor- ft 
mance in the Gold Dome. The addition of guys to the squad this °= 
year helped the cheerleaders add to their performances with "§ 
more stunts. o 

OJ 

S 
o 

G-E-N-T-S!!! Freshman Kristen Paxson shows her spirit § 

-c 
ex 

as she works to get the crowd pumped up during one of the 
games. 




IN PERFECT 
MOTION. Jun- 
ior DelanieHebert, 
Sophomore Suzie 
Golas, and Fresh- 
man April Landry 
move their arms in 
stiff, sharp motions 
to keep their rou- 
tine neat and 
clean. Sophomore 
Drew Sutton as- 
sists with thecheer 
by yelling from be- 
hind the girls 
through a mega- 
phone. 

152 1 Sports 






photo courtesy of: Public Relations 

SHOWING SOME LEG. Freshman Kristen Paxson does a stunt in the a, 
during one of the routines the squad performed during halftime at the basketba 
games. 



t e M a o 

■■'■■■' fl^^^HH ' MB» ^*av^^ 

s. — « 

cheerleaders show their school pride 

By: Amy Waguespack 




photo courtesy ot: Pudlic Relations ~ 
GETTING INTO THE GROOVE. The squad has a blast on the court while they keep the 
crowd hyped up with one of their routines they worked so hard to perfect. 



STANDING 
TALL AND 
PROUD. The 
cheerleaders 
make all the 
hard work they 
do look really 
easy. They 
must use bal- 
ance, coordina- 
tion, creativity, 
strength, and a 
lot of hard work 
to pull off their 
routines. They 
must practice 
regularly, how- 
ever, to perfect 
their stunts and 
their routines so 
they can keep 
the crowd ex- 
cited. 

SHOW 
YOUR 
SPIRIT! The 
guys jump on 
an opportunity 
during a break 
in the game to 
yell out to the 
crowd and 
pump up their 
school spirit. 



Cheerleaders l i 53 



ladies golf drives through season 

By: Nikki Doughty 



The ladies' golf team dines out at a 
restaurant in Mexico during their visit to Edinberg, Texas for a tournament against 
UTPA. Volleyball coach Holly Tarter made a special trip as a stand-in coach for the 
competition. 





Gulf Coast Collegiate Classic 
Top Performer 

Raising Cane Classic 
Top Performer 

Tulsa Hilton Southern 
Hills Classic 
Top Performer 

Louisiana Lottery Intercol- 
legiate Invitational 
Top Performer 

Hal Sutton Intercollegiate 
Top Performer 

Pizza Hut/Bell South Classic 
Top Performer 

Bob Brown/Sportscare Classic 
Top Performer 

Moe O'Brien Golf Invitational 
Top Performer 



6th 318(+30) 
Dave Campbell 

11th 949(+97) 
Dave Campbell 

18th 

645(+69) 
Dave Campbell 

12th 

970(+106) 
Dave Campbell 

8th 629(+53) 
Dave Campbell 

10th 636(+60) 
Dave Campbell 

17th 657(+81) 
Dave Campbell 

16th 1033(+169) 
Zach Larrimer 




2000-2001 LADIES' GOLF TEAM. Coach Buck Fulco. Emily Bankston, Maria Frederick 
(captain), Liz Holland, D'Ahn Inman, Carolyn Morris, Ashley Neal, Anna Walls. "We'd like to thank 
graduating seniors Maria Frederick and Carolyn Morris for not only helping to start the team, but for being 
strong leaders throughout your four years. Good Luck." 



i54 JSports 



THE FINAL HOLE. Seniors Maria 
Frederick, D'Ahn Inman, Carolyn Morris, Anna 
Walls, and Sophomore Emily Bankston give 
each other some support for their last tourna- 
ment against Sam Houston State in Houston, 
Texas at the Elkins Lake golf course. 




CHOW TIME. Seniors D'Ahn Inman and Maria Frederick 
enjoy some good cooking at Chili's Restaurant after their last 
tournament of the season. 



Ptarmigan Ram 
Fall Classic 
Top Performer 

Lamar Lady Car- 
dinal 

Invitational 
Top Performer 



Lady Indian Clas- 
sic 
Top Performer 




15th 

1062(+198) 
D'Ahn Inman 

9th 
1086(+198) 

Maria 
Frederick 

16th 

703+(127) 
Ashly Neal 




Centenary Ladies 5th 
Invitational 720+(152 

Top Performer Liz Holland 



Jackson State 4th 
Invitational 661 +(77) 

Top Performer Carolyn 
Morris 




Oral Roberts 9th 

Invitational 702+(126) 

Top Performer D'Ahn 
Inman 

Elkins Lake 4th 

Invitational 712+(128) 

Top Performer Carolyn 
Morris 



A SPECIAL 
PRESENTA- 
TION. Seniors 
D'Ahn Inman, 
Carolyn Morris, 
and Anna Walls eat 
some Chili's food 
after the last tour- 
nament. The girls 
all particpated in a 
golf ball signing 
ceremony in which 
the seniors are pre- 
sented with golf 
balls that are 
signed by the other 
teammates. 



Golf 155 



Hliiyilttttfyimtv 




home games in 


bold 










Arkansas (DH) 


L 0-7 




Louisiana-Lafayette 


LO-7 






W 4-^ 




Southern 


LO-7 




n lsu 




Southeastern LA 


L 1-6 




Alcorn State 


W5-2 




niuwi ii v# iu lv 






| Texas Tech 


LO-6 




Montana 


L 2-5 










Air Force 


LO-7 




" Gustavus Adolphus 


L 1-6 










Colorado 


L 0-7 




Texas-San Antonio 


LO-7 




1 aiTIPI* 


L2-5 




Ldl 1 Idl 




Texas-Arlington 


LO-7 






i r\ ~7 




New Orleans 


L 0-7 




Prari^ \7iA\Af A A M 


W7-0 




riciiic view MOtivi 




Louisiana-Monroe 


L 1-6 






LO-5 




Rice 




Texas-Pan American 


L3-4 




_ Texas A&M-Corpus 


L 0-7 




, Christi 






Jackson State 

Tpyac-A rM nntnn 


L3-4 
i n./i 




1 rjAdO nl III lylUI 1 i— \j —r 

Record: 3-20 




156 Sports 




ON'T LET IT GO. Centenary soccer players gave their 
all in a match against the alumni during Alumni weekend. 

GETTING INTO IT. The Gents basketball coaches hold 
HIT IT OUT OF THE PARK. A 

softball player steps up to bat and works themselves back on the sidelines as they yell out their thoughts 
on maintaining total concentration dur- 
ing a game. on tne latest action in the game. 




SLAM IT! The basketball team came out full force for the 
Sneak Peek exhibition of the new fitness center. Students and 
faculty gathered around as the players showed off their basket- 
ball skills. 

GOOD PLAY, Although competition was in the air, the 
soccer players in the alumni game were not afraid to show 
respect for their opponents' talented moves on the field. 



Editor's note: We originally planned for this page to feature the tennis 
teams. However, we are unable to feature tennis due to lack of pictures, 
so this page is now a hodgepodge of photographs we have of sports, hut we 
are able to feature the scores from the tennis matches. The yearbook staff 
takes full responsibility for the lack of photographs , and we apologize to the 
tennis teams for not being able to offer more coverage of their season. 

By: Nikki Doughty 




REBOUND 
REACTION. 
Senior Olufemi 
O d u k o y a 
catches some 
air as he works 
with another 
teammate to 
keep the ball 
away from a 
Texas Pan 
American 
player. 




home games in bold 






POME TOGETHER. Chi Omegas come together from all over to particpate in the Chi 
Dmega Alumni vs. Active flag football game. 



McNeese State 


Rained Out 


LSU 


LO-7 


Southern 


L3-4 


SE Louisiana 


L1-6 


Lamar 


L2-5 


McNeese State 


LO-7 


Northwestern State 


L2-5 


Louisiana-Lafayette 


LO-6 


Alcorn State 


W5-2 


Stephen F. Austin 


L1-6 


Arkansas-Little Rock 


LO-7 


Louisiana Tech 


W5-2 


Tarleton State 


W5-2 


Northwestern State 


Rained Out 


Prarie View A&M 


W7-0 


Jackson State 


W4-2 


Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 


L2-4 


Record: 5-10 






Hodgepodge | 



FUNNY BONES. 
Junior ZTA member 
Christy Melton and 
Sophomore TKE 
member Adam Dufour 
take a moment at the 
Homecoming tailgate 
party to pose with Mr. 
Bones. "I had to take a 
picture with those 
guys. They were the 
most awesome ones 
at the tailgate party," 
says Melton. 



158 [Creels 




\ 



>-.. *~- 











knows special-'^b o n 

By: Nikki Doughty 
The bonds Greek members form within the Greek 
system are priceless and long-lasting. There are many 
opportunities for Greek members to strengthen their 
f riendships.The Panhellenic and Interf raternity Coun- 
cils work to make sure Greek life is the best it can be for 
everyone. Rush is anticipated each year as Greeks 
welcome new members to their organizations, and 
soon after, sacred bonds are formed as big and little 
sisters and brothers are united. Each organization 
works to help out the community, whether it is ZetaTau 
Alpha working to promote breast cancer awareness or 
Kappa Alpha working for the Muscular Dystrophy As- 
sociation. Swaps, such as the Chi Omega/Tau Kappa 
Epsilon Mice Races, provide the perfect opportunity to 
kick back and relax. Theme parties like Kappa Sigma's 
South Seas orTheta Chi's Rummage and Reggae are 
a hit with the whole campus since everyone is allowed 
to join in the fun. Formals are a great chance to get 
dressed up and share an evening of dinner and dancing 
with their dates and other chapter members. Another 
addition to all the fun events is Greek Week, an annual 
event for all Greek members to come together for a 
week of fun and games. Whether it's through a service 
project, a study group, or a party, special bonds are 
formed that Greeks learn to cherish for a lifetime. 




Divider 1 159 



2000-2001 
PANHEL- 
L E N i C 
COUNCIL. 
Amy Calvert, 
Allison 
C o u rv i 1 1 e , 
Vanessa 
Curtis, Liz 
Daughen- 
baugh, Amy 
Gardner, Mel- 
issa Guillory, 
R e b e k a h 
Lage rson , 
Aimee Lange, 
Karen Loftin, 
Michelle 
Magee, Emily 
P ri meaux , 
Elizabeth 
Q u i I I e n , 
Rebecca 
S o s k i n . 










TOP 5 


GOALS OF THE YEAR 


1. 


Strengthen Greek life on campus. 


2. 


Prepare for Recruitment week. 


3. 


Train new members. 


4. 


Participate in fundraisers. 


5. 


Perform community service. 



how have panhellenic 
and ifc improved? 

"The IFC has been reborn thanks to diligent efforts of 
a strong corps of officers, fraternity presidents, and 
representatives. I would like to personally thank 
Andrew Irby and Ryan Kraemer for their tremendous 
aid in bettering the Greek system." 

Stuart Ponder, Sophomore 

"All of the council members on Panhellenic came 
together as a group and worked really hard. 
Panhellenic has really prepared for a great recruit- 
ment week next fall." 

Emily Primeaux, Junior 




LISTEN UP! Freshman Eric Camp listened closely while 
Sophomore Ryan Kraemer voices his opinion in an IFC meeting. 



PLANNING AHEAD. Juniors Karen Loftin and Emily 
Primeaux work with Sophomore Liz Daughenbaugh at a 
Panhellenic meeting, where the council plans events and sets 
up for Recruitment week. 




lGo lGreeRs 



3LE TALK. The Interfraternity Council works as a whole to 

uss important Greek issues over a cafeteria meal during one of 

meetings. 

photo by: Sean Gilder 




CALLING 
S HOTS 



panhelleniclinterfratemity councils improve greek life 

By: Michelle Magee 




^ % 




what is the best accomplishment of the year? 



"I was fortunate enough to at- 
tend the National Panhellenic 
gathering, SEPC, this year, 
which gave me great ideas 
about how to improve 
Panhellenic's involvement on 
campus for next year." 

Melissa Guillory, Junior 



"The fact that IFC actually ex- 
ists!" 

Andrew Irby, Sophomore 



"Panhellenic produced two 
great fundraisers this year: the 
Irish kissing booth and a fabu- 
lous car wash. I really appreci- 
ate all the help that other mem- 
bers of the council gave me so 
that the events ran smoothly." 

Rebecca Soskin, Junior 





2000-2001 INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL. Advisor: Lori Bradshaw. 
Ben Appersen, Eric Camp, Colin Delaney, Brian Ehricht, Nathan Hill, Jay Hood, 
Andrew Irby, Jay Jamison, Ryan Kraemer, Brandon Larsen, Stuart Ponder, Scott 
Vanderlick. 



FASHION DO. Sophomore Rebekah 
Lagerson and Junior Rebecca Soskin model 
clothes that are appropriate for the first night 
of Recruitment week. 



Pa niiellenic/Inferfrateriiity Councils! 161 



A COM- 
M N 
BOND Big 
and Lil Sis- 
ters smile af- 
ter the Big 
Sis/Lil Sis 
ceremony in 
the fall. "I've 
enjoyed be- 
coming good 
friends with 
mybigsisthis 
year; she's 
the best!" 
says Fresh- 
man Kristen 
Paxson. 




TOP 5 

SERVICE PROJECTS 



1. Heartwalk 

2 4 Halloween carnival at Highland 

o Easter egg dying at Centenary's < 
Egg-stravaganza 

4. Career closet at the Easter egg hung 
5 ^ Take Back the Night 



what's your favorite 
part of greek life? 

"My favorite part of Chi 

Omega was initiation. I 

established a bond with my 

sisters that can never be 

broken." 

Saba Khonsari, Freshman 

"There were so many Chi-Os 

present at Take Back the 

Night that it proved how my 

sisters are not only there for 

me, but how they are there 

for all women." 
Elizabeth Pitts, Freshman 




SPRING 2001 FORMAL Fresh- 
man Kathryn Ramey, Junior Ashley 
Gaines, ana Senior Ashley Knecht pose 
for a family picture. "Formal was great, 
and it was so good to have our family 
back together," says Knecht. 



KARAOKE ANYONE? Freshmen 
Esther Seitz and Rachel Ryan, Sopho- 
mores Liz Daughenbaugh and Jessie 
Miller, and Juniors Heather Butler and 
Becky Soskin take a break from dancing 
at the Theta Chi swap. "The swap was 
wonderful; my sisters sang "Happy Birth- 
day" karaoke style to me, says Seitz. 




I62[£reeks_ 



BID DAY 2000. New Members smile for a picture after running down the 
hill. This year Chi Omega added 22 fabulous girls to its chapter. "Bid Day was 
very special because I became part of a new family," says Freshman Lindsey 
Garner. 



photo by: Liz Daughenbaugh 




LLrlDlrll-7 



a 



NMD 



.L 



chi omega: iota gamma chapter 

By: Liz Daughenbaugh 



MEMBERS 

President: 

Ashley Gaines 

Vice President: 

Laura Lindsay 

Treasurer: 

Sarah Everett 

New Member Educator: 

Mandy Yearwood 

Personnel: 

Linda Milhollon 

Recruitment Chair: 

Liz Daughenbaugh 

Panhellenic Delegates: 

Amy Calvert 

Rebekah Lagerson 

Brittney Anderson, Monica Ander- 
son, Jana Beckett, Abbey 
Broussard, Blair Bryson, Merrick 
Buchanan, Rachel Buchanan, 
Heather Butler, Lana Cheatwood, 
Allison Courville, Dayna Edwards, 
Heidi Fahrenholtz, Christy Finch, 
Michelle Finch, Monica Ford, Claire 
Galloway, Lindsey Garner, Krystil 
Garrett, Magan Graham, Julie 
Greene, Jessica Haley, Laura 
Harper, Gentry Haughton, Lind- 
say Holman, Lauren Jackson, 
Amanda Kay, LeAnn Kay, Pepper 
Kauffman, Ashley Knecht, Susan 
King, Saba Khonsari, Elizabeth 
Lecky, Megan McWaters, Jennifer 
Maynard, Aimee Miceli, Jessie 
Miller, Melanie Moeck, Mindy 
Montgomery, Maria Moores, 
Carolyn Morris, Lisa Mull, Ashly 
Neal, Virginia O'Donnell, Kristen 
Paxson, Emily Pinnix, Elizabeth 
Pitts, Lisa Polak, Katie Poole, Jen- 
nifer Powers, Emily Primeaux, 
Amanda Lee Rankin, Kathryn 
Ramey, Martha Rice, Shannon 
Richardson, Niki Roberts, Tasha 
Rogers, Rachel Ryan, Esther 
Seitz, MargoShideler, Emily Smith, 
Becky Soskin, Lauren Stallings, 
Stasia Taylor, Janelle Thibault, 
Callie Threadgill, Anna Walls, Jen- 
nifer West, Mallory Woods, Lind- 
say Yearwood 



which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"Formal was our best party be- 
cause we had a lot of fun, and it 
was the most elegant party of 
the year." 
Claire Galloway, Sophomore 



"Crush was my favorite party 
because there were more boys 
than girls." 
Krystil Garrett, Sophomore 



"I had a great time with my date 
atYippee-l-OChiO." 

Ashly Neal, Freshman 




YIPPEE-l-0 CHI O! Sophomores Jessica Haley, Liz 
Daughenbaugh, and Stasia Taylor relax on the rocking chairs at 
dinner before Fall theme party. 



THETA CHI SWAP. Freshmen Jennifer Maynard and 
Michelle Finch, Sophomore Krystil Garrett, and Juniors Mindy 
Montgomery, Heidi Fahrenholtz, Aimee Miceli, and Christy 
Finch have a blast at the Theta Chi swap. "I had a lot of fun 
at the swap singing karaoke," says Miceli. 



CM omega |i63 




( 



J 



ZTA'S ANGELS. ZTA sisters clown around after a meeting and strike a 
pose resembline Charlie's Angels. The ZTAs adopted a Charlie's Angels 
theme for Prospective Weekend, with the slogan that states, "Letters mean 

nothing if you don't have the girls to back them up." 

photo submitted by: Robyn Marchand 



zeta tau alpha: beta iota chapter 

By: Robyn Marchand 



which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"The ZTA event that was a blast 
this year was our Bid Day tripto 
Hot Springs. We had a great time 
traveling down there and get- 
ting to know our newest sisters. 
Not to mention the sun, the boat 
rides, floating, the great food, 
the sisterhood, and who can 
forget the crazy carousel!" 
Elizabeth Quillen, Junior 



"The Sandal Scandal Date Dash 
was the most fun party of the 
year! We chalked the campus at 
midnight the night before and 
tied flipflops to everyone's door 
knobs. The next morning all of 
us had to dash for a date!" 

Karen Loftin, Junior 



"Spring Formal was my favorite 
event because we all got to get 
dressed up and look like fairy 
princesses!" 

Allison Kana, Sophomore 




ZTA GODDESS. Junior Laura £J 
Slack dances with Junior TKE mem- 
ber Bryan Ehricht. Slack and Ehricht 
were named Greek Goddess and BID DAY BLISS. The ZTAs crowd together with their new members to celebrate their Bid 
God during the Greek Week festivi- Day success. The ZTAs celebrated themes of lifelong sisterhood and friendship throughout 
ties. Rush and Bid Day, not to mention the rest of the year. 



MEMBERS 

President: 

Valerie Curtis (fall) 

Elizabeth Quillen (spring) 

Vice President I: 

Evette Barnes (fall) 

Yvonne Juneau (spring) 

Vice President II 

(New Member Coordinator): 

Elizabeth Quillen (fall) 

Shannon Guzovich (spring) 

Vice President III 

(Rush Chair): 

Dana Beyert (fall) 

Karen Loftin (spring) 

Secretary: 

Karen Loftin (fall) 

Nikki Jarratt (spring) 

Treasurer: 

Laura Slack (fall) 

Jennie Webb (spring) 

Rituals: 
Sarah Knighton (fall) 
Mariah Mayo (spring) 

Historian: 

Sarah Bracken (fall) 

Robyn Marchand (spring) 

Panhellenic: 

Beth Tener (fall) 

Melissa Guillory (spring) 

Scholarship: 

Yvonne Juneau (fall) 

Ceci Salinas (spring) 

Jessica Bailey, Kristin Ballard, Erin 
Barr, Sharon Basham, Barbara 
Bearden, Lisa Bishop, Crystal 
Burkhart, Erin Kate Cassiere, 
Vanessa Curtis, Maura Dees, Nikki 
Doughty, Kacee Dunaway, Brandee 
Dykes, Sarah Earhart, Elva Ezernak, 
Jessica Fant, Katie Fullbright, Amy 
Gardner, Jennifer Hamblin, Jamie 
Hearne, Delanie Hebert, Lauren 
Herndon, Val Hueber, Virginia 
Jones, Allison Kana, April Landry, 
Aimee Lange, Christin Lawrence, 
Heather Lindsey, Ivy McLemore, 
Michelle Magee, Ursula Maroski, 
Christy Melton, Brittani Murphy, Dani 
Murphy, Amanda Mustin, Celeste 
Nash, Wendy Paul, Rebecca 
Pistorius, Heather Ratzburg, Lee 
Reynolds, Amanda Rundell, Randi 
Smith, Sarah Stringer, Danika 
Swoyer, Kathryn Thompson, Montie 
Thomas, Nicole Vaughn, Ellie 
Wallace, Julie Watkins, Erin Watson, 
Jennifer Watson, Katie White 



I64[£reete 



TOP ^ 

SERVICE PROJECTS 

\ Assisting with Race for the Cure. 



2 Making Valentine's Day cards for nursing home 
* residents. 

3. Canned food/toiletry drive for those in need. 



4. Distributing shower cards promoting breast 
cancer awareness. 

5 Assisting with Trick or Terror for the neigh- 
* borhood kids. 




ALOHA NEW 
MEMBERS! 
Junior Delanie 
Hebert and Sopho- 
mores Crystal 
Burkhart and 
Robyn Marchand 
welcome Fresh- 
man Vanessa 
Curtis to the ZTA 
sisterhood on Bid 
Day. Hebert and 
Burkhart kept the 
chapter enter- 
tained during Rush 
week with their 
crazy comedy rou- 
tines. 




what's your favorite 
part of greek life? 

"My favorite part of Greek life is the 

sisterhood/brotherhood that is 

developed between the members 

of each organization. Not only are 

there bonds created just within a 

particular sorority or fraternity, but 

each group creates a link with each 

other. The memories that are 

created within my Greek life at 

Centenary will stay with me long 

after I have left." 
Robyn Marchand, Sophomore 




WHAT DOLLS! Junior Lauren Herndon 
and Freshman Maura Dees take a break 
from dancing at the Guys and Dolls Theme 
Party. 

r FORMAL FUN. ZTA sisters gather 

g together for a traditional dance floor photo 

during formal. The girls love to get out on the 

dance floor together during the song "We 

are Family." 



Zeta Tan Alplia |1G5 



HANGING 

WITH THE 
DYS KA mem- 
bers stand to- 
getherfora picture 
of all the guys. The 
members worked 
hard this year to 
riase money for 
MDA and volun- 
teer for other city 
programs. 




what's your favorite 
part of greek life? 



"Whaaat.Jt's off da'heezie. 



Chad Sepulvado, Freshman 




AMERICAN BEAUTIES. The ladies dress in their Old 
South wardrobes for the annual Old South ceremony. The event 
is anticipated by students as they line up in front of James Hall 
to see the presentation. 

OH WHAT A NIGHT! Stag Night comes to a close as Senior 
Jason Wingert and Freshman Will Lara try to keep the party 
going. 



TOP 3 

SERVICE PROJECTS 

1. MDA Fundraiser, Lock-In 
2 Adopt-a-Highway Program 



o Meritor Program 




!66 lGreeks 



.EADING MEN. Freshman Chad Sepulvado, who was 
issisted by Junior Nathan Hill, acts as Master of Ceremony 
or the 53rd annual Old South presentations. 

photo by: Ben Cunningham 






O 



f 



MEMBERS 

President: 

Nathan Hill 

Vice President: 

Chad Sepulvado 

Recording Secretary: 

Eric Camp 

Corresponding Secretary: 

Stuart Ponder 

Historian: 

Robert Savage 

Treasurer: 

Matthew Smitherman 

Parliamentarian: 

Jeremy Norwood 

Sergeant at Arms: 

Pete Raish 

Ritualist: 

Alex Lu 

Dave Campbell, Ben 

Cunningham, Brian Day, 

Will Lara, Joel Rice, Zack 

Salyer, Garrett Walker, 

Jason Wingert 




"Liu 



tRi 



kappa alpha: alpha iota chapter 

By: Robert Savage 



which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"Coyote KA: crop tops and 
leather pants! Who's complain- 
ing!?!" 

Pete Raish, Freshman 



"Bid Day because it was a lot of 
fun meeting everybody new." 

Will Lara, Sophomore 



"Coyote KA because I didn't get 
into any trouble, and the drama 
was low." 

Joel Rice, Senior 




GOOD THINGS COME TO THOSE WHO WAIT. The KA chapter lines COYOTE KA. If you ever saw the movie 

Coyote Ugly then you can see the theme 
up in front of James Hall and waits for their opportunity to present their individual behind this picture and some of the girls at 

dates at the Old South ceremonies. Coyote KA. 



Kappa Alpta |167 





INITIATION TIME. Fall pledges Justin Withrow, Chris 

Cefalu, Robert Brocato, Jeff Jacobie, and Ben Barst pose 

together in front of the Kappa Sigma house after theit 

initiation. 

photo by: Scott Vanderlick 



in 




kappa sigma: epsilon chapter 

By: Jeff Everson 



which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"I really enjoyed PJ Party be- 
cause I was comfortable in my 
attire; I sleep naked." 

David Castille, Senior 



"Everyone really had a really 
good time at Halloween Party 
all dressed up. We had superhe- 
roes, pregnant Nuns, Luke 
Skywalker, and I was the State 
Puff Marshmallow Man-fitting." 

Jay Jamison, Sophomore 



"I like Sig Sale because it gave 
me a chance to show all of the 
ladies what I am really made of." 

Eric Mayo, Junior 





CANYON CLIMBERS. Jay Jamison, Adam PARTYIN' AT PAT'S! Kappa Sigs and their dates enjoy a night of fun at 
Blancher, Ryan Kraemer, and Jeff Jacobie take Pat O'Brien's in New Orleans after their formal dinner, 
a break to catch their breath while hiking on a trip. 



MEMBERS 

GM: 

David Castille 

GP: 
Jeff Everson 

GMC: 

Travis Tate 

GS: 

Mark Simmons 

GT: 

Jay Jamison 

Guard 1: 

Adam Blancher 

Guard 2: 
Matt Hamilton 

Kyle Aaron, Ben Barst, 

Robert Brocato, Chris 

Cefalu, Jesse Cope, Jay 

Gant, Mitchell Glass, Jeff 

Jacobie, Todd Killen, 

Ryan Kraemer, Tom 

Louis, Eric Mayo, Owen 

Mogabgab, Landon 

Ogilvie, Jonathan 

Peterson, Brad Pinkston, 

Jeremy Radar, J.C. 
Stewart, Jeff Szot, Peter 

Talavera, Scott 

Vanderlick, Trey Wellborn, 

Justin Withrow. 

Faculty Advisor: 

Dr. Harold Christensen 

Alumnus Advisor: 

Derrick Daniels 



lG8lGreefo 



TOPS 

SERVICE PROJECTS 

\ Establishing Joe Dartois Memorial Patio. 



2 Allendale Clean Up with Shreveport Bossier Com- 
' munity Renewal. 

3. Race for the Cure-We helped set up and take down 
the race. 

4. Car Wash to raise money for Highland Center. 



5. 



Food Drive. 




HOT & 

NASTY. 
Stasia Tay- 
lor, Jana 
Beckett, Will 
Street, Bryn 
Burgess, 
L a n d o n 
Ogilvie, and 
David 
Castille look 
their best for 
Hot & Nasty. 




what's your favorite 
part of greek life 

"The brotherhood. I can count on my frater- 
nity for anything because I know that they 
are not just my friends, but my brothers." 
Brad Pinkston, Junior 

"I think that the brotherhood provides a very 
good environment to grow up in. College is 
a time to grow up, and having a group of 
people that you can count on makes the 
difficult times a whole lot easier." 
Mark Simmons, Senior 





#nl 


4f& - ( 


1 


47 '&"»'& f 


A 1 


l^iw*' * W%M$f< ■KhOHb 




,3§B»^ *f .^JwPSWlk. 









IN TOUCH WITH NATURE. Kappa Sigma 

3- brothers take some time out after the Homecoming 
o 

° Parade to pose with their friend the Kudu. 



I ALL DRESSED UP AND READY TO GO. 
3 Kappa Sigma brothers get all dressed up for the Chi 



g Omega Formal. 



Kappa Sigma | 169 



SPIRITED 
MEN. All the 
Tekesgoouttothe 
Gents basketball 
games to show 
their support for 
Horse [Brien 
Rabenhorst] and 
the team. Some- 
times they go a little 
overboard, as John 
Rabenhorst, 
Patrick McCuller, 
Casey Muller, John 
Grand, and Bran- 
don Thorn did on 
this day. 




TOP 5 

SERVICE PROJECTS 



^ Special Olympics 



2 Adopt-a-Highway 



3 Centenary Book Bazaar 



4 Shreve Memorial Library Book Sale 



CAB's Halloween and Easter events 



what's your favorite 
part of greek life? 

"Life long friendship, a special bond, and 

memories that will last forever. These are my 

favorite things about Greek life." 

Greg McGehee, Senior 

"The best part of Greek life is the good fun, 

great parties, and all the good guys." 

William Wells, Junior 




SWEET HEARTS. TKE members John Grand, Charlie Starnes, 
Chip LeDuff, Justin Beckham, Jean Ancelet, Sean Gilder, Colin 
Delaney, Patrick McCuller, Andrew Irby, and Brien Rabenhorst 
show their support for James Hall Council at their Valentine's Day 
Dance. 

HAVING A BALL. Tekes David McCormick, George Fine, 
Charlie Starnes, Bryan Ehricht, Stephan Cannon, David Pierce, 
Brandon Thorn, David Jones, Andrew Irby, John Rabenhorst, 
Justin Beckham, Patrick McCuller, Drew Sutton, and Justin Kirkes 
spend an evening of fun and dancing with the ZTAs at their annual 
formal. 




i7olGreeks 



STUDLY RELATIONS. The chapter sweetheart 
Nicole Vaughn and Evette Barnes surprise David McCormick 
at a ZTA theme party! 



photo by: David Maroski 




AU 



I 



gppg 




P51LO 



\ 



not for wealthy rank or honor, hut for personal 

worth & character 

By: Tau Kappa Epsilon 



MEMBERS 

President: 

Colin Delaney 

Vice President: 

Rob Rubel 

Treasurer: 

Bryan Ehricht 

Secretary: 

Paul Aucoin 

Historian: 

Drew Sutton 

Chaplin: 

Andrew Irby 

Sergeant-at-Arms: 

Brien Rabenhorst 

Chapter Educator: 

Will Wells 

John Grand 

Rush Chairman: 

Dawson Taylor 

Jean Ancelet, Nicholas 

Antoon, Justin Beckham, 

Doug Bryson, Stephan 

Cannon, Greg Coates, 

Byron Cockerham, 

George Fine, Eric 

Gardner, Sean Gilder, 

Jason Hoeltzel, David 

Jones, Justin Kirkes, Keith 

Lawson, Chip LeDuff, 

Larry Loocke, David 

McCormick, Patrick 

McCuller, Greg McGehee, 

Casey Muller, Corey 

Pavletich, David Pierce, 

John Rabenhorst, Charlie 

Starnes, Brandon Thorn, 

David Turnbull 



which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"Graveyard is awesome. We 
build a huge haunted house, 
and then we all get dressed up 
in costumes. Usually, we have a 
live band, and then we party 
the night away. It's fun to see 
everyone in costume; you have 
everything from Playboy bun- 
nies to cafeteria workers! It's the 
biggest party of the year!" 

Bryan Ehricht, Junior 



"For Toga, we decorate the 
house with ivy and laurel 
wreaths. We put on toags, and 
boy, there are some inventive 
ones! And we dance! That's my 
favorite part...l love to DANCE!" 

Nicholas Antoon, Freshman 



"Red Carnation Ball is the for- 
mal party we throw for our- 
selves. This is our weekend get- 
away vacation just before finals 
where we relax in the vacation 
city of our choice. Guys in tuxes, 
girls in formal dresses...we all 
get together and celebrate be- 
ing Tekes." 

Andrew Irby, Sophomore 




photo by: TKE 
FEELS LIKE OLD TIMES. After the annual Alumni Weekend football game, Teke members take a photo with their alumni 

on Hardin Field. 



Tan Kappa Epsilon 171 



BONDS 



BROTHERLY RELATIONS. Sophomore Walter 
Wooldridge and James Guillory, a Theta Chi from McNeese 
State, stand in front of a fighter jet at the Smithsonian during 



the summer. 



photo by: Theta Chi 



O 







u 




) 



theta chi brothers come together for a successful year 

By: Trey Reeme 




which event did you enjoy most and why? 



"Mafia was great as always! To 
see the alumni come in and par- 
ticipate makes all of us happy." 

Ben Apperson, Freshman 



"Rummage'N Reggaewascom- 
plete with the two-story water- 
fall, bamboo, some great mu- 
sic, and fun. It was the best party 
of the year." 

Walter Wooldridge, 
Sophomore 




DRESSED TO KILL. Sophomores Dan Duzan A! , nDccccn i in r- , « a .,, , , 

r ALL UHbobhU UP. Freshman Ben Apperson poses with guests at 

and Rebecca Melanson await the bus that will take 

the Mafia party, 
them to the Mafia party in November. 



MEMBERS 

President: 

Trey Reeme 

Vice-President: 

Dan Duzan 

Secretary: 

Walter Wooldridge 

Treasurer: 

Ben Apperson 



Josh Greer 



John Harper 



Jeremy Hernandez 



Jay Hood 



Brandon Larson 



i72 JGreeks 



TOPS 

SERVICE PROJECTS 

\ National Fraternity Project: American Red Cross 
Blood Drive. 

2 "Bethesda Cares" Project for the Homeless. 



3 , Holy Angels Project (worked with local Boy Scouts 
of America). 

4. Hosted Theta Chi Mid Year Leadership Conference. 



<5 Facilitated Regional Theta Chi Brotherhood Renewal 
* Retreat. 




PLAYING 
CATCH-UP. 
Alumnus broth- 
ers Clay 
Hargett, Justin 
Hayes, and 
T o r r e y 
Bertheau catch 
up with Theta 
Chi President 
Trey Reeme at 
Mafia. 




what's your 
favorite part 
or greek life? 

"My favorite part of Greek life is 
not the parties; it's knowing that 
like-minded people can have a 
good time while doing good for 
the campus and community." 
Trey Reeme, Junior 




POOL SHARK. "Ten in the corner." 
Sophomore Jeremy Hernandez calls his 
shot at the pool table as others look on 
on a cold Friday night in January. 

PARTY ANIMALS. Members, 
dates, and alums dance the night away 
at Mafia as the photographer hangs from 
the rafters. 



TtetaCM 1 173 



SHOWING AP- 
PRECIATION. 
Students in Dr. Fell's 
Literary Nonfiction 
class show apprecia- 
tion to the public for 
their support of Cen- 
tenary. 




m lAds/Index 






vr 




Y.« :i &v.v.*S 

■Hi 

' ; " '■■.■■■;''W 





S&v 








knows kind ^^ support 

By: Nikki Doughty 

As the midterms and presentations pile up on stu- 
dents all at once, they feel encouraged by all the support 
friends and family show them. A "you can do it" or a "you 
are so smart" can really go a long way. Several 
students' parents chose to honor the achievements 
their son or daughter has made throughout his/her 
college career, and those displays of appreciation can 
be found throughout this section. 

A major effort was made by the yearbook staff to 
include as many students as possible throughout the 
book. This was done with a Blacklist, which helped us 
keep track of how often a student was used in the book. 
After a student was featured a few times we tried to 
avoid using him/her. Of course, some students are so 
involved on campus that they are featured many times. 
We would like to congratulate Jean Ancelet for being the 
first person to be blacklisted! The names of students 
used in the book and the pages they can be found on are 
included in the index. 

Thanks to the support of parents and the campus and 
neighboring community, students are able to achieve 
great success in their valuable college days. On behalf 
of our students, thank you for your support. 




Divider 1 05 



Kijan rlaqGman Kijan Maqeman Kijan llageman Kqan lieigeman Kijan naqeman Kijan rlageman kijan Elageman 




Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emily Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu Elliott Emilu 




176 Ads 



(j7reg Peco Kjreq Peco vjreq Peco C^peq Peco (c7Peq Peco lj7Peq Peco V7Peq Peco (j7peq Peco Cj7Peq Pgco Cr7peq Peco 



Congratulations 
Greg Peco 



Greg, 

God has truly blessed us having you in our lives . You 
have given us so much joy and happiness through the 
years. Watching you achieve the early developmental 
milestones was fascinating. Watching you at Christmas 
as you anxiously awaited Santas visit was simply 
delightful. Watching you give hugs and good-night 
kisses warmed our hearts. Watching your success in 
school made us feel fortunate . Watching you grow into 
a fine young man makes us very proud. We will 
continue to be watching with admiration and pride as 
you successfully achieve your goals in life . We love you 
very much. "Two-ten." 

Love, Mom, Dad, and Mary Claire 




„~-. 



Voncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin Yoncopin 



THE YEARBOOK STAFF WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE OR 
ORGANIZATIONS FOR ANY ASSISTANCE THEY MAY HAVE GIVEN THE YEARBOOK STAFF 

THIS YEAR: 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE 

DAVID BAKER 

DR LISA NICOLETTI 

DR BRUCE ALLEN 

DR FLECK 

DR SCHWAB 

REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

PAYROLL OFFICE 

STUDENT LIFE OFFICE 

CAMPUS POST OFFICE 

ALUMNI OFFICE 

MARK MILLER 

KRISTINE JENKINS 

CENTENARY ACTIVITIES BOARD 

EVAN MCCLANAHAN 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

ALL THE STUDENTS AND FACULTY 



Ads | m 



cJett Lvepsori Jett tvepson Jett Lvepson Jett tvepson Jett tvepson Jett tverson Jett tvepson Jett tvcpson Jett tvepson Jett t\ 




_Li /'\,,. 


















\ , 1 




HltL 


■w r JH f 




ilP 9 ^ 






\ 


' / 


\ 


X 


1 


* 




i 


. 







-I 








w [Ms_ 



Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parker Lee Parkt 



vjUSSATO-ATIOj, 









8 









You've come a long 

way from a little boy 
to a grown man. We 
are very prowd of you. 

Keep reaching for 
your dreams and 
continue to grow 

wiser. 




Love Mom 8r Dad, Harriet, 
MawMaw Sr PawPaw, 
Mary 8r George, Joice, 
Estelle, David Sr Stacey, 
Stephen, Marc, GrandMa 
Ellen, and a host of other 
people. 



Oessions Diane Oessions Diane Oessions Diane Oessions Diane Oessions Diane Oessions Diane oessions Diane Oessioi 









hLX^^I 


IB^H^V *PH 






|JjljHy'/;;¥g 






*' ll 




^*v£fr 












>:■:]''] y c.y 


, . 


■ 






" 


■ ' : 






^^Syo*' 










. •, ' 






;.'. : |l| 




1 1 1 




"^flSS 










??:'?, V>V - > ' - 









Blane, 

Another good "close" 

and a great "start" 

for the next game in life! 

Thanks for the memories! 

We love you, 
Mom and Dad 






www* mm "* i 




Ads 179 



Mama Oaucier Maria oaucier Maria Oaucier Maria Oaucier Maria oaucier Maria Oauciep Maria Oaucier Maria oa 







m < ■ I 1 






Jlai, ^eli^Uacuui^i! 

Qltickuuindke! 

Ql Pabaliend,! 

"Mabia Maudes " 

W&dduude dsdutatumd- fob a w&bld 

traveled Acludab. Ijowi 4McceM. and 

acJuev&nenbi abe oub %#e JlaffineAA- 

U/e abe mtet pboud o^ oub uMmdebfol 

dawCfkteA, and fow&iite tiiteb. B>eii o^ 

wMneA fob ifowi foiube. 

JlovaMom & jbad, 
Cody, & famed. 




180 Ads 



Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s Leon s 



JOHN MONTELEPRE, JR. 
BRANDON ROWELL, MGR. 



318^868-3237 




L,MGI 

L 



eon s 

HICKORY-SMOKED 

TURKEYS 
HAMS 

AND PIT BARBECUE 



CATERING • RESTAURANT • DELI • PARTY TRAYS 
303 EAST KINGS HWY. • ACROSS FROM TV 3 



Alison v^ulvep Alison Oulvep Alison L^ulver Alison L^ulx 



um^v^acc(mvpAJAMe<l Wen£>eacUe<ll(^ipM- 

a/ieamd- come, bmz. And, w^Umke^ajj(yi 
mom, altAM2u& moauAe^ we> keliedte, m 44&u>. 
Gona/uzlidlatixuiA, 



Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert Jason Wingert 





"Try not to become a 

man of success but 

rather try to become a 

man of value." 

Albert Einstein 

We are so proud ofyou 

and love^ou! 
Mom, Dad, and Debbie 




Ads181 



?lle C^ockepha 



SUCCESS 

As ijou know the poad To success is not stpaiqht. 1 here is 
a cupve called tailupe, a loop called contusion, speed bumps 
called Tpiends, ped liqhts called enemies, caution lights called 

tamilij. 

You maij have tlats called jobs, but it ijou have a spape 

called Uetepmination, an enqine called Pepsevepance, 

insupance called laith, a dpivep called V7od, ljou will make it 

to a place called oUCCLoo. 

I hepe is no doubt ljou possess all ot these qualities. 

L^onqpatulations 

Jenelle Ueanna v^ockepham 

Seniop 3001 

ALL CUP LCVE 



Mopton I homas liopton I homas Llopton I h( 



Mom, Uad-oteve, Kan 
Youp Lovinq lamilq 
and Ipiends 



( e 




Coiijiraliilations Thomas Horton 

WE WISH YOU SUCCESS 
AS YOUR CAREER UNFURLS, 

OUR ONLY REQUEST IS: 

DON'T BLOW UP THE WORLD! 

Love-Your Family 



oplon l nomas 



llopton I homas floptc 



Morton I r 



nomas I lorTon I homas 



llopton I homas Morton I homas llortc 




Congratulations, 

Speedy! 
I'm proud of you, 
Pawpaw Horton 



182 |Ads 



rloptor 



rlorton I nomas floPK 



rlorton I nor 




CONGRATULATIONS, THOMAS! 
THE BOY WONDER HAS BECOME SUPERMAN 

LOVE , MOM AN D DAD 



* 



ids 183 



A 



Aaron, Kyle 14, 62, 149, 168 

Ackerman, Elizabeth 115 

Alcorn, Rachel95, 146, 147 

Alexander, Bryan 50, 66 

Alexander, Marcia M. 115 

Alibalic, Jasmin 95 

Alibalic, Jazz 66, 106 

Allen, Bruce 119 

Allen, Garrett 100 

Allen, Jesse 144 

Allen, Jimmy 90 

Alsup, Traci 112 

Amidon, Gisela 112 

Ancelet, Jean 1, 8, 12, 15, 26, 51, 62, 90, 170, 171 

Anderson, Brittney 95, 163, 168, 169 

Anderson, Monica 77, 163 

Andress, Will 43, 125 

Antoon, Nick 103 

Appersen, Benl61, 172 

Arredondo, Clarisse 138 

Ashley, Caleb 34, 106 

Asplin, Karin 134, 135 

Atamah, Kevin 136 

Aucoin, Paul 18, 30, 35, 47, 100, 171 



B 



Baiamonte, Maria 64, 66, 90 
Bailey, Jessica 164 
Bailey, Julia 67, 74, 95 
Baker, Ashlei 35 
Ballard, Kristin 64, 164 
Banks, Joy 65, 106, 150, 151 
Bankston, Emily 154, 155 
Bareikis, Grace 116 
Bareikis, Robert P. 121 
Barkley, Andrew 107 
Barnes, Evette 91, 164 
Barr, Erin 109, 164 
Barrett, Mary 122 
Barry, Michael 144 
Barst, Ben 168 
Bartholomew, Donna 114 
Basham, Sharon 84, 93, 94, 164 
Bateman, Carol 118 
Bato, Jennifer 77, 107 
Beacham, Justin 77 
Beaird, Bobby 190 
Beaird, Robert 100 
Bearden, Barbra 107, 164 
Bechham, Jason 84 
Beck, Alison 95 
Beck, Beth 100 
Becker, Roger 115 
Beckett, Jana 163, 169 
Beckham, Justin 14, 94, 170, 171 
Belcher, Paul 113 
Bell, Lewis 34, 90, 113 
Bender, Carol 113 
Bennett, Sofia 115 
Benton, Carter 14, 45 
Beyert, Dana 22, 25, 51, 96, 164 
Biamonte, Marie 9, 26 
Bieler, David 64, 122 
Bigler, Lyndsay 133 
Bishop, Lisa 42, 164 
Blakeney, Ernest W., Jr. 
Blancher, Adam 24, 95, 168 
Boltinghouse, Amy 113 
Bones, Mr. 158 
Bossier, Sherilyn 107, 146 
Boudreaux, Nikki 107, 146 
Bowman, Katie 133 
Boyter, Mime 100 
Bracken, Sarah 48, 164 
Bradshaw, Lori 41, 161 



120 



Brammer, Nancy 13 

Brayford, Susan 50 

Breitschopf, Justin 107 

Brocato, Robert 168 

Broussard, Abbey 19, 63, 64, 163 

Broussard, Jeffery 107 

Brown, Chris 77 

Brown, Emily 138 

Brown, Jameelah 100 

Brown, Jeremiah 130 

Brown, Lara 16, 37, 133 

Brown, Sarah 132, 133 

Bruce, Clint 77,79 

Brumley, Patsy 118 

Bruner, Anne-Marie 113 

Bryan, Erin 25, 62, 66, 67, 74 

Bryan, Lauren 100 

Bryson, Blair 48, 163 

Bryson, Doug 24, 28, 67, 87, 100, 171 

Buchanan, Merrick 95, 141, 163 

Buchanan, Rachel 163 

Buhl, Robbie 144, 145, 149 

Bukoff, Ron 40, 46, 47, 115, 125 

Burkhart, Crystal 164, 165 

Burnham, Jason 95 

Burris, Sandy 138, 139 

Busieck, Bob 62, 64, 127 

Butler, Heather 148, 149, 162, 163 

Byrne, Aine 38, 39 

Byrne, Cathleen 146 



C 



Cage, Angela 43, 65, 150, 151 

Calhoun, Bob 48 

Calvert, Amy 95, 160, 163 

Camp, Eric 160, 161, 167 

Campbell, Dave 90, 167 

Campbell, Harley 115 

Campbell, Jodi 40, 46, 47, 123 

Cannon, Stephan 170, 171 

Carbone, Lisa 146 

Cardone, Tony 107, 144 

Carr, Jacqueline 49, 95, 98 

Carroll, Jay 95 

Carter, Crystal 9, 18, 62, 66, 68, 77, 78, 103 

Cash, Allison 138 

Cash, Artis 107 

Cassidy, Kevin 100, 144 

Cassiere, Erin Kate 164 

Castalanas, Christian 149 

Castille, David 168, 169 

Castillo, Marc 130 

Cavalier, Julie 148, 149 

Cazes, G.B. 130, 131 

Cefalu, Chris 168 

Chambers, Josh 95, 130 

Chapman, Susan 118 

Chatelain, Anna 68, 77, 78 

Chatelain, Benedict 76, 77 

Cheatwood, Lana 35, 163 

Chevalier, Sharon 115 

Chism, Darkus 99, 136, 137 

Christensen, Harold 119, 168 

Clark, J. Stephen 121 

Clark, Justin 130, 131 

Cloud, Marcie 100 

Coates, Greg 34, 171 

Cockerham, Byron 171 

Cockerham, Jenelle 90, 133, 182 

Coffman, Katie 7 

Comeau, Michael 133 

Cooper, Katie 100, 133 

Cooper, Peggy 114 

Cope, Jesse 168 

Couch, Amanda 107, 135 

Coughenour, Amy 64, 68 

Courville, Allison 67, 160, 163 

Cowden, John 42 

Cowden, Lisa 44 

Cox, Stacy 138 



184 Index 



Coyle, Naomi 121 

Crain, Jennifer 65, 150, 151 

Crawford, Laura 125 

Crider, Dawn 133 

Crowley, Tim 13, 113 

Culver, Allison 181 

Cummings, Keturah 77 

Cunningham, Ben 167 

Curtis, Valerie 91, 164 

Curtis, Vanessa 8, 65, 107, 150, 151, 160, 164 

Cutburth, Adrienne 138 



D 



Daigle, Ashlie 8, 23, 29, 49, 79, 84, 105, 107 

Danieles, Julie 138, 139 

Daniels, Derrick 168 

Daries, Cheyenne 107, 146 

Daughenbaugh, Liz 1, 3, 23, 42, 160, 162, 163 

Davenport, Dan 95, 144 

Davis, Barbarall9 

Davis, Lauren 107 

Dawson, Nikki 135 

Day, Brian 167 

Day, Heather 101, 107 

Day, Rachael 15, 67, 100, 105 

Dean, Ronald E. 125 

Dees, Maura 107, 164, 165 

Delaney, Colin 11, 22, 41, 51, 161, 170, 171 

DelCastillo, Natasha 100 

Demerath, Loren 127 

Derrick, Chris 115 

Dewitt, Sarah 133 

Dickson, Grace 26, 77 

Disko,Jeff 130 

Doughty, Nikki 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 36, 40, 41, 45, 46, 59, 60, 

64, 69, 70, 72, 86, 89, 95, 97, 106, 129, 136, 138, 154, 159, 164, 191 

Ducote, Dominique 77 

Dufour, Adaml58 

Dunaway, Kacee 164 

Dunn, Brandi 140, 141 

Duplantis, Melissa 9, 62 

Duranski, Mark 144, 145 

Duty, Reese 107, 136 

Duzan, Dan 100, 142, 172 

Dykes, Brandee 7, 107, 164 



E 



Earhart, Sarah 7, 107, 164 

Earles, Amanda 44 

Edwards, Dayna 9, 163 

Ehricht, Bryan 22, 92, 161, 170, 171 

Ellenburg, Janna 90 

Elliott, Emily 90, 176 

English, Horace C. 125 

Evans, Glenn 133 

Evans, Samantha 77 

Everett, Sarah 95, 163 

Everson, Jeff 77, 168, 178 

Ezernak, Elva 164 



F 



Fahrenholtz, Heidi 26, 62, 95, 99, 102, 103, 163 

Faith, Michelle 113 

Fant, Jessica 24, 90, 164 

Farrow, Andrew 95 

Fell, Katherinell2 

Ferrara, Davon 107 

Fields, Lillian 90 

Fields, Sherricka 107 

Finch, Christy 9, 34, 62, 64, 66, 94, 95, 163 

Finch, Michelle 163 

Fine, George 170, 171 

Fisher, Joshua 100 

Fleishman, Shannon 146, 147 



Folmer, Ginger D. 127 

Fontenot, Chris 95, 98 
Ford, Monica 163 
Forster, Kayla 138, 139 
Fowler, Jason 95, 130 
Fraser, Catherine 112 
Fraser, Helen 100 
Frederick, Maria 154, 155 
Frias, Jaime 133 
Fulco, Buck 154 
Fullbright, Katie 101, 104, 164 
Furr, Katie 14, 40, 62, 67, 90 



G 



Gaines, Ashley 22, 162, 163 

Gale, Michael 21, 136, 137 

Gallion, Pat 112 

Galloway, Claire 43, 100, 163 

Game, Lisa 6, 13, 62, 67, 81, 100, 108 

Gant, Crystal 100 

Gant,Jay 168 

Gant, Takeo 138 

Gardner, Amy 160, 164 

Gardner, Eric 24, 40, 77, 90, 171 

Garner, Lindsey 23, 163 

Garrett, Krystil 22, 26, 48, 100, 101, 105, 163 

Garza, Dani 71 

Gayer, Danielle 100 

Gedeon, Jordan 24 

Geihsler, Rebecca 30, 90, 91 

Gewin, Marc 12, 102 

Gilder, Sean 2, 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 36, 37, 40, 41, 60, 

61, 63, 68, 69, 72, 73, 84, 86, 87, 91, 96, 98, 106, 134, 135, 136, 161, 170, 171 

Gillett, Meagan 9, 47, 62, 66, 77 

Gilliam, Bobby 144 

Gillilan, Teresa 77, 101 

Gipson, Jennifer 64 

Glass, Mitchell49, 107, 168 

Golas, Suzie 14, 100, 152 

Graham, Lavashia 107, 135 

Graham, Magan 63, 141, 163 

Grand, Elliott 107 

Grand, John 42, 52, 170, 171 

Greene, Julie 95, 163 

Greenwood, Scott 14, 41, 42 

Greer, Josh 142, 143, 172 

Gregory, Gene 113 

Gremillion, Anne 19 

Grenda, B.J. 95. 144 

Grosz, Gay 125 

Gruettner, Mark M. 121 

Gruettner, Pam 99, 101 

Grunes, Eric 115 

G runes, Judith 115 

Grunes, Rodney 42, 123 

Guadalupe, Cristina 101 

Guillory, Melissa 95, 160, 161, 164 

Gunderson, Brandy 62, 64, 132, 133 

Guzovich, Shannon 27, 64, 164 



H 



Haas, Jessica 99, 101, 107, 146, 149 

Haeuser, Justin 166 

Hageman, Ryan 144, 145, 176 

Hakola, Lina 141 

Hale, Angela 90 

Haley, Jessica 100, 105, 163 

Hall, Michael 107 

Hamblin, Jennifer 7, 23, 101, 104, 107, 164 

Hamilton, Matt 168 

Hammett, Jonathan 6, 77, 100 

Hampton, Stephen 107 

Handley, Scott 77 

Handy, Casey 144, 145 

Hardeman, Anne-Sophie 38, 39 

Hardy, Bill 141 

Harper, John 142, 143, 172 

Harper, Laura 7, 9, 23, 65, 150, 151, 163 



Index 185 



Harper, Michael 77 

Harris, Warren 136, 137 

Hason, Mohammid 149 

Haughton, Gentry 9, 163 

Hawkins, Jennifer 38, 39, 69, 84, 85, 98, 99, 101, 102, 104, 105, 107, 146 

Haves, Debbie 118 

Head, Derrick 66, 124 

Hearne, Jamie 48, 90, 164 

Hearnsberger, Whitney 95 

Hebert, Delanie 8, 22, 23, 39, 95, 109, 152, 164, 165 

Hebert, Talia 107 

Heinrich, Laurie 100 

Hendricks, Chad 142 

Hendricks, Jeff 68, 83 

Hennington, David 112 

Henry, Mark 15 

Hernandez, Jeremy 172 

Hernandez, Sue 42, 121 

Herndon, Lauren 25, 65, 67, 69, 75, 151, 164, 165 

Herrold, Dawn 90 

Hicks, Mike 144, 145 

Hill, Nathan 161, 167 

Hitt, Carolyn 112 

Hoaas, David 119 

Hobbs, Kim 112 

Hoeltzel, Jason 90, 93, 148, 149, 171 

Holland, Liz 100, 154 

Holman, Lindsay 90, 163 

Holmes, Nikki 118 

Hood, Jay 48, 142, 161, 172 

Hooper, DeMario 136 

Hooper, Don 127 

Horak, Sally 125 

Horton, Shelley 108 

Horton, Thomas 71, 77, 90, 182, 183 

Hoskins, Nancy 133 

Howell, Kate 77, 108 

Hueber, Lindsey 64 

Hueber, Val 164 

Huffman, Eric 86 

Hundemer, Thomas 125 

Hunter, Ashley 191 

Hunter, Tranisha 101 



Jones, Jed 130, 133 

Jones, Virginia 102,149, 164 

Julie Greene 77 

Juneau, Yvonne 7, 8, 15, 62, 66, 67, 69, 95, 164 



I 



Ickes, Josh 144 

Ilic, Miroslav 90, 136 

Ingram, Janet 113 

Ingrim, Zachary 108 

Inman, D'Ahn 154, 155 

Irby, Andrew 27, 161, 170, 171 

Isaac, Carlos 15, 130 

Isaacs, Edwin 90 

Isaacs, Scott 44 

Ivey, Preston 130, 131 

Ivory, Charles 130, 131 



I 



Jackson, Christopher 95 

Jackson, Jennifer 90 

Jackson, Kristy 100, 106 

Jackson, Lauren 146, 148, 149, 163 

Jacobie, Jeff 100, 168 

Jacobsen, Ann-Katrine 38, 39 

Jahnke, Jamie 108 

Jamison, Jay 100, 161, 168 

Janbaz, Ryan 130 

Jarratt, Nikki 164 

Jay, Chris 66, 77 

Jett, Tricia 108 

Johnson, C.J. 14 

Johnson, DeAndre 101 

Johnson, Kevin 22, 136 

Johnson, Neil 18, 19, 40, 119 

Johnson, Tomieca 52, 67, 71, 74, 75, 77, 85, 95 

Jones, David 77, 100, 170, 171 



K 



Kamberi, Laurie 108 

Kana, Allison 35, 94, 101, 106, 108, 164 

Kaufman, Pepper 1, 15, 87, 94, 95, 163 

Kay, Amanda 163 

Kay, LeAnn 163 

Khonsari, Saba 105, 108, 162, 163 

Killen, Todd 46, 96, 168 

Killian, Jerry Don 90 

King, Sarah 67, 96 

King, Susan 48, 163 

Kintner, Vicki 14, 23, 27, 64, 65, 151 

Kirkes, Justin 22, 77, 84, 96, 108, 170, 171 

Klingler, Stacey 96, 133 

Knecht, Ashley 2, 8, 9, 10, 11, 15, 22, 23, 24, 27, 30, 31, 34, 35, 43, 45, 48, 

49, 52, 60, 62, 63, 64, 66, 69, 71, 74, 75, 90, 94, 106, 144, 145, 149, 161, 162, 

163 

Knighton, Sarah 104, 164 

Koehn, Jennifer 146 

Koehn, Lauren 147 

Kowaleski, Lory 146 

Kraemer, Ryan 102, 160, 161, 168 

Kress, Dana 2, 121 

Kulosa, Bonnie 141 



L 



Labor, Kyle 115 

LaCreem, Bambi 27 

Lagerson, Rebekah 9, 160, 161, 163 

Lagerson, Sarah 9 

Lambert, Therese 116 

Landry, April 108, 152, 164 

Lange, Aimee 36, 88, 109, 160, 164 

Lansdale, Jordan 24, 146, 147 

Lara, Will 166, 167 

Larned, Keeley 43, 65, 151 

Larson, Brandon 62, 102, 161, 172 

Larson, Susan 79, 146, 147, 148, 149 

Lawrence, Christin 96, 164 

Lawson, Brand on53, 102 

Lawson, Keith 39, 42, 68, 92, 171 

LeBlanc, Amanda 96, 146 

Lecky, Elizabeth 94, 96, 163 

LeCount, Brooke 35 

LeDuff, Chip 12, 22, 45, 53, 96, 170, 171 

Lee, John 130 

Lee, Randy 136 

Lee, Sun-Hee 42,96 

Lefevers, Vicki 91 

Leger, Travis 10, 11, 96, 130 

Lehmann, Michael 130 

Leick, Todd 109 

Leuck, Beth 1 

Ley, Drew 109 

Lhotsky, Janna 138 

Liesman, Dorothy 116 

Lindahl, Michael 18, 22, 103, 104 

Lindsay, Laura 2, 65, 96, 151, 163 

Lindsey, Heather 109, 164 

Lindsey, Heather, 133 

Lisantti, Jerry 17, 41, 126 

Loftin, Karen 97, 160, 164 

Long, Michelle 45, 97 

Loocke, Larry 49, 90, 171 

Lott, Stephanie 45 

Louis, Tom 97, 168 

Louwien, April 109 

Lu, Alex 166, 167 

Lucena, Nate 104 



i86 lMex 



M 



N 



! Magee, Michelle 12, 13, 16, 34, 61, 62, 69, 91, 108, 109, 130, 135, 160, 161, 

| 164 

| Marchand, Robyn 64, 102, 164, 165 

i Maroski, Ursula 146, 164 

i Martin, Ron 120 

j Martucci, Shanah97 

I Masterson, Paul 39, 102 

j Mathis, Lance 144 

i Maynard, Jennifer 101, 105, 109, 163 

j Mayo, Eric 130, 168 

! Mayo, Mariah 97, 164 

! McAbee, Nathan 102, 130, 131 

I McCann, Ed 144 

I McCarty, Lori 112 

1 McClanahan, Evan 78, 79, 90 

! McClung, Luke 77, 82, 83 

! McCollum, Ronnie 17, 23, 136 

i McCormick, Dave 11, 13, 22, 23, 43, 53, 90, 103, 170, 171 

McCuller, Patrick 93, 94, 109, 170, 171 

McDonald, Cody 34 

McDonald, Roshanda 98 
! McDonald, Valerie 6, 109, 142 
1 McDowell, Mimi 112 

McFarland, Krissi 135 

McGehee, Greg 90, 91, 170, 171 

McGuire, Mike 15, 130 

Mcintosh, Glenn 115 

Mclntyre, Eric 72, 125 
I McKay, Katie 85, 93 

McKenna, Maureen 16, 40, 121 

Mckim, Ursula 64 

McKinley Cota 77 

McKinney, Alfred L. 124 

McKnight, Bianca 66, 70, 71 

McLemore, Ivy 64, 164 

McMullin, Corey 67, 74, 77, 84, 97, 103 

McMurry, Abby 9 

McQueen, Aimee80, 141, 142 

McWaters, Megan 163 

Meinen, Katie 102, 146, 147 

Mejia, Henry 102 

Melanson, Rebecca 102 

Melchor, Tomas 130 

Melson, Joshua 109 

Melton, Christy 54, 67, 75, 85, 94, 97, 106, 158, 164 

Meriam, Mary 7, 44, 62, 66, 67, 69, 80, 81, 90, 91, 92, 93, 106, 151 

Merritt, J. Scott 115 

Meyers, Austin 66, 83 

Miceli, Aimee 8, 15, 23, 26, 27, 42, 43, 60, 62, 69, 71, 94, 104, 105, 106, 163 

Michels, Diane 69, 112 

Middleton, Nancy E. 115 

Miller, Jessie 149, 162, 163 

Miller, Mark 67 

Miller, Susanna 78, 102, 108, 109 

Millhollon, Linda 97, 163 

Mitchell, Audrey 140, 141 

Moe, Rolin 6, 15, 18, 22, 43, 54, 77, 92 

Moeck, Melanie 45, 103, 141, 163 

Mogabgab, Owen 64, 168 

Montgomery, Linda 77 

Montgomery, Mindy 9, 15, 18, 19, 62, 69, 71, 76, 77, 82, 83, 97, 102, 103, 

105, 163 

Moore, Susan 113 

Moore, Zak 1 

Moores, Maria 68, 109, 132, 133, 163 

Morell, Spencer 93 

Morris, Carolyn 22, 58, 92, 154, 155, 163 

Morrison, Amanda 67 

Morse, Lisa 97 

Mort, Zach 77, 82 

Moulden, Christen 141 

Mueller, Adam 130 

Mull, Lisa 103, 142, 143, 163 

Muller, Casey 23, 83, 84, 94, 101, 149, 170, 171 

Murphy, Brittani 164 

Murphy, Dani 91, 164 

Murray, Jason 115 

Muse, Linda 115 

Mustin, Amanda 9, 22, 68, 98, 164 



Najjar, Ayman 7 

Najjar, Kaissar 92, 130 

Nash, Celeste 92, 164 

Neal, Ashly 8, 108, 109, 154, 163 

Newman, Harmony 77, 94 

Newsome, Kathe C. 115 

Newtown, George 16 

Nicol, Katiel 38 

Nicoletti, Lisa 119 

Nielsen, Stig 38 

Nonis, Mark 144 

Norwood, Jeremy 167 

Nugent, Ryan 130, 131 



O 



O'Dell, Jack 86 
O'Donnell, Virginia 149, 163 
Odem, Gale 125, 191 
Odukoya, Olufemi 128, 136 
Ogilvie, Landon 168, 169 
Olson, Catherine 146, 147 
Olson, Chase 77 
Olson, Valerie 103 
Ormond, Arturo 136 
Orr, David 130 
Ostermeyer, Bill 144 
Oswald, Ryan 82 
Owl, Baby 17 

P 

Palmer, Ashley 13, 98, 99, 133 

Panos, Ioanna 45, 92 

Parker, Lee 32, 69, 92, 115, 179 

Patrick, Aimee 103 

Patterson, Brandi 134, 135 

Patterson, Courtney 66, 67, 74 

Patterson, Parrin 6, 77 

Pattin, Nelly 39 

Paul, Wendy 65, 103, 108, 151, 164 

Pavletich, Corey 171 

Paxson, Kristen 26, 110, 152, 162, 163 

Peco, Greg 48, 177 

Perkins, Sarah 19 

Peterson, Jonathan 168 

Petrus, Amy 112 

Petten, Joci 135 

Pettway, Alexis 110, 138, 139 

Pezzi, Agnieszka 138 

Phifer, Emily 8 

Philbrook, Matthew 10, 15, 18, 22, 28, 54, 60, 76, 77, 87, 94, 106 

Phillips, Elizabeth 98 

Phillips, John "Rick" 115 

Pickard, Garret 15, 130 

Pierce, Benjamin 103 

Pierce, David 170, 171 

Pinkston, Brad 168, 169 

Pinnix, Emily 92, 163 

Pistorius, Rebecca 164 

Pitts, Elizabeth 108, 162, 163 

Polak, Lisa 9, 163 

Ponder, Brooke 146 

Ponder, Stuart 160, 161, 167 

Poole, Katie 163 

Poulin, Jeff 144, 145 

Powell, Monica 118 

Powers, Jennifer 163 

President:, Vice 171 

Prestridge, Allison 103, 134, 135 

Prickett, Joel 146 

Primeaux, Emily 65, 98, 150, 151, 160, 163 

Prince, Elizabeth 70 ■ 

Pritchard, Billy 77 MeX 187 



Q. 



Quillen, Elizabeth 7, 22, 35, 55, 64, 84, 160, 164 



R 



Rabenhorst, Brien 23, 55, 97, 98, 136, 137, 170, 171 

Rabenhorst, John 17, 19, 24, 26, 27, 55, 88, 92, 93, 94, 110, 170, 171 

Radar, Jeremy 168 

Raff, John 138 

Raish, Pete 110, 167 

Ramey, Kathryn 162, 163 

Rankin, Amanda Lee 9, 92, 163 

Rankin, Betsy 64, 119 

Ranns, Michael 77 

Rasbery, Jeanne 70, 71, 98 

Ratcliff, Cassandra 110 

Ratcliff, Joy F. 125 

Ratzburg, Heather 164 

Rawle, Melanie 67, 103 

Rawlings, Wesley 130 

Read, Margaret 34, 101 

Reamer, Mia 110 

Reed, Idrion 136 

Reeme, Trey 172 

Reischling, Rachel 110 

Reisig, Julie 98 

Reynolds, Lee 164 

Rhodes, Courtney 67, 98 

Rhodes, Patrick 144 

Rice, Joel 167 

Rice, Martha 163 

Richardson, Barrie 17, 36, 37, 40, 119 

Richardson, Shannon 1, 68, 92, 133, 163 

Rix, Mary Sue 14, 15, 114 

Roberts, Niki 48, 163 

Roberts, Patty 112 

Robertson, Tyler 98, 144 

Robideaux, Joe 85, 110, 144, 145 

Robinson, Aimee 149 

Robinson, Chris 34 

Rodriguez, Andres 38, 39 

Rogers, Tasha 45, 141, 163 

Roles, Tracy 144 

Root, Lisa 146 

Rousseau, Richard 130 

Rubel, Rob 12, 22, 56, 64, 76, 77, 92, 171 

Rundell, Amanda 25, 65, 98, 151, 164 

Russell, Melanie 67, 78, 92 

Ryan, Rachel 162, 163 



S 



Salinas, Ceci 7, 8, 18, 62, 66, 92, 94, 164 

Salyer, Zach 103, 130, 131, 167 

Sanders, Meredith 103 

Sandoval, Valerie 133 

Sarullo, Gina 110 

Saucier, Maria 34, 92, 180 

Savage, Robert 166, 167 

Scanlon, Bryan 99, 144 

Scarlato, Deborah 113 

Schick, Jason 144 

Schick, Joshl45 

Schlatter, Mark 66, 124 

Schmaltz, Gretchen 146 

Schneider, Shelly 148, 149 

Schubert, Charity 110 

Schwab, Kenneth 20, 41, 97, 111 

Scott, April 44 

Scott, Fred 117 

Seidler, Rosemary 120 

Seitz, Esther 110, 148, 149, 162, 163 

Sepulvado, Chad 166, 167 

Sessions, Blane 63, 64, 93, 144, 145, 179 

Sharp, Amanda 146 

i88 llndex 



Sharp, Brent 14 

Shaver, Autumn 18, 26 

Shelton, Kathryn 19 

Shelton, Stacy 99 

Shepherd, Samuel 123 

Shideler, Margo 34, 77, 163 

Sidaros, Peter 23 

Sieber, Nola 12, 22, 23, 42, 50, 91 

Simmons, Mark 168, 169 

Skywalker, Luke 22 

Slack, Laura 164 

Smith, Chris 130 

Smith, Doug 99 

Smith, Emily 163 

Smith, Ledah 133 

Smith, Randi 12, 44, 81, 104, 106, 109, 164 

Smith, Ross E. 125 

Smith, Sonja 118 

Smith, Traci 49, 110, 146, 147, 149 

Smitherman, Matthew 48, 167 

Smothers, Monica 110 

Smyth, Louise 99, 138 

Snider, Rebekah 36, 37, 99, 133 

Snipe, Sandi 15, 62, 67, 76, 77 

Soskin, Becky 47, 162, 160, 161, 163 

Southam, Kathryn 142 

Spruce, Catherine 133 

Staff, Jill 146 

Stallings, Lauren 9, 23, 25, 65, 104, 151, 163 

Starks, Sara Beth 67 

Starnes, Charlie 46, 94, 99, 102, 170, 171 

Stephens, Ryan 144 

Steves, J.W. 77 

Stewart, J.C. 130, 168 

Stewart, Jessica 56, 172 

Stewart, Laceyl33 

Stewart, Lynn 114 

Stewart, Patty 12 

Stojanova, Katica 104 

Stone, Thomas 125 

Stover, Kelly 15, 27, 64 

Street, Will 168, 169 

Stringer, Sarah 64, 110, 164 

Strout, Jessie 104 

Sturdivant, Amy 67, 104 

Sullivan, Amy 4, 24, 67, 74, 94, 110 

Surie, Neha 104 

Sutton, Drew 14, 25, 56, 61, 152, 170, 171 

Swoyer, Danika 164 

Szot, Jeff 149, 168 



T 



Tagert, Joanna 66, 77 

Talavera, Peter 48, 168 

Tarter, Holly 134, 135 

Tate, Travis 168 

Tatum, Terra 77 

Taylor, Amanda 34, 99, 101 

Taylor, Christina 101, 108, 110 

Taylor, Collin 29, 60, 68 

Taylor, Dawson 16, 22, 43, 50, 61, 69, 91, 93, 171 

Taylor, Stasia 104, 163, 169 

Teague, Chandler 125 

Tener, Beth 164 

Tennison, Jessica 134, 135 

Tharp, Melissal3, 133 

Thibault, Janelle 34, 141, 163 

Thomas, David 66, 124 

Thomas, Melissa 99 

Thomas, Montie 67, 103, 164 

Thomas, Nathan 127 

Thompson, Kathryn 110, 164 

Thorn, Brandon 22, 170, 171 

Thorn, Julia B. 125 

Threadgill, Calliel63 

Thull, Lesley 99 

Ticich, Tom 42, 120 

Tidmore, Victoria 104 

Tolis, Joey 136 



Tomorad, Kresimir 136, 137 
Tooke, Dian 116 
Tooke, Michael 19 
Townley, Katherine 146, 147 
Trahan, Jean 118 
Trahan, Jeffrey F. 126 
Treanor, Bryan 144 
Troczka, Gabrysia 138 

Tumbull, David 171 
Turner, John 46, 47, 121 



Z 



Zale-Bridges, Theresa 125 
Zeltser, Mark 125 



V 



Vaitkus, Ilka 121 
van, Dirk C. Raemdonck 123 
Vandenberg, Angela 26 
Vanderlick, Scott 48, 99, 161, 168 
Varnado, Casey 134, 135 
Vaughn, Nicole 67, 91, 164 
Vaughn, Zach 25, 93 
Vetter, Scott 40, 46, 47, 122 
Viskozki, Lynette 114 



W 



Waak, Nick 144 

Waguespack, Amy 13, 35, 62, 69, 104, 109, 141, 142, 153 

Walker, Garrett 167 

Walker, Laura 64, 72, 93, 94 

Wallace, Ellie 91, 164 

Walls, Anna 93, 154, 155, 163 

Walsh, Ryan 27, 110 

Ward, Noah 130 

Watkins, Julie 23, 101, 110, 164 

Watson, Erin 27, 37, 164 

Watson, Jennifer 27, 45, 64, 67, 84, 164 

Weaver, Johanna 34 

Webb, Jennie 45, 164 

Weeks, Monweh 104, 130, 190 

Welch, Yolanda 110 

Welch, Tommy 77 

Wellborn, Trey 8, 168 

Wells, William 41, 77, 170, 171 

West, Jennifer 8, 9, 14, 48, 77, 94, 163 

White, Brian 110 

White, Katie 92, 104, 164 

Wilcox, Don 119 

Wiley, Nina 110 

Willcox, Cristal 8, 15, 57, 61 

Williams, David 116 

Williams, Harmony 98 

Williams, Jason 130 

Williams, Lauren 133 

Williams, Patrick 77 

Williams, Sarah 99 

Williams, Shohn 136 

Williamson, Katie 66 

Wilson, Michael 105 

Wilt, Martha 118 

Wingert, Jason 166, 167, 181 

Winterer, Seth 144 

Wisniewski, Andrew 136 

Withrow, Justin 168 

Wolkomir, Michelle J. 127 

Woodall, Claire 112 

Woods, Mallory 163 

Wooldridge, Walter 105, 172 

Wrenn, Christy J. 115 

Wright, Dustin 144, 145 



Y 



Yearwood, Lindsay 
Yearwood, Mandy 
Young, Gary R. 116 
Young, Golda 116 
Young, Randy 93 



163 

13, 16, 22, 57, 60, 163 



Index 1 189 



ROCKIN'AND 
RELAXIN'. 
Many students 
made use of the 
new gazebo that 
was built behind 
lickle Hall. On 
nice afternoons 
students can be 
found in the 
swings visiting, 
studying, or just 
relaxingforawhile 
after a full day of 
classes. 



OW \ Sophomore Monweh Weeks gets fired up and throws his 

hands in the air duing a Gents basketball game. Students came out to many of the games 
this season to cheer their team on to victory. 




TREAD LIGHTLY! Sophomore Bobby Beaird walks across a 
bed of glass for the Physics/Chemistry fair held in the spring. 
Faculty and students came together to present a mindblowing and 
entertaining event for the campus. 



THE FINAL SECONDS. A senior soccer player walks off the 
field hand-in-hand with his parents. The players were honored in a 
special ceremony at the last game of the season. 



190 Inflate 



that can't be broken 



Whether it was the opening of the new fitness 
center, the addition of new faculty and staff, or the 
change of SGA presidents, change was definitely 
in the air at Centenary. However, one thing stayed 
exactly the same, and that is the closeness stu- 
dents feel with each other during their college 
days. As Centenary continues to grow, so do the 
friendships and bonds that are created within its 
walls. As old faces end thier college careers and 
enter the real world, fresh new faces will continue 

to come in and bring the life to Centenary that 

makes it so special. Through the years things will 

continue to grow and change, but one thing will 

forever remain the same: the unique intimacy 

among its people that makes Centenary College 

such a special place, a place where everybody 

knows your name. 



by: Nikki Doughty 




A FOND FAREWELL. 



Senior Ashley Hunter 



shares a laugh and a 



goodbye with music 



professor Dr. Gale Odom. 



Graduation gives students 



an opportunity to thank 



those professors that 



enriched their lives during 



their time at Centenary. 



closing | E 



ColopM- 



m Doiigfity: Editor 



As I sit here and write the final page of this book I am slowly beginning to grasp the realization that 
my job here is finished. Although I have worked on five other yearbooks in the past, this was by far the 
most challenging due to the complete independence I was granted during my year as editor. By the 
end of this process I can conclude that despite all the long, tiring, frustrating hours that went into this 
book, I am happy to have had this experience. One of the things I learned to appreciate most through 
this past year is the warmth and support of the students and faculty at this college. Their support in my 
final weeks of finishing this book was amazing. The way they pitched in to help, whether by loaning 
pictures or lending an ear for me to vent my frustrations, is one thing that truly carried me to this point: 
the final page. As a result, I am more proud than ever to be a part of this college family. 

My main goal for this book was to make it different, and I tackled that through the design of the 
layouts. It was my goal to feature as many students as possible thoughout the book, and that was 
achieved through an increase in pictures and quotes. So for those of you who are looking for the stories, 
you will find them told by your fellow peers through their quotes. You are the ones who lived through 
these experiences and made them happen, so you should be the ones to tell them. 

I would like to conclude by thanking my family and friends for all their support. Thank you for believing 
in me so much! I want to thank the faculty and my staff, especially those of you who completed all your 
assignments! Also, thank you, David Baker. It has been an honor and a pleasure working with you these 
past few years. 

So that's it! My work here is complete! I hope all of you have enjoyed the 75th volume of the 
Yoncopin. -Nikki Doughty 



In Topeka, Kansas Josten's Publishing Company 
printed the 75th volume of the Yoncopin. The paper is 80 
pound Gloss textpaper. The cover is custom embossed 
using school artwork. The material is Matte Black 480 
with applications in Silver #329 silkscreen and Silver Foil 
#480. An overgrain of people faces was used on front and 
back. The theme logo was designed by Amy Waguespack. 
The binding is smyth sewn with rounding and backing. 
The endsheets are Snow White #280 with the front 
printed in black using a school design. All layouts were 
designed by Nikki Doughty on Pagemaker 6.5 and 
Pagemaker 5.0. Sean Gilder was Photo Editor.Grade 
classifications for students were obtained from the 
Registrar's office. The basic font for the yearbook was 
Helvetica, and Alleycat was the theme font. 

This book would never have been published without 
the enthusiastic support of David Baker, our Jostens 
representative. We couldn't have done it without you! 
Also, we would like to extend our enormous appreciation 
to the Public Relations department for letting us hassle 
them all year for photographs. We would also like to thank 
the SGA, Dr. Nicoletti, Kristin Jenkins (our Jostens in- 
plant consultant), Sonja Smith, Sports Information, and 
everyone else who offered their help and support through- 
out the past year. Most importantly, we would like to thank 
the students, for this book would not exist without their 
help. 





Theme from Cfieers 

fyla/qngyour way in the world today 

Tafes everything you 'vejjot; 
Taking a Breai^from affyour worries 
Sure would help a lot 
Wouldn 'tyou life to get away? 

Sometimes you want to go 

Where eveyBody fqwwsyour name, 

JZnd they're always glad you eame; 

you want to he where you ean see 

Our trouSles are all the same; 

you want to Be where e 
very Body fqtowsyour name. 



m lcolopfion